23 votes

Is it ever correct to have a space before a question or exclamation mark?

People have mentioned in the comments that, yes, in the past, a small (non-breaking) space was inserted before an ! and a ? These must never start a new line. The space is also a small space, very ...
user avatar
  • 1,648
20 votes

Is it ever correct to have a space before a question or exclamation mark?

The Chicago Manual of Style recommends a nonbreakable space before and after an ellipsis when the intention is to trail off a sentence. 13.52 Ellipses with other punctuation. Placement of the other ...
user avatar
  • 7,002
18 votes

What does a question mark inside parentheses (?) mean?

(?) is simply a passing note of incertitude at the preceding word (sometimes phrase). I am the tallest(?) in our class Here this usage indicates that the author is not sure if he/she is really ...
user avatar
  • 374
14 votes

Do I need a comma after this question mark?

Chicago's position The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th edition (2003) asserts this broad rule against combining question marks (or exclamation points) and commas (or periods): 6.123 When to omit ...
user avatar
  • 152k
9 votes

Is there a difference between “?!” and “!?”?

?! is emphasizing a question. !? is questioning an emphasis. I don't know why anyone would add an emphasis only to undercut it in the next mark, so I've never thought "!?" has any validity. EDIT: ...
user avatar
7 votes

How should I punctuate around quotes where the punctuation required by the quote interferes with the punctuation of the sentence?

I find this entire discussion quite intriguing, to be honest. Assuming that most people will come here looking for guidance on a rather non-complex scale: The American convention for punctuation of ...
user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Do I need a comma after this question mark?

What does your style manual say? The Chicago Manual of Style makes this a typographical issue, noting that when two different marks appear at the same location, only the stronger is retained. (...
user avatar
  • 44k
6 votes

Is it ever correct to have a space before a question or exclamation mark?

When you end a sentence with a link In modern usage, especially online, one time where it is appropriate to put a space is when you are ending the sentence with a link https://ux.stackexchange.com/...
user avatar
  • 2,169
6 votes
Accepted

Confused in the usage of "where" in a non-interrogative sentence

Your sentence is irreproachable. It would mean exactly the same if the relative where clause were at the end: Justice prevails where peace prevails. except for a difference in emphasis. It's like ...
user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Placement of question mark for a question quoting a question

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-punctuate-quotations-with-question-marks.html Some of you detail-oriented (okay, picky) people may want to know what to do when the quotation and the ...
user avatar
  • 66
5 votes

How should a question ending in a statement be punctuated, as ending it in a question mark seems a little off?

Style-guide recommendations This is a punctuation/style question, so the relevant guidance amounts to recommendations that may or may not be consistent from one style manual to the next. If you like (...
user avatar
  • 152k
5 votes
Accepted

How should a question which quotes a question be punctuated?

One clue is how this is said. The question mark is a written indication of spoken intonation. The quoted question is not phrased as a question, with rising intonation. It's said as though its ...
user avatar
  • 95.5k
4 votes

Is the question mark misused in affirmative sentences?

Just for the sake of anyone reading, I found this thread when I googled about this issue because Microsoft Word grammar checker tried to tell me that I should put a question mark at the end of this ...
user avatar
  • 41
4 votes
Accepted

Does the phrase "if that's fine with you" require a question mark?

You can use either. Without the question mark, it really means "assuming that's ok with you", which doesn't require an answer. You're saying "I'm assuming it's ok with you.", and the other person ...
user avatar
  • 22.8k
4 votes
Accepted

Question mark followed by a comma or semi colon in a list

Punctuation is a matter of style, and as such you should be guided by your manual of style, either the one you've chosen or the one thrust upon you. I use the Chicago Manual of Style, which advises ...
user avatar
  • 44k
4 votes

What does a question mark inside parentheses (?) mean?

I haven't seen the use of "(?)" in any book or news article for example, I would say it's something used in an informal context. But yes, I'd say it showcases the author's insecurity with respect to ...
user avatar
  • 53
3 votes

"Scare quotes" and placement of question mark--inside or outside?

It definitely belongs outside the quotes. The ? is in the scope of the sentence, but outside the scope of your emphasis on stuff. <-- period goes outside, see?
user avatar
  • 276
3 votes
Accepted

Do I use a period or a question mark at the end of a statement that presents a question?

Actually, the more correct choice of punctuation is the former. When you are asking an indirect question, you end a sentence with a period. It is really a declarative sentence that reports a question,...
user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Is it appropriate to use question marks in email?

If it's a question, you should use a question mark: Could you give me an appointment to meet you regarding this matter? If anything, leaving out a question mark from a question could make it seem ...
user avatar
  • 65.9k
3 votes

When is it appropriate to end a question without a question mark?

The Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) identifies three distinct categories of questions that do not take question marks, at least in some instances: indirect questions, indirect one-...
user avatar
  • 152k
3 votes
Accepted

Has the request “May I request you to …” to end with a question mark?

You really have two problems. The first is a matter of punctuation, and as such this is a matter of style, so the answer to it will depend on what manual of style you use. Mine is the Chicago Manual ...
user avatar
  • 44k
3 votes

Proper punctuation for compound sentence with quote that is a question

Punctuation is a matter of style, and as such you should be guided by your manual of style. I use the Chicago Manual of Style, which recommends that "interrogative elements" within a sentence should ...
user avatar
  • 44k
3 votes
Accepted

Should a suggestion have a question mark?

This is a rhetorical question: A rhetorical question is asked just for effect or to lay emphasis on some point discussed when no real answer is expected. A rhetorical question may have an obvious ...
user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Help settle an argument, question mark placement

Both are grammatical, but they come across differently. I'll illustrate by setting the sentences if they came from the script for a (poorly written) play. ... CARPENTER: Welcome to today's lessons ...
user avatar
  • 37.7k
3 votes
Accepted

Where do I put the question mark if a question has a parenthetical statement at the end?

The rule with the highest precedence here is that any content within parentheses must be removable without altering the grammar of the surrounding content. If it can't be, then something somewhere ...
user avatar
  • 5,974
3 votes

Where to put question mark in sentences with two statements

"Especially since fame brings a bunch of problems" is at best a fragment: it doesn't seem like a complete sentence. I guess this is the source of the question. As you say, the question ...
user avatar
  • 95.5k
3 votes

Is it possible to make a declarative sentence starting with 'Can'?

Your example sentence is more nearly imperative than declarative, but whatever terminology you apply to it, it isn't a normal interrogative form, and—at least according to The Chicago Manual of Style, ...
user avatar
  • 152k
3 votes

Is it possible to make a declarative sentence starting with 'Can'?

Of course we can do so: "Can" is a modal auxiliary verb. Can pigs fly is a question that puzzles me. However, you are probably interested in situations in which "can" is not used ...
user avatar
2 votes

Is there a difference between “?!” and “!?”?

I prefer "?!" because the first punctuation, "?", logically and correctly frames the sentence as a question. The punctuation, "!", merely adds emphasis to the question being asked, as if to imply, "...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible