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17

From what I understand, hour, fire, hire, layer, rhythm, etc., are all examples of words which are not easily classifiable. But, according to this linguist, Hour and fire are generally considered to be monosyllabic words containing a triphthong. Wikipedia further confirms this in a couple of its articles. Triphthong (WP): English in British Received ...


13

It would appear that the word you’re looking for is L-vocalization, which, to quote the wikipedia page on the topic, “is a process by which an [l] sound is replaced by a vowel or semivowel sound”, which appears to be what is being described here, specifically with regards to English L-vocalization — where “an /l/ sound occurring at the end of a word or ...


11

Not that everything I learned in school was true, but I remember being taught that most dictionaries – at least print dictionaries – broke words into syllables, and this was one of those things that dictionaries were useful for. So, one could always count the number of •'s, and add one, and get the number of syllables in a word: One dictionary's own ...


10

For RP, doesn't khan, con, corn work? If you allow widely-known foreign foods, how about pawed, pod, pad, where pad is as in pad thai (and that one even works for rhotic accents).


10

In Received Pronunciation, Standard* British English and most New Zealand accents, /r/ is only pronounced when it precedes a vowel sound, so the “r” in “heart” is not pronounced. But in Standard* American English and in many UK regional accents the /r/ is pronounced. That’s why we include it in the spelling. When the /r/ is pronounced it is known as a ...


10

As a speaker of Southern Standard British English (RP), these two words are homophones for me. They are both pronounced /kə'rɪə/. However, SSBE is non-rhotic - we only pronounce /r/ before a vowel sound. For speakers of rhotic Englishes, for example General American, or some regional varieties of British English (e.g. speakers from Scotland or the south ...


9

"What causes that sound?" - one could just as well ask why the American English speakers -don't- pronounce it. A reasonable response would be that it's not spelled that way, but to counter that, there's all sorts of pronunciations in English that "aren't spelled that way". But to answer directly, the standard dialect of British English is non-rhotic ...


9

According to John Kelly of the Washington Post (Catching the Sounds of the City), he claims: "warsh" is the predominant characteristic of what linguists call America's midland accent. The accent can be found in the swath of the country that extends west from Washington, taking in Maryland; southern Pennsylvania; West Virginia; parts of Virginia; southern ...


8

New Yorkers. Non-rhotic dialect? Yes. Dropping /h/ from /hju/-initial words? Yes. It's not just "something like" /ˈjumə/; that is the stereotypical New York City pronunciation of humor.


8

The noun user is pronounced /ju:zə/ in RP. Notice that unless it is followed by a vowel, there is no /r/ in this word. The verb use is pronounced /ju:z/. However, the noun use is pronounced /ju:s/. Notice that unlike the noun user the noun use has an /s/ and not a /z/. The words users, uses (verb) and uses (noun) are all very similar in English. But none ...


7

I'm from Worcester, I was born in Worcester. Common Worcester is a hybrid dialect of rural West Country with a substantial hint of Brummie/Black Country. Locals including myself naturally exaggerate R's or include invisible R's at the end of many words. The prenounciation for locals and yourself should simply be 'Wuster'. (Wuss-ter) 'Wustershear'. Easy. ...


6

The CMU Pronouncing Dictionary gives an American English pronunciation for linearly: http://www.speech.cs.cmu.edu/cgi-bin/cmudict/?in=linearly&stress=-s L IH1 N IY0 ER0 L IY0 In International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) this would be /ˈlɪniːɚliː/ In the American Heritage Dictionary-style pronunciation respelling it would be \lĭnēərlē\ In the Wikipedia ...


6

I can only offer this bit from the venerable alt.usage.english group: Many nonrhotic speakers (including RP speakers, but excluding most nonrhotic speakers in the southern U.S.) use a "linking r": they don't pronounce "r" in "for" by itself /fO:/, but they do pronounce the first "r" in "for ever" /fO: 'rEv@/. Linking "r" differs from French ...


6

The king who is known to have had a speech impediment was King George VI, father to the present Queen, who reigned from 1936 to 1952. The matter of his speech impediment was dramatised in the film The King's Speech (2010) written by David Seidler, in which Colin Firth plays the part of the King. This clearly has nothing to do with the formation of the ...


5

An alternative to LissyNumber's answer is "velarisation" associated with a "dark L". I supposed you could call this a velarising speaker.


