12

Nested quotes can go on forever. So you can, in theory, have a countable infinity of contiguous punctuation symbols.


4

“The not-so-secret secret to weight loss.” In this case, “not-so-secret” is the adjective describing the “secret to weight loss.” No commas.


4

None of the real-world examples you give are grammatically incorrect. For instance, the first example you give is: One of the most notorious examples of a crime that wasn't is the case of O.J. Simpson and the 1994 murder of his wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman. O.J. Simpson was charged and tried for the crime and, after a year-long ...


4

Usages 1, 4, and 5 are correct, and so is the sentence with no punctuation on either side of the phrase "among others". Also, great question! :) The thing is, any kind of bracketing effect is acceptable. And that is exactly what is done by making use of a pair of commas, brackets, or m-dashes. These are all bracketing devices. So long as the sentence is ...


4

I've never seen anyone use a dot that way before, and I've never seen a style guide saying that it's acceptable to use a dot that way. Just use quotation marks: This is an abridged version of the brochure "Progressive Fuel Distribution to Service Station Networks" intended for representatives of fuel retail or fuel transport companies interested in ...


4

Old English had full-stop punctuation in some manuscripts, but did not have regular sentence-beginning capitalization. According to Introduction to Manuscript Studies, by Raymond Clemens & Timothy Graham (Cornell UP, 2007), the punctus, the forerunner of modern periods and commas, would have been present in manuscripts in Latin during the Old English ...


4

Either comma or colon is fine to use after the phrase "for example". Typically, a comma is used. When a more "significant" separation is desired, a colon may be used. Notably, if using a colon in your sample usage, the word that immediately follows should be capitalized since it starts a new sentence. The research centre will use confidence intervals as ...


3

In the first example, rules for reported speech allow for the quotation mark or exclamation point within the quote to stay. The Chicago Style Guide provides this example in 6:10: Other punctuation in relation to closing quotation marks: “What’s the rush?” she wondered. If the question mark or exclamation point is part of the quoted material, put it ...


3

This is a matter of style, so it's not possible to give a definitive answer on what the correct use is. Different style guides, and different people, will use dashes in different ways. Having said that, it's generally been the case that more British style guides will say to not use an em dash but, where US style would use an em dash, to use an en dash that'...


3

The way you've punctuated it is fine, but note that the traditional treatment for a shortened word is to use a full stop (AmE: period) for abbreviations (where the end of the word has been removed) but not for contractions (where letters in the middle of the word have been omitted). Hence: Doctor: Dr Professor: Prof. Reverend: Rev. Reverend: ...


3

I think it's correct to leave it as-is with no punctuation, but I understand why you might not like it. I have worked around this in the past by making something else happen in the sentence. For example, you could have a dramatic pause: "Is Greg...Dr. Jones?" This tends to be how people would say such a thing in real life anyway (at least in my opinion), ...


3

Here is the relevant portion of the original sentence: Its long, damp passages, its narrow cells and ruined chapel, were to be within her daily reach. I would interpret it in this way: Its long, damp passages (its narrow cells and ruined chapel) were to be within her daily reach. → Its long, damp passages were to be within her daily reach. In ...


3

I don't think a single comma would be acceptable, as it would separate "If" from the condition making the reduced sentence: [If for any reason,] you are not 100% satisfied with the quality of our services, we will refund 100% of your money back. This sentence does not make sense. (I would also add the percent sign after 100). However, if you can use ...


3

As noted in the following extract, there are instances where question marks are omitted, especially if the sentence implies a suggestion or a request: Sentences that begin with Why don’t you(I, we) or Why not are primarily interrogatives, and they normally take question marks. A large number of these instances are used with question marks, but some of ...


3

I would write either Sep 25, 2019 at 20:59 or 20:59 on Sep 25, 2019 For the British date style there is no comma needed to separate 25 Sep 2019 at 20:59 or 20:59 on 25 Sep 2019


3

Indeed, as you so reference, the OED provides 5 sample sentences with various iterations of (D)dragon('s)(s) teeth: 1644 J. Milton Areopagitica 4 They are as lively, and as vigorously productive, as those fabulous Dragons teeth. 1853 J. B. Marsden Hist. Early Puritans (ed. 2) 290 Jesuits..sowed the dragon's teeth which sprung up into ...


3

Many years ago, various prominent U.S. style guides used to recommend using gothic (sans serif) type in otherwise roman (serif) text to indicate a letter-as-shape letter, but I haven't seen this done in practice very often in recent years. In fact, as early as Words into Type, third edition (1974), style guides were already moving away from the gothic ...


3

I think it is correct to put a comma there. The comma separates Finally, the populations of Russia and Turkey did not show any alterations, which is the main clause, from either positive or negative, which is a non-defining relative clause (which adds extra information but can be removed without losing the meaning of the sentence). Quoting from https://www....


3

You can also use the word layman about which Lexico says layman NOUN 2 A person without professional or specialized knowledge in a particular subject. the book seems well suited to the interested layman


2

The last explanation here is the most to the point: go by a manual of style. However, the example is an incorrect rendering of the Chicago manual. First, the answer to your question is "no"--with the exception of the hyphen (as you see here, a quotation mark followed by a hyphen). Second, since the sentence which has the questions within it is not a question,...


2

They wanted to reduce bugs, blue screens, and viruses. They wanted to decrease the amount of bugs, blue screens, and viruses.


2

Could it be a question of phonetics? In wouldn't, we know that we have to insert a "schwa" or "mid central vowel", IPA ə, i.e. the most non-descript vowel possible, and very common in English, somewhere. In wouldn't this sound doesn't actually come where the apostrophe is, but instead between the d and the n. The reason for putting it where it is references ...


2

If the apostrophe in "ar't" is simply an error by the author, it is not the only one on this page. For example, I note three occurrences of the word "did[']st"—two without an apostrophe (didst) and one with an apostrophe (did'st). The presence or absence of the apostrophe in the case of didst is arguably acceptable either way—since didst could be read as a ...


2

Your sentence: Please first look at our wiki space or contact your local site-ops before opening a ticket, if you would like us to look into an issue, or have a change request, please open a JIRA ticket. As it is, your sentence is both a comma splice and a run-on sentence. Let's punctuate it a little better. That involves changing a run-on sentence into ...


2

There is no need for a comma in this sentence. However, the section from 'I received..." onward is not an independent sentence; in fact, "the laptop repair service I received from your service center" is a noun phrase, so there is no benefit to putting a comma in to break it up. You could say 'that I received', or (better in my opinion) 'which I received......


2

In a sentence like this, you only need to place a comma between 'large' and 'complex' - i.e. "Humans are a large, complex organism". (As a matter of clarity, though, I'd omit the article 'a' and make 'organism' plural - i.e. "Humans are large, complex organisms" - otherwise you imply that the whole collective of humans are one huge organism.


2

Let's be a bit more descriptive than prescriptive about our grammar rules... If you're writing the sentence, you get to decide how you're saying it. As long as what you're writing matches what you're trying to say, you're good. Commas represent pauses in speech. In comparison to a period, they're shorter, and imply the two statements aren't really ...


2

The point of the question is not to set history straight but to test one's understanding of parenthetical commas. Each answer differs in the placement of commas so as to set off the name of the scientist for special consideration. If you imagine the sentence read out loud you can hear how the commas function as pauses in speech to describe secondary ...


2

The comma is placed appropriately in example 1. The clause "I try my best to dispel hate" is obviously modified by the which (relative) clause that follows it. However, note that the which clause is a non-restrictive clause and also a modifier. As a conventional rule, modifiers certainly need to be very close to the ideas they modify, which is properly ...


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