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You don't have to enter into these considerations; this is so because "give or take" is an idiom that applies to any evaluation. (OALD) give or take (something) ​if something is correct give or take a particular amount, it is approximately correct It'll take about three weeks, give or take a day or so.


5

"give or take" is a fixed (set) phrase that means... approximately Cambridge on-line defines it as ... possibly a little more or less than the amount or time mentioned: a little more or a little less compared to the amount mentioned It is an idiom that indicates a range; trying to parse it is possibly a waste of time.


1

The general understanding is probably ambiguous, but I would parse it this way: If the thing being modified by "give or take" is the time required for the project, then if I'm giving time to the project, it would take longer. If I'm taking time from the project it would be completed earlier. Likewise with the time allocated for the vacation, I ...


0

What term would you use to describe those "public outsiders"? They can be known as "the control" or "the control group". These terms are more popular with experiments that use a drug on some and a placebo on others, but they also refer to a group who does not experience the experiment and is merely observed so as to discover ...


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You can label the groups more generically, for example, The participants were divided into two groups: Group A, comprised of participants who scored above X on the suicide risk assessments, and Group B, who scored below X. If you want less generic labels, you can refer to them as the high-risk and low-risk group, or high-risk patients and low-risk patients....


-1

Pretty sure there must be a more precise word, but I offer laity the mass of the people as distinguished from those of a particular profession or those specially skilled writers who can interpret this wholeness both to their colleagues and the laity. — P. B. Sears [Merriam-Webster]


0

Counter, as in off-set. Although counter itself can be opposing! Definition of counter (Entry 3 of 7) transitive verb. 1a : to act in opposition to : oppose. b : offset, nullify tried to counter the trend toward depersonalization. 2 : to assert in answer We countered that our warnings had been ignored. Source - Google People also ask:What is the definition ...


1

"Inconvenient" is not merely unidiomatic when used in this way; it is incorrect. Convenience is an aspect of a physical goal or objective itself; it does not describe the method by which a goal or objective is achieved. Nor is it a descriptor of value, esthetic quality or craftsmanship. One would not describe a work of art, a blanket or a TV ...


0

As linguistictum has explained, in other circumstances the given sentence could be considered to be acceptable, however, if one accepts infinitieunique’s interpretation of the intended meaning, “inconvenient” is incorrect. The sentence could have been “Your attempt at explaining your problem was too [vague/imprecise/confusing] to [facilitate/allow] a proper [...


0

I would say yes, the semantics is off. The sentence would make sense in some other contexts, for example this one. While you were explaining your problem to the speaker, there were some other people present. Something you said in the course of your explanation caused these other people to become somewhat upset with the speaker; not very strongly or ...


0

It is not one of the usual terms that are used for speaking of the quality of a piece of writing. In other words, as used, it is not very idiomatic. To compound the incertitude there is the fact that you don't know whether the inconvenience was caused to the writer or to the reader, but in the end this might not matter. The definition (not useful to you ...


1

When the meaning of something is said to be 'lost in translation' it is usually the case that the phrase which has been translated has an idiomatic meaning in the original language which it does not have in the target language. This means that when the phrase is translated it either has a different meaning in the target language or is completely meaningless. ...


1

It is easy to translate from one language to another and make a mistake by using a word that seems correct but is wrong in the complete context. A good example is when the idea “They are working hard” (meaning that they are doing a lot of work and are making great effort) is translated from another language into English as “They are hardly working” (meaning ...


1

Yes, in general, there is a difference, though this is context-dependent. If you say People are lazy, for example, you might mean nothing more than that quite often, people are lazy. But if you say All people are lazy, this is a much stronger statement which sounds like you are pointing out an essential fact about humans (and of course this stringer ...


1

'Horizontal' means 'relating to the horizon', so strictly speaking whether a split is vertical or horizontal depends on its orientation relative to the ground. Or less strictly, 'horizontal' is whatever the observer considers to be left/right rather than up/down. Whether that's the long or short axis has no bearing (which is good for the OP's terminal window ...


0

dislike (verb) = to not like Cambridge 1: opposite = completely different OR 2: opposite = being in a position on the other side Cambridge The two senses of opposite, although connected, are not the same. It is important to distinguish them: Using sense 1, dislike (even if it include indifference, neutrality or other shades of partiality), being "not ...


0

Not liking and disliking are different notions but could be the same depending on the situation. For example. If you said to me: Do you like custard? I would say "I don't like custard" and I may add "but I don't dislike it". In this sense 'not liking' does not imply a dislike. If you asked if I like root canal treatment I would say that &...


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