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89

The English word minute in the time sense (and the various similar European words) came from Latin 'pars minuta prima' or 'first small part'; when it became necessary to subdivide even further, the obvious term was 'pars minuta secunda' which became second and its various cognates. (Best explained in Etymonline.)


51

According to Wiktionary, Galician, Catalan and Occitan have a word fada "fairy" and Italian has fata with the same meaning, which seems like a clear confirmation of a Vulgar Latin form *fata meaning "fairy". (And as tchrist points out, Spanish has hada, because it had a historical change of /f/ to /h/ in many contexts.) I don't know if there are any ...


43

Epiphany has nothing to do with phones—it is etymologically an ‘out-showing’ or manifestation, and until recently was used primarily for the manifestation of a divine being: most often, as in the Feast of the Epiphany, the manifestation of Christ to the world at large. The modern sense derives primarily from the work of James Joyce (though he had ...


27

Disillusion (v.): to make someone realize that something which they thought was true or good is not really true or good: I hate to disillusion you, but I don't think she's coming back. Disenchantment (n.) [uncountable]: disappointment with someone or something, and no longer believing that they are good: Voters expressed growing disenchantment ...


13

First, the English rule has to do with syllable structure. As Colin points out, English syllables can't begin with the consonant cluster /pt/. Any word spelled that way will be pronounced some other way. But the sequence /pt/ can occur between syllables. So if the vowel before /pt/ is stressed (as in archeopteryx /ar.ki.'ap.tər.ɪks/), then both stops can be ...


13

Verbmall has an interesting creation on the opposite of epiphany: So, let me approach the question from an etymological perspective. An epiphany leads a person to a burst of internal light. We need a term to metaphorically express leading a person to a dark cave. Let’s save the epi-, meaning to, and let’s add the combining form -calyptry, from the Greek ...


13

Actually, "arhythmic" is recognized by many dictionaries as an alternate spelling (for example, Merriam Webster). As Henry notes, the Greek word is ἄρρυθμος "arrhythmos", so the spelling with one r does not come directly from Greek; it instead seems to derive from a re-combination in English of the elements "a-" and "rhythmic," exactly the way you ...


11

Yes: the root is ultmately rogare, "ask". Interrogative: asking at intervals, or between people. Prerogative: this comes from Latin, "to be asked first" and connotes privilege. Derogative: this means partial abrogation. Abrogation comes directly from a Latin root abrogare "to repeal, to disregard, ignore, repudiate, to cancel, revoke, to take away" (OED). ...


10

Vi is proper Latin, and it means "with violence, violently", the ablative of vis, "force, violence", from Proto-Indo-European *u̯i-, with similar meaning, and probably related to various other roots and their reflexes. Words like vir "man", virtus "might, virtue", violo "violate" (all senses) come from *vi-. If you scribble v.c. next to your signature on a ...


10

The trick is to get the two stops into separate syllables. With archaeopteryx, the p ends one syllable and the t starts the next one. With pterodactyl, no such luxury is possible, so the p is lost. See also apnea versus pneumonia.


10

Π (pi) in Greek is pronounced as P in English, and Τ (tau) in Greek is pronounced as T in English. Greek though is quite okay with PT at the start of a syllable, while that isn't a phoneme cluster we have in English. So, while we can pronounce both letters if we end one syllable with P and start the next with T, we will make the P silent at the start of a ...


9

No, it is not how the ancient Greeks pronounced it: /pt/ was a possible initial cluster (as were /pn/, /ps/ and /kt/). In English, /ps/ is a possible initial cluster (though it is rare, and pretty well confined to words of Greek origin) but /pt/, /pn/ and /kt/ are not possible initially, and get simplified (as does /kn/, which was possible in Old English). ...


9

Words borrowed into English from non-English languages are sometimes called loanwords. Examples of such might include Zeitgeist, façade, jalapeño, sushi. However, that “loanword” status is soon dropped as the word spends more time in our mouths, and the origin of the word is no longer considered worth pointing out. For example, we no longer think of words ...


8

Their roots are all in the Latin word, rogāre, to ask. They all have to do with asking. Prerogative, meaning to have a right, is from Latin praerogātīvus, meaning asked first, to ask before anyone else. (prae-, pre- + rogāre, to ask.) Derogative is from Latin dērogāre, meaning to repeal some part of a law, modify it. It is from Latin de- + rogāre to ask;...


