3

I'm going to quote a comment that I think efficiently lays out some of the presuppositions that this question is based on, in order to express some disagreement with those presuppositions: in principle one of these two options should be grammatically correct (albeit awkward), right? Which one? It is not acceptable to add the -'s genitive (or "Saxon ...


3

The sentence is perfectly grammatical as it is. Here a friend of mine's is called a phrasal genitive. We say that mine's has double case-marking, an inner case and an outer case. See especially the discussion following the examples in [65], below. Discussion Here is the relevant section of CGEL (pp. 479-480): 16.6 Head and phrasal genitives ...


2

every people's time is wrong, you cannot (most of the time) use a plural noun with every. All people's time is not a correct choice either. Luckily, there's a single word to describe this: everyone: I want to sum everyone's time That one is correct, but you may want consider the following alternative: I want the total time


2

A variable may have many attributes. It possesses each of them, so it is definitely wrong to use 'the variable value' to express the meaning you require. That phrasing is wrong for another reason too, because 'variable' is an adjective as well as a noun so 'the variable value' seems to refer to a value that is variable, which is not what you want to say. ...


2

1) The definite article is not necessary in these kinds of contexts. In documentation of this sort, you'll see both "a user makes a request" and "the user makes a request," since you're speaking of a hypothetical user. Of course, if you defined a narrower subset of users and were speaking about them, you'd need the direct article: "Users can log in and ...


1

When wondering about questions like this, I consult: google n-grams, which show that for the reader's convenience is by far the most common of the three expressions a large corpus such as the Corpus of Contemporary American English, where reader 's convenience (the space is there because of the way words are separated in the corpus) yields a single result,...


1

"events sequence" is grammatically incorrect, but "event sequence" is perfectly valid. In general, it's incorrect to use the plural for an attributive noun. All nouns except the final must be singular, though there seem to be weird exceptions ("Natural Sciences Research") You could say the result of the event sequence analysis Or the result of ...


1

Ted's and your dinner conversation tonight was so boring. According to CMOS: Joint possession is shown by a single apostrophe plus -s only when two nouns are used. If a noun and a pronoun are used to express joint possession, both the noun and the pronoun must show possession. For example, Hilda and Eddie’s vacation becomes (when Eddie has already been ...


1

3 ("my emails dated Jan. 15' reception") is certainly incorrect. A final apostrophe can only ever be used to mark the "Saxon genitive" when it comes directly after an /s/ or /z/ sound.* In other contexts, the "Saxon genitive" marker has to be written as <'s>, even when the head noun is plural: note that we write children's, not children'. So if you must ...


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