47

In a comment posted years ago to the question Why is "biblical" the only proper adjective to not use upper case? I listed some other exceptions to the general rule that the first letter of an adjective derived from a proper name is normally capitalized. Only the letters q, w, x, and y did not yield an example (for some reason, I failed to notice ...


41

The simple answer is... Alfred Tennyson was created a hereditary baron, 1st Baron Tennyson. Barons are known by their title, Lord Tennyson, preceded if necessary by their Christian name. The same applies to current Life Barons, who are not created with hereditary titles. Thus it's John, Lord Prescott of Kingston-upon-Hull. Sons of hereditary peers are ...


37

TL;DR: Yes. The hymn “O Come, All Ye Faithful” was originally in Latin, and even today is still often sung that way under the title “Adeste Fideles”. We are not certain who wrote its original tune or lyrics, although this was probably in the 1700s or perhaps the 1600s. We do know, however, that it was translated into English in 1841 by a Catholic priest. ...


29

It seems that the current consensus is “don’t change” (-ys). Swan 2005 cautiously says that "proper nouns usually [emphasis mine - Alex B.] have ys". the Kennedys (not the Kennedies) There’s a punk band, Dead Kennedys http://www.deadkennedys.com/; there’s also aTV show, The Kennedys. the Willoughbys the Wolfs (not the Wolves) the Henrys the two ...


28

As you correctly say, technically words associated with a proper noun should be capitalized. However as time and usage goes on, these words tend to become words in their own right, not associated any more with the person they are named after. So 'Shakespearean' means 'associated with or like Shakespeare'. It has no meaning apart from the association with ...


27

The de Havilland Moth was a line of airplanes manufactured in the 1920's and 1930's. Since they are talking about airplanes, and the book was published in 1932, that may be the answer. According to Wikipedia: Every light aircraft flying in the UK was commonly referred to as a 'Moth', regardless if it was de Havilland-built or not.


27

In short: The supervisor's edit is ungrammatical because it uses two Determiners within the same immediate noun phrase. As shown below, this is ungrammatical in modern English: *the my car The full story: the slimy dinosaurs Noun phrases come in two chunks. They have a Determiner and a Head. In (1) above, the Determiner is the word the, and the Head is ...


25

I would say that strictly speaking it is not. Irregular plurals carry if they are instances of the base word. A "fireman" is a type of man, so "firemen" is the appropriate plural, but the "Toronto Maple Leafs" are not leaves. Since Batman is a proper noun, Batman does not designate a type of man but the name for one particular man, so the irregular plural ...


24

Why is Uzi capitalized? It comes from a name, and people haven't frequently used it in lowercase in publication. First, the name is derived from a person's name. These usually retain their capitalization. For example, we have: Tommy gun, or the Thompson submachine gun, for inventor John T. Thompson (Wikipedia) Molly or Molotov cocktail, in mockery of ...


22

The indeterminate a here implies that the speaker - and probably the listener as well - do not actually know Mr. Alan Lloyd and Mrs. Millie Preston. They're just names on the will, not actual people they are familiar with. The use of the a here means that this person could be any Alan Lloyd out there, since there isn't a concrete person to refer to. This is ...


22

When it is their name, Mom and Dad would be capitalised: Dear Mom and Dad, I am just writing to let you know, that although everyone has a mom and a >dad, you are my special mom and dad. So, Mom, I just want to say ‘brava!’; and Dad, ‘bravo!’. I’ve just been telling Sis, that Mom’s new coat is so cool. XX Here's the commentary from an exercise ...


21

People do say it, but that doesn't make it right or that you should repeat it. People will probably understand what you mean, but it sounds wrong to me. Ask instead: "Do you have a Facebook account?" "Are you on Facebook?" "Do you use Facebook?" And note Facebook should be capitalised. Finally, the website Facebook was named after the face book or ...


20

I would not capitalize "apartheid". None of the dictionaries I have checked capitalize it as a headword (MW, AHD, Collins, Oxford). Capitalization, like punctuation, is one of the less settled areas of English orthography. I somewhat doubt that there is any definite answer about whether it is "correct" or "incorrect" to capitalize this word, so I won't ...


19

The official rule is: if it acts as a singular unit, it gets a singular congugation; if it acts as a group of individuals viewed individually, it gets a plural congugation. There is no difference between common and proper nouns. For example, Seventy dollars is too much to spend on a DVD. (The seventy dollars is one unit) In relation to the example above, ...


19

Short answer - you are right, your supervisor is wrong. However he could have said "Here, we will use the Kukhtarev model to describe the ..." The possessive is not used in this version. So it's either "Kukhtarev's model" or "the Kukhtarev model"


18

Edit: This first bit was after my not grokking the question. I'm leaving it anyway. Proper answer follows Christen does not mean "to make Christian", it means "to anoint with oil", which is part of the Christian naming rite. (Christ is from the same root, meaning "