8

Although it originates in Greek as ἄρρυθμος, this kind of pattern is not uncommon in English. A comparable example is irregular, which comes from Latin.


8

I.e. primary and secondary division by 60, where one minute is 1/60th part. Minute here refers to part and originates from "minutus" meaning "made small". The etymology is quite confusing: A minute is short for "pars minuta prima" where they've omitted "prima" meaning "primary". A "second", which is a part of a part, comes from "pars minuta secunda", where ...


7

There are two important distinctions. The first is that thou (and thy, thine, thyself) is second-person singular. Ye is second-person plural. You is second-person of either singular and plural (originally only a case of plural). As such, you can use thou only of one person. Ye would generally be used for either the plural, but due to the "T-V distinction" (...


7

Religion comes from Latin religio; many people from Cicero onwards have speculated about the origin of religio, but there is no known answer. Legere meant originally 'to pick out', and went by a fairly obvious route to 'to read'. You will have to make your own mind up about etymonline.com; like most sources it is useful if you understand it but not if ...


7

Why do you think inadvertently means unknowingly? It doesn’t. It means, in the OED’s definition, ‘without due attention or thought; inattentively, heedlessly, carelessly; hence, unintentionally.’ The root meaning of words derived from Latin advertere is ‘turn or direct towards’. Advertent means ‘intentional, deliberate; conscious’, because in being ...


7

A sinking feeling or a stomach drop is what comes to mind. "I had a sinking feeling as I realised that I hadn't confirmed the bookings for the flight we were heading toward." "My stomach dropped when I realised that I'd accidently deleted all my work."


6

The question makes a false assumption in claiming etymonline.com says: The etymology of “religion” comes from “legere” meaning to read + “re” meaning again. Read the etymonline.com entry again, it only says for certain that English "religion" comes from Latin religio (via Anglo-French and Old French). Beyond this, it offers three possible different roots:...


6

You got two different Ablaut grades of the same root, plus a different root here. One root is Proto-Indo-European *ped- 'foot', as noted. This comes in two varieties: the E-grade, represented in Latin pedis 'foot', with root ped- the O-grade, represented in Greek podos 'foot', with root pod- English borrowed lots of words with both of these roots: ...


6

Egregious (adj) 1530s, "distinguished, eminent, excellent," from Latin egregius "distinguished, excellent, extraordinary," from the phrase ex grege "rising above the flock," from ex "out of" (see ex-) + grege, ablative of grex "a herd, flock" Disapproving sense, now predominant, arose late 16c., originally ironic. It is not in the Latin word, ...


6

Both words were borrowed from Latin via French. The Latin verb is reparare. In modern French, it is spelled réparer; in Old French, when it was borrowed by English, it was reparer. The English word is first attested in the 14th century. Early forms in English were repare, repayre, repeire, repeyre, and repaire, probably because those all sounded very ...


5

Magnificent? Impressively beautiful, elaborate, or extravagant; striking Oxford Dictionary It doesn't really imply anything about size, but it does derive from magnus.


5

There is (but it isn't in common use). Magnitudinous: The adjectival form of magnitude. Having the quality of greatness in size, amount, importance, etc. Wordnik


4

Neither of the above answers is really correct. The correct answer is that the variation in "opaque" ~ "opacity" (and many similar words, e.g. "divine" ~ "divinity", "serene" ~ "serenity", "profound" ~ "profundity"; also "wild" ~ "wilderness", etc.) is due to a sound change known as Trisyllabic laxing. This is well-explained in the Wikipedia article I just ...


4

From its etymology: mid-12c., "the exercise of authority in vindication of right by assigning reward or punishment;" also "quality of being fair and just," from Old French justice "justice, legal rights, jurisdiction" (11c.), from Latin iustitia "righteousness, equity," from iustus "upright, just" (see just (adj.)). The Old French word had widespread ...


4

A generic word or phrase, like sudden realization, will do quite nicely. You can also get physical and refer to the pit of your stomach. If you are looking for a cutesy or humorous term, Douglas Adams defines the following in The Meaning of Liff: ELY (n.) — The first, tiniest inkling you get that something, somewhere, has gone terribly wrong. ...


4

Let us consider the example of "no less than the country's president attended". In many countries with the title president, they are of considerable political power. In most of the rest, it is still a position of considerable esteem. As such, there would be few, or no, potential attendees of greater rank. So, the set of people who are "not less" than the ...


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