5

Notice that when pronouncing, rabbit, barrow or ruler the lips are pushed outward forming a small "oh" shape, while when pronouncing heart the lips to do not move like while the tongue is pushed up against the inside face (lingual) of the upper teeth. Try pronouncing heart with the lips out forming an "oh" and see if that feels natural-- it doesn't. They ...


5

Expanding a little on the info above: The perception that American English and British English somehow developed largely independently after North America was colonized is not correct. Non-rhoticity started around London, then gradually spread northward and westward around England, and then spread to North America. In North America it started on the East and ...


5

A few accurate statements above, ie Australian is a blend of accents from all parts of the British Isle although admittedly it has a more east London sounding twang than anywhere else in Britain, but let me expand on that. Firstly there is no such thing as a British accent per say. The accent in the north east of England is as different from say Oxford in ...


5

They are not pronounced the same, even in non-rhotic dialects like RP. The noun use is pronounced with /s/, the verb use is pronounced with /z/: noun: /jus/, verb: /juz/ When these words are inflected with the -s affix many dictionaries represent the affix vowel with the 'schwa', /-əz/. However, the vowel actually used is somewhat higher; it may be ...


4

The Australian accent is a blend of the accents of the first white settlers who came from all over the UK (with a bit of attitude thrown in). See the Where did the Australian Accent Come from? documentary on YouTube for a further explanation.


4

Probably /'lɪnɪəlɪ/ (depending on your dialect of English). Four phonemes (sounds), anyway: LI-nee-uh-li. In fact, there is some pronunciation help online: http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/linear?q=linearly#linear__9 and it looks like ODO agrees with me as far as British English is concerned. Help on IPA symbols


4

I'm betting you can find this in a Scottish or Irish English accent. I'm no expert, but I would suggest looking at cat/caught/cot as a possible triple of those vowels. You'd have to find one that escaped the caught/cot merger, and that has a rather back variant of the BATH vowel. To wit: cat /kɑt/ caught /kɒt/ cot /kɔt/ In addition, most Scottish ...


4

Do these work? Sawed, sod and Sade. (Sade being the last name of Marquis de Sade.) Bought, bot and Baht. (Baht being the currency of Thailand.)


4

Mostly they're not recorded. They're called Hesitation Markers, or various equivalent names. They are the various sounds people make when they're hesitating to think of what to say next, or to remember a word, or just because they've drawn a blank. Emitting one of these markers signals an intention to hold the floor, and to try to keep one's conversation ...


4

This feature is called intrusive r, as others have pointed out. Bryan Gick, from Yale University, writes: Intrusion typically refers to the presence of a non-historical consonant between two heterosyllabic vowels. ... All dialects having intrusive r also seem to require two subordinate processes: r-vocalisation (the reduction or apparent complete loss of ...


4

An /ɝ/ is just the stressed version of an /ɚ/. For example, murder has both of them in it, being normally written as /ˈmɝdɚ/. Both of those are “r-colored” vowels. However, some transcribers prefer to represent that as /ˈmɜɹdəɹ/ instead, writing a consonant instead of little rhotic hook. Those represent the same pronunciation. Your mother is therefore ...


4

Rhotic English is a term to describes varieties of English in which orthographic 'r' is usually pronounced, even at the end of a syllable. In non-rhotic varieties of English - such as Southern Standard British English - orthographic 'r' is only pronounced if followed by a vowel. It doesn't matter if there is a double /r/ or not in the orthography: car / ka: ...


4

Though the generic Irish-English accent is rhotic (pronounces all 'r's), Supposedly, the accent in Dublin, where Joyce was born and raised, is (or was at that time?) non-rhotic. In that case, 'hoe' /hoʊ̯/ or /ho:/ and 'whore' /hoːɹ/ or /ho:/, are pretty close. Joyce, being well-educated, might have been explicitly writing for a more general British audience ...


3

I believe I’ve just discovered something that sheds light on this mystery. Peter Shore kindly pointed out this vowel chart, in which figure the following two charts (amongst others). First, the American one: And now the British one: This probably explains why it’s so hard for me to find a minimal triple, since General American has only two vowels there, ...


3

I have found the following triple, which however is only valid for non rhotic accents : bard /bɑːd/ bod /bɒd/ baud /bɔːd/


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