40

The comma is enough as the second clause "I was right" is independent. Commas are used before conjunctions (but, and, yet, or, so, etc.) when the two clauses they are coordinating can stand as independent sentences. The semicolon is used when the first clause contains commas. I knew going in that the orange, marzipan and chilli flavor component of ...


30

There are three and a half different ways to use however*. This one needs a semicolon. The first is using it as a conjunctive adverb. In this sense the meaning of however is that the independent clause that follows counters the independent clause before it (denying it, giving a caveat, stating something as true that we would not expect considering the first ...


26

End punctuation for captions is ultimately a house style issue. I would certainly expect a caption containing more than one complete sentence to have end punctuation. But sentence fragments are subject to idiosyncratic handling. At the magazine where I work, for example, we would leave unpunctuated a fragmentary caption consisting solely of a manufacturer ...


16

The semicolon in the sentence in question does not connect two independent clauses, so it is used in the wrong place. Semicolons help us connect closely related ideas when a style mark stronger than a comma is needed. http://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/Semicolons.html Rules for Using Semicolons A semicolon is most commonly used to link (in a single sentence)...


15

They are both right. As is I knew going in that the orange flavor component of the cake was going to be lacking. And I was right. Your examples are both compound sentences. There are two independent clauses, joined by a conjunction (and) and separated by punctuation (either the comma or the semicolon). The comma is a softer break, the semicolon, a more ...


9

A comma seems fine. A quick look at google books shows that commas are common here, though sometimes there’s no punctuation at all. I found one case of parentheses, but not a single semicolon. The Economist’s advice on semicolons is to use them: to mark a pause longer than a comma and shorter than a full stop. Don't overdo them. So, it’s seems that ...


8

This is often called the "super-comma" function of the semicolon: it acts as a higher "level" of comma to separate list items when at least one of the items contains a comma. The general rule is to use the semicolons as you would use commas with ordinary list items: I arrange [X], co-ordinate [Y], and write [Z]. I arrange interviews ...


7

The comma is correct. The semicolon would be correct if the first clause was a complete sentence, but it is not. It includes "not only," which calls for a linking word, such as "also." ("This not only produces higher success rates, it also increases....") If you were to leave out "not only," the semicolon would become correct (but you would also lose the ...


7

Write what sounds natural. I like changing the verbs and joining with commas: There were many cases of animal suicide in the paper: a duck drowning itself after the death of its companion, a school of dolphins beaching itself for no apparent reason, a deer throwing itself from a cliff to avoid being eaten by hunting dogs. The list went on and on.


6

Yes, a semi-colon (;) is half a colon (:) above a comma (,). You Have a Point There. A Guide to Punctuation and its Allies (PDF) by Eric Partridge says: As THE name semicolon, half a colon, indicates, the semicolon comes historically after the colon; but in practice it is more important—at least, in the sense of being more popular. If anybody uses one ...


6

I would definitely use a comma. A semi-colon joins two related sentences and you have only one, albeit long, sentence. If you do do "their heads were crooked" then you do have two sentences, but I would use a period, not a semi-colon. I don't know your experience with English, but rarely do you need a semi-colon. If you have 2 sentences, a period works.


6

There are no upper limits on how many semicolons you can use; in fact, there aren't set limits on the number of adjectives you can use to describe a noun, or the number of clauses that can be attached to another relative clause, either; grammar doesn't normally prescribe such limits; leave it to the legal profession to stretch the boundaries of sensibility, ...


6

The semicolon is not used correctly. The Chicago Manual of Style explains (emphasis mine) — In regular prose, a semicolon is most commonly used between two independent clauses not joined by a conjunction to signal a closer connection between them than a period would. The sentence does not contain two independent clauses. It has a single, main ...


6

A modern discussion of compound points Following the lead of Nicholson Baker in a review of M.B. Parkes's Pause and Effect published in The New York Review of Books, Keith Houston, Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols & Other Typographical Marks (2013) refers to the ;— combination as a semi-colash. Houston reports that this form of ...


6

Each has a different meaning: It was all a facade, however; every Bloke and every Avaran knows that Martin would destroy them all whenever he decided to finish his conquest. This means that something ("It") had been a facade. The "however" implies that it being a facade comes as unexpected news. It was all a facade; however, every Bloke and every ...


5

This is a simple list of 3 elements, not a complex list of 2 elements whose second element contains two subelements. Case 1 deep red with black with dark green or dark purple medium shades of red with similar tones of green and orange; etc. Case 2 deep red with black with dark green or dark purple medium shades of red with similar ...


5

No, you don’t want a semi-colon there. A comma will do. Whom is grammatical, but so, too, would who be in an informal context.


5

The usage of both semicolons and commas is OK, if you have a list of simple sentences like in your question. There were four people who wanted to go on a trip: Jack because he was bored, Jill because she was tired of her monotonous life, John Doe because he wanted to get a flower for Jane Doe and Jane Doe because she was hoping for some surprise. There ...


5

Good catch - it shows careful reading. But consider that the story was published in 1846 (and probably written the year before). Today we might use either the semicolon or the em-dash (but not both). Typically, the part after a semicolon is a complete sentence - one that is closely related to the first part (also usually a complete sentence). (I'm glad ...


5

You can use either a semicolon or a colon to join two main clauses, but you can only use a colon to join a main clause with a noun or phrase. Here's an example: "Squiggly missed only one friend: Aardvark." You couldn't use a semicolon in that sentence because the two parts are unequal. I suggest: "My research focuses on pulsars: exotic remnants of dead ...


5

I certainly wouldn't ever punctuate in that way nor, I should hope would I ever write in such a tortuous manner. It either needs to be bullet-pointed, or else written as a piece of prose, with separate sentences for each item. And, as prose, it requires linking syntax. My suggestion would be something like the following. I have also eliminated the ...


5

A Google search for "He's quite dead. I assure you." (which as expected shows more hits than the "I'm" version, if not many more) only gives examples of your versions B and A. Comma splices are not wrong per se, as discussed in this previous thread. And I'd say that version B is the best here ('I assure you' is best not analysed as an independent clause ...


5

It is acceptable to use semi-colons in a list. However, the semi-colon is a stronger separator than a comma, so your example is effectively making a list which separates the items like this (which doesn't make sense): gene1 kidney disease, gene2 cardiac arrhythmia, gene3 arterial stiffness, gene4 aortic aneurysm It would be better to swap the commas and ...


4

Yes, those are both clauses, but it is not correct to use a semicolon. You must join them with a comma. This is because those are not two independent clauses (essentially, two complete sentences). Rather, the first one is governed by the conjunction when.


4

Dashes can be used in place of parentheses to indicate an aside or qualifying statement. I don't think either has a place in any of your examples. Generally speaking, for the same reason you're having a hard time understanding their use, it's a good idea to avoid using semicolons altogether. The semicolon is intended to separate two sentences where the ...


4

A semicolon ends a statement which is followed by a related statement; it cannot end a question. It's possible to argue "But I just used it to end a question," but because a semicolon ends a statement, you have turned your question into an ungrammatical statement. The punctuation mark which indicates a question is a question mark ?.


4

There are no strict rules governing the use of semicolons, and few consistent conventions. By and large the semicolon is used when you want to mark a disjunction as 'stronger' than one marked by a comma but not so strong as one marked by a full stop. One fairly routine use, for instance, is to distinguish successive list items which themselves require ...


4

Because of your use of commas and semi-colons, it's not exactly clear how the lists are organised, but assuming this: new technologies web development using varying javascript packages including: node.js; meteor.js; backbone.js, contributing to open source projects on github, and getting my hands deep into code. ...then — if you can't actually ...


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