65 votes
Accepted

Do I need to write [sic] when including a quotation with a number less than 10 that isn't written out?

No, because whether to write numerals or to spell them out is a point of style, not grammar.
Benjamin Harman's user avatar
57 votes

What's a positive phrase to say that I quoted something not word by word

Paraphrase is the perfect word. To paraphrase Churchill, we will fight them everywhere. Or Paraphrasing Churchill, we will fight them everywhere. There are plenty of examples at Lexico. Or, less ...
Old Brixtonian's user avatar
36 votes

Translate the French quote "Il n’y a pas d'amour, il n’y a que des preuves d’amour" to English?

If you're looking for a similar saying in English, you could use: Actions speak louder than words. Which Cambridge Dictionary says means what you do is more important than what you say, because ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
25 votes

Weird situation - using quotes as nouns and making them plural (APA format)

I am assuming both "Why Latin?" and "Waste of time" are actual quotes (probably from disgruntled Latin students.) As such, I would keep them between quotation marks. There are no hard and fast rules ...
pablopaul's user avatar
  • 1,290
25 votes
Accepted

Translate the French quote "Il n’y a pas d'amour, il n’y a que des preuves d’amour" to English?

The French proverb implies that the expression of love indicates the sole reality of love. The proof is in the pudding implies that the real worth, success, or effectiveness of something can only be ...
rajah9's user avatar
  • 16.2k
22 votes

Do I need to write [sic] when including a quotation with a number less than 10 that isn't written out?

Are you using a particular style guide that indicates you should do this? Otherwise, no, don't use sic. Using it here would lead the reader to believe that 8 is the wrong number and maybe the author ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.1k
16 votes

Weird situation - using quotes as nouns and making them plural (APA format)

I'd probably italicize rather than using quotation marks, and hyphenate the phrases in question. Something like this: "Her constant barrage of what-ifs and when-will-wes made the trip tiresome."
barbecue's user avatar
  • 6,586
15 votes

Translate the French quote "Il n’y a pas d'amour, il n’y a que des preuves d’amour" to English?

talk is cheap From https://grammarist.com/idiom/talk-is-cheap/ : The phrase talk is cheap means it is easier to talk about doing something than to actually do that thing. Many people say they ...
k1eran's user avatar
  • 22.6k
12 votes
Accepted

Who first said "We can predict everything, except the future"?

A preliminary digression Although I want to provide a useful answer to the poster's specific question, I must first point out the inaccuracy of Dougvj's answer. According to that answer, the phrase &...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
12 votes

Appropriate dash to use when attributing a quotation?

Your example seems to refer to an epigraph, which is a short passage normally used at the start of a book or chapter. There is no "single" answer. It depends entirely on the style guide or in-house ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
12 votes

What's a positive phrase to say that I quoted something not word by word

Paraphrase is perfectly good here, and probably the most natural choice in most written contexts e.g. Paraphrasing Oscar Wilde, "truth isn't pure or simple" You could also caveat the word &...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 863
10 votes

I need help with quotations and punctuation

Although the first version in each case is closer to being appropriate, neither is completely correct. The sentences should be formatted as follows: "There were more?" asked Wendy. "He was ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
10 votes

Do I need to write [sic] when including a quotation with a number less than 10 that isn't written out?

I'd advise using 'sic' only when the reader might otherwise doubt whether a word or phrase was being quoted correctly.
Philip Wood's user avatar
10 votes

Origin of the saying "God must love the poor because he made so many of them"

One interesting feature of this quotation is that it began appearing with some regularity, usually attributed to Lincoln, in the middle 1890s, some three decades after Lincoln's death (April 15, 1865)....
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
10 votes

Grammatically wrong quote

I don't know why you've concluded you can't use "sic" in academic writing. The term simply means that you're quoting the source material verbatim. Wang concluded that "A tend to ...
Chemomechanics's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

What was the first use of the saying, "You miss 100% of the shots you don't take"

Wayne Gretzky appears to be the earliest attributed source of this particular expression, although two older sports-related expression say much the same thing: "You can't score if you don't shoot&...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
9 votes
Accepted

Is it proper to use "it's" as an abbreviation for "it has"?

The sic does not appear in the article as currently posted by the New York Times. The sentence is grammatical as stands, that is, as quoted. Why a sic was there is beyond the ken of most educated ...
Arm the good guys in America's user avatar
8 votes

What is the origin of the phrase "History teaches, never trust a Cecil"?

I have only a rather obvious and unsatisfying bit of research to offer, but as no one has previously cited a contemporaneous news item regarding the expression "Never trust a Cecil" as it ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
8 votes

When was the first print usage of "Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice."

It appears Ford at least took inspiration for the quote from Walden by Henry David Thoreau. In a 1916 edition of The St. Louis Post-Dispatch, the phrase hung over Ford's fireplace is attributed as a ...
RaceYouAnytime's user avatar
8 votes

When was the first print usage of "Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice."

Bartlett Whiting, Early American Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases (1977) has this entry: Wood warms a man twice 1819 Kinloch Letters 1.460: The proverb of the country is, that wood warms a man twice. ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
7 votes

How are bracket ellipsis [...] used in quotations?

The Chicago Manual of Style (16th ed.) discusses square brackets with ellipses in 13.56. It indicates that in some languages (especially French [11.35]), ellipses are used more commonly than in ...
Chuck Bumgardner's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

What does "[arête]" mean, inside of a quote?

This addition in square brackets is not supposed to be part of the running text; it is a note to inform the reader that the term moral excellence was chosen by the translator to represent the Greek ...
Cerberus - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
7 votes

Grammatically wrong quote

With academic work today, accuracy is non-negotiable. It is not acceptable to present modified work as if the original author wrote it that way. The three main ways to handle corrections of obvious ...
Lawrence's user avatar
  • 38.5k
7 votes
Accepted

How to use quotation marks when quoting more than one paragraphs?

The standard way of doing this is to put a quote mark at the start of each paragraph, but if a quote continues to the next paragraph, don't close the quote until it really ends. "The next period ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
  • 101k
5 votes

When was the first print usage of "Chop your own wood and it will warm you twice."

The first print uses of the adage (variants) that I found appeared in Walden (1854, as reproduced in a prior answer), and in Thorn Cottage, a Poet's Home: A Memorial of Frederick Knight, Esq., of ...
JEL's user avatar
  • 32.8k
5 votes

Translate the French quote "Il n’y a pas d'amour, il n’y a que des preuves d’amour" to English?

A classic: "You talk the talk; do you walk the walk?"
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
5 votes

Is it OK to add my explanation to a quotation?

Inserting a few explanatory words is fine, but you should use square brackets instead of parentheses. Just take care not to alter the original text's meaning. Writing Commons offers the following: ...
stacknik's user avatar
  • 126
4 votes
Accepted

What are standard ways for an editor to specify he is making a correction?

According to Wikipedia, you would use sic. For your correction you would use recte: Alternatively, when both the original and the suggested correction are desired to be shown, one may give the actual ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.1k

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