56

Paraphrase is the perfect word. To paraphrase Churchill, we will fight them everywhere. Or Paraphrasing Churchill, we will fight them everywhere. There are plenty of examples at Lexico. Or, less formally, you could use gist: He said, "We will fight them everywhere." That, at least, was his gist. Or He said, "We'll fight them all over ...


36

If you're looking for a similar saying in English, you could use: Actions speak louder than words. Which Cambridge Dictionary says means what you do is more important than what you say, because the things you do show your true intentions and feelings.


26

The French proverb implies that the expression of love indicates the sole reality of love. The proof is in the pudding implies that the real worth, success, or effectiveness of something can only be determined by putting it to the test by trying or using it, appearances and promises aside—just as the best test of a pudding is to eat it. (source: M-W) --- ...


25

I am assuming both "Why Latin?" and "Waste of time" are actual quotes (probably from disgruntled Latin students.) As such, I would keep them between quotation marks. There are no hard and fast rules about whether the pluralizing 's' should go inside or outside the closing quotation mark. In my opinion, it should go outside so the quoted phrase (or title) ...


22

Are you using a particular style guide that indicates you should do this? Otherwise, no, don't use sic. Using it here would lead the reader to believe that 8 is the wrong number and maybe the author actually meant 10 hours. In APA format for example, sic is not used with things like British spellings, even if they can't be used outside of quotes. Actually,...


16

I'd probably italicize rather than using quotation marks, and hyphenate the phrases in question. Something like this: "Her constant barrage of what-ifs and when-will-wes made the trip tiresome."


15

Your third example is correct. Quotes are composed of two parts; the speaker tag to identify the speaker, and the actual quote itself. For example: Einstein said "A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new." Or for your example: Sally said "I went to the movies." But you can also paraphrase what they said and integrate it into the ...


15

The "rule" is to alternate quote marks. You can start with doubles or singles on the outside, following whatever style guide you prefer, but then alternate. I prefer to start with double-quotes, which means that the next set is single and then double after that, and so on. John exclaimed, “I was really annoyed when Julia said ‘Leave now if you want to see ...


15

It means that some people are unteachable: so dense or so close-minded that they are incapable of comprehending or accepting what you tell them unless it conforms to what they already know or believe. Incidentally, this Yogi-ism is often attributed to Louis Armstrong, probably through confusion with what Satchmo is said to have told somebody who asked him ...


15

The word I've heard used for this on the linguistics blog Language Log is snowclone (it's derived from phrases of the format "If Eskimos have N words for snow, X surely have Y words for Z.") Here's a Language Log post that describes the moment the word was coined and that links to some examples: Snowclones: Lexicographical Dating to the Second And here's ...


15

talk is cheap From https://grammarist.com/idiom/talk-is-cheap/ : The phrase talk is cheap means it is easier to talk about doing something than to actually do that thing. Many people say they will do something but never do it. The expression talk is cheap may be seen as a challenge to accomplish something, but it is usually a commentary that ...


14

What Franklin didn't say Like FumbleFingers, I can't find any attribution of the quoted language to Franklin before about the turn of the twenty-first century. (A Google Books search finds one instance from the year 2000, in 2001 Librarian's Engagement Calendar and Almanac.) On the other hand I did find the following quotation attributed to another popular ...


13

Eighteenth-century attempts to clarify the source of italics in quotations Google Books searches for various phrases containing italics or emphasis uncover two attempts from the late 1700s to distinguish between italics or other special typographic treatments that appeared in the original version of a quotation and emphatic typography that the quoting author ...


13

It may have something to do with the rather archaic practice of: - “Using a “quotation mark at the “beginning of every line “of the quoted text. This “practise was actually “pretty commonplace during “the Georgian and Victo- “ian Eras.” See, for example, this 1759 edition of The Monthly Review on Google Books. (cf. Wikipedia article)


12

A preliminary digression Although I want to provide a useful answer to the poster's specific question, I must first point out the inaccuracy of Dougvj's answer. According to that answer, the phrase "We can predict everything, except the future" may originate in a longer block of observations about the future— The future isn't what it used to be. ...


12

"Please welcome" — he pauses for effect — "our very own John Smith!"


11

I have been searching for the same as the OP. More searching has revealed this in the U.S. Government Printing Office Style Manual (I have not read the whole of it, so I might be misinterpreting it): 16.17. Signatures, preceded by an em dash, are sometimes run in with last line of text. UPDATE (2019-10-01) There appears to be a PDF render of the ...


11

Paraphrase is perfectly good here, and probably the most natural choice in most written contexts e.g. Paraphrasing Oscar Wilde, "truth isn't pure or simple" You could also caveat the word "quote" with suitable hedges. The suggestions in the question ("keeping with the sense", "in spirit", and "conceptually")...


10

Although the first version in each case is closer to being appropriate, neither is completely correct. The sentences should be formatted as follows: "There were more?" asked Wendy. "He was amazing!" exclaimed Billy. Although question and exclamation marks normally end a sentence, if they come before a quotation mark in the middle of mixed dialogue ...


10

One interesting feature of this quotation is that it began appearing with some regularity, usually attributed to Lincoln, in the middle 1890s, some three decades after Lincoln's death (April 15, 1865). Another is that most of the earliest citations specifically attribute the quotation to Lincoln. A third is that, even at that early period, a key element of ...


10

I don't know why you've concluded you can't use "sic" in academic writing. The term simply means that you're quoting the source material verbatim. Wang concluded that "A tend to choosed [sic] B". But "[sic]" can make it seem like you're calling attention to an error, and it sounds like you're especially sensitive to this ...


9

I'd advise using 'sic' only when the reader might otherwise doubt whether a word or phrase was being quoted correctly.


8

Your example seems to refer to an epigraph, which is a short passage normally used at the start of a book or chapter. There is no "single" answer. It depends entirely on the style guide or in-house style manual. The Chicago Manual of Style (13.36) says that An author may wish to include an epigraph—a quotation that is pertinent but not integral to the ...


8

Wayne Gretzky appears to be the earliest attributed source of this particular expression, although two older sports-related expression say much the same thing: "You can't score if you don't shoot" and "You can't hit the ball if you don't swing." Here are the entries for those three expressions in Charles Doyle, Wolfgang Mieder & Fred ...


8

It appears Ford at least took inspiration for the quote from Walden by Henry David Thoreau. In a 1916 edition of The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the phrase hung over Ford's fireplace is attributed as a quote from Henry David Thoreau. St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 1916 (paywall link) The closest I can find to the original quote by Thoreau is this paraphrasing in ...


8

Bartlett Whiting, Early American Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases (1977) has this entry: Wood warms a man twice 1819 Kinloch Letters 1.460: The proverb of the country is, that wood warms a man twice. Barbour 65: Firewood. The Kinloch reference is to Letter LVI in Francis Kinloch, Letters from Geneva and France: Written During a Residence of Between Two and ...


8

The standard way of doing this is to put a quote mark at the start of each paragraph, but if a quote continues to the next paragraph, don't close the quote until it really ends. "The next period in the history of English was Early Modern English (1500–1700). Early Modern English was characterised by the Great Vowel Shift (1350–1700), inflectional ...


7

If you are supplying a direct quote, you quote the subject exactly. If you are paraphrasing, then you can change the pronouns to make things more consistent. An example of a direct quote: When asked what he did last night, Dave said "I was at the movies." Paraphrased, it would look like this: When I asked Dave what he did last night, he said he was ...


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