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What is the English idiomatic equivalent to the Russian “бряцать регалиями” (to “rattle one’s medals”)?

The Russian original is well explained in your question, which nicely transfers the discussion from trivial translation to English Language and Usage. Rattling your medals is to assert your position ...
Anton's user avatar
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24 votes

What is the English idiomatic equivalent to the Russian “бряцать регалиями” (to “rattle one’s medals”)?

An English equivalent is: throw one's weight around INFORMAL be unpleasantly self-assertive. "he didn't swagger or throw his weight around" You want to avoid “rattle” because English ...
Xanne's user avatar
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21 votes
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Word for person attracted to shiny things

Perhaps surprisingly, the answer is in your own question: "сорока" = magpie magpie (countable noun): If you describe someone as a magpie, you mean that they like collecting and keeping ...
Anton's user avatar
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20 votes
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Idiomatic expression for "putting off a task until a disaster strikes"

‘A stitch in time saves nine’ expresses essentially the same idea: a preventive fix done early is much easier than an emergency fix after disaster strikes. The main difference is the temporal ...
PLL's user avatar
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19 votes

Idiomatic expression for "putting off a task until a disaster strikes"

Shut the stable door after the horse has bolted seems quite close to your intended meaning.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
14 votes
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Does the idiom "step on a rake" mean making the same mistake twice?

Stepping on a rake evokes the visual "joke" of someone walking carelessly onto a lying rake and getting violently struck in the face and torso, it's been used in cartoons and slapstick ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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12 votes

What is the English equivalent to the proverb "Somebody finds his soup not thick enough, and somebody finds his pearls too small"

Perhaps the nearest is Chandler's sarcastic complaint in Friends season 2: "My wallet is too small for my fifties and my diamond shoes are too tight." This, and particularly the last 6 words,...
Stuart F's user avatar
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10 votes
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Can you say "bald hill" to mean a hill that has no trees on it?

Bald means with little or no hair on the head (Cambridge) so metaphorically, it would describe the hill as having no vegetation, not even grass. A hill of solid earth, or a hill after a huge fire ...
fev's user avatar
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7 votes

Can you say "bald hill" to mean a hill that has no trees on it?

The very first definition in Merriam-Webster [link] is: : lacking a natural or usual covering (as of hair, vegetation, or nap) (emphasis mine), and one of its examples is indeed "a bald hill&...
ruakh's user avatar
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6 votes

Idiomatic expression for "putting off a task until a disaster strikes"

Kicking the can down the road. Idiom: to avoid or delay dealing with a problem
Alan's user avatar
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5 votes

What is the English idiomatic equivalent to the Russian “бряцать регалиями” (to “rattle one’s medals”)?

it is more like Alice thinks she has some intangible leverage (as opposed to tangible, like a gun or a pair of goons by her side) which in her mind is enough to ask for a favour. People like Alice ...
Caleb's user avatar
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5 votes

Grants distribution but with pejorative connotation

In English, there's the idiom gravy train: a way of making money quickly, easily, and often dishonestly. The Russian idiom "to saw grants" ("пилить гранты") can be roughly ...
CowperKettle's user avatar
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5 votes
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What do you call someone who studies Russia?

The word Russologist is used to refer to persons who are experts on Russia. Examples: Stanford's most accomplished Russologist returns home, to cheers (...) I took McFaul's Russian Politics ...
English Student's user avatar
5 votes

Does the idiom "step on a rake" mean making the same mistake twice?

The idea that stepping on a rake meaning repeatedly making the same mistake might be influenced by a (slightly famous?) scene from The Simpsons (from the episode Cape Feare, S05E02), where the ...
JonathanZ's user avatar
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4 votes
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Why is the word "Cyrillic" pronounced with a soft "c"?

The 'c' is always soft before a 'y'. Soft c: When “c” is followed by: e, i, y it is sounded as “s.” The letter “c” has two sounds, hard “c” and soft "c". The hard sound of "c" occurs ...
Cathy Gartaganis's user avatar
4 votes
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Perforability - a correct term similar to Russian "перфорированность", meaning "relative area of a surface occupied by pores"

The OP requests a term for "the relative area of a surface occupied by pores." porosity / surface porosity The definition of porosity is The ratio of the volume of interstices of a material ...
DjinTonic's user avatar
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4 votes

What is the English idiomatic equivalent to the Russian “бряцать регалиями” (to “rattle one’s medals”)?

In classical rhetoric, this was called an argument from authority or an appeal to authority, with negative connotations as this was considered a “logical fallacy.” Both had Latin equivalents that ...
Davislor's user avatar
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4 votes

Idiomatic expression for "putting off a task until a disaster strikes"

The only phrase I can think of, is we would sometimes describe a situation like this as 'an accident waiting to happen'. It literally suggests that the situation/method in use brings forth disaster on ...
Aaron's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the English idiomatic equivalent to the Russian “бряцать регалиями” (to “rattle one’s medals”)?

I went in search of idioms that would fit into the context of your example scenario & sentence: Someone (say Alice) wants to get a better deal for his/her acquaintance (say Bob) from a third ...
loonquawl's user avatar
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3 votes

Word for person attracted to shiny things

@Anton's answer of magpie is probably the way to go here. But I feel compelled to throw in positive phototaxis which is the compulsion of an organism to move towards bight objects. (Wikipedia) Like a ...
Jim Simson's user avatar
3 votes

"Scientists and poets" — translation of the Russian phrase

The whole point of the original expression is not what it means, but how it sounds. In Russian just like in English, one could easily express the given idea in a dozen different ways. However, only ...
RegDwigнt's user avatar
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3 votes

English equivalent of Russian "по кд" meaning "used repeatedly and as soon as possible"

From what I understand, your expression (по кд) is a gaming term, so the word you are looking for is almost certainly “spam”: Spamming, in the context of video games, refers to the repeated use of ...
Laurel's user avatar
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3 votes
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Difference between /æ/ and /ɛ/

Not all English speakers use the same pronunciations. Unfortunately, English has pretty weird vowels so it's hard to give good advice about how to differentiate them for non-native speakers. Some ...
herisson's user avatar
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3 votes

Does the idiom "step on a rake" mean making the same mistake twice?

In (American) English "stepping on a rake" implies not just making a mistake, but making a foreseeable mistake, which you should have avoided by not being so sloppy and careless. You stepped ...
RonJohn's user avatar
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2 votes

Something similar to "stir up/kick hornets' nest"

create a paradigm shift. This term was first used in the philosophy of science. Wikipedia, paradigm shift says: A paradigm shift, a concept identified by the American physicist and philosopher ...
ab2's user avatar
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2 votes
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English equivalent to Russian "Ты обалдел/офигел/etc.?"

"What the hell is wrong with you!?"
Chris's user avatar
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2 votes
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What do native English speakers mean by "Russian"?

Although this question is very similar to ‘what’s the difference between being English or being from the UK?’, I think that there is scant awareness of the difference between ‘Russian’ (from the ...
Jelila's user avatar
  • 5,629
2 votes

What is the English idiomatic equivalent to the Russian “бряцать регалиями” (to “rattle one’s medals”)?

I don't believe there is a direct equivalent, I've certainly not found one. But on the other hand, English is a very flexible language and new idioms arise all the time. If you told someone they didn'...
Ruadhan2300's user avatar
2 votes

What is the English idiomatic equivalent to the Russian “бряцать регалиями” (to “rattle one’s medals”)?

The phrase blow one's own trumpet comes to mind: (source) Definition of blow one's own trumpet British, informal : to talk about oneself or one's achievements especially in a way that shows that one ...
Alex Walker's user avatar
2 votes

Idiomatic expression for "putting off a task until a disaster strikes"

‘Whistling past the graveyard’ can be taken in a number of ways, but the one I mostly think of applies here. To me, it conjures an image of someone blissfully ignorant of (or studiously ignoring) the ...
Mike's user avatar
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