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32

The correct answer is one's! All possessives get an apostrophe, except the standard possessive pronouns and these are: yours, his, hers, ours, theirs, its Apart of these, always add an apostrophe.


24

There is a bias against the genitive case with inanimate things, that is sometimes found in advice to avoid it in some cases. In some cases that advice is indeed, that one should only use it with people and sometimes that one should only use it with living things. (So "the dog's" is allowed, but "the car's" is not). Fowler raged against it, and blamed ...


19

This site states it very well: A less-often faced decision involves the use of apostrophes where multiple owners are named. Where two or more people own one item together, place an apostrophe before an "s" only after the second-named person. For example: Incorrect: Bill's and Mary's car was a lemon, leading them to seek rescission of their ...


16

You are right. If the distillery is jointly possessed by the poets and painters then you only need the apostrophe after Painters. Similarly, John and Mary's house is the house owned jointly by John and Mary. If John and Mary each have their own houses, then you need apostrophes after both possessive nouns: John's and Mary's houses. Note, however, that to ...


15

It would depend on what you meant. If you mean the Brazilian army was short of ammunition, then you would write the Brazilian Army's ammo supply is low. But if you were referring to an army that is not the Brazilian army, but instead owned or run by a particular Brazilian (perhaps an army of toy soldiers, or an army of mercenaries), then the Brazilian's ...


12

According to The Grammar Bible by Michael Strumpf (page 29), in a section on "Possessive Case": Sometimes possession is shared by several nouns. In these cases, just make the last word in the series possessive. America and Canada's timber resources are dwindling Thomas and French's discovery shocked the world. Leslie and Eric's lasagna is to ...


10

Mens is sometimes used as an alternative for, you guessed it, men's. It looks invalid because it's a possessive which should have an apostrophe before the "s" but as it's caught on, it's just considered acceptable now. There's also the common noun menswear which is often used instead of men's wear.


8

The English apostrophe-s is not a case inflection the way you have in German or Russian, Latin or Greek. Rather it is a clitic that attaches to the end of the entire noun phrase, not merely to the head noun of that phrase. That's why you have things like the Queen of England’s hat on one hand or King Henry VIII’s many unfortunate wives on the other. Just ...


8

Short answer You could say either. However, it would perhaps be more natural to say a friend of John's, as the Original Poster suggests. The reason for this is that the speaker will probably want to mark the noun phrase as indefinite. Full answer Noun phrases in English come in two parts. For example, in the noun phrase a huge elephant, the first part is ...


7

If the boat is posssessed equally by the three, you only need put the apostrophe on the last person's name. E.g., John, Jacob, and Mary's boat. The possessive, in a list, on the last person shows collective possession of the group.


6

No, you cannot use things like FDA as adjectives: there is no such thing as **FDAer regulations* or **FDAest regulations* — nor can anything be **very FDA*, or **more FDA* than another any more than regulations can ever "be" FDA. So it is not acting as an adjective there. However, even though they cannot be adjectives, it’s perfectly fine to use them as ...


6

Normally, a phrase like "the dog's collar" has exactly the same meaning as "the collar of the dog." In this particular case, though, the expression "Land of X" has a special meaning--something like "the land which is characterized by X." When we speak of "the land of Lincoln" or "the land of cotton" or "the land of 10,000 lakes," we mean that those are the ...


5

As I’ve said in answer to a related question, it’s misleading to think of the apostrophe exclusively as a possessive marker. It’s more helpful to think of it as a genitive inflection, certainly capable of expressing possession (John’s car), but also used to specify or classify the reference of a noun (the girl’s face, a bird’s nest or, indeed, the car’s ...


5

"X and Y's wedding" would mean the wedding was between X and Y; "X's and Y's wedding" would refer to two distinct weddings. Comma sense—the fun-damental guide to punctuation (Richard Lederer and John Shore) contains the following note about the usage of the apostrophe in such cases: If two or more people possess the same thing, you need only to put the ...


5

NOTE: Ignore this first bit and skip down to the EDIT section for the right answer. I misread the sentence on first (and second, and third) reading. The closest sentence with correct grammar (but not sense) that matches your own is: The program runs on whoever runs its computer. Because the object of the preposition on is not **whomever*, which is ...


5

You make the noun plural and the entire phrase possessive using the so-called “Saxon genitive”: The queen of England’s favorite food is cake. All queens of England’s favorite food is cake. Compare: The attorney general’s office. All attorneys general’s offices. If that annoys you when you do that, then as the doctor said, don’t do that — just use the ((...


5

The "possessive -'(s) construction in English has several uses. In modern English, the most common and productive usage is to turn an entire NP (or DP, depending on what framework you're working with) into something that functions as a determiner/determinative. For example, we can turn the NP "the men" into the determiner/determinative "the men's", and ...


5

My English professor told me that we use of when we are talking about something that is part of or related to another thing. For example, ceiling of my room or subject of the lecture. But 's is used when we are speaking about the ownership relationships and usually related to a person. For example Ali's car or students' room. But according to my researches, ...


5

Consider the following progression: "I found my ticket, but not yours." "I found my ticket, but not John's." "I've enjoyed some Victorian novels, but not Dickens's." [pronunciation as indicated] "I found our tickets, but not the Smiths'." [pronunciation as indicated] "I saw our neighbours at the show, but not the Smiths'." I think ...


5

I think you might be mistaking attributive nouns in noun–noun compounds for possessive nouns with apostrophes, but I’m not completely certain. When you have a child entertainer, the word child is used attributively not possessively. A noun or noun phrase in English is only considered possessive when it is written with an actual apostrophe, as you would ...


4

I sang to John and Mary's daughter. This is ordinarily understood to express your 'I sang to a female who calls her father John, and calls her mother Mary'. John and Mary is a single conjunctive expression standing in a genitive relationship to daughter. If you want to distinguish this from 'I sang to a guy named John and I sang to this girl who said she ...


4

Yes, you need the apostrophe. -s' denotes possession of some thing or things by multiple owners. The roots belong to the trees; the trees own the roots. Therefore, the roots are the trees' roots.


4

While the possessive 's and whose can be used with inanimate objects in many cases, this does not apply to any context. The product feels a bit too much like a person or a topic/theme here if used with the possessive 's; a noun adjective would seem more appropriate. I'd prefer something like this: Supershaver Design Department If the name of this product ...


4

Use of the genitive for inanimate objects is not considered a fault. There are occasional suggestions that it's loose usage, but these are usually very old, prescriptive guides that do not reflect modern usage. For example: The car's design is woefully dated. Completely standard in all registers.


4

The Modern English possessive suffix -'s is not a case any longer. Cases inflect nouns, but the -'s attaches to the end of noun phrases, rather than to their head nouns. Technically, an affix that attaches to a syntactic construction instead of to a word of a particular type is called a clitic (a clitic can be either an enclitic or a postclitic, just like ...


4

Sure. Why not. There's nowhere better to put it. (Although some would cite this as a reason why we would be better off without the dot.)


4

If Alex and Jen are marrying each other, then it is "Alex and Jen's wedding". If somehow they are marrying two other people, then it is "Alex's and Jen's wedding". This distinction becomes more significant when the possession is also plural. Alex and Jen's cats are the cats owned jointly by Alex and Jen. Alex's and Jen's cats are the cat or cats owned by ...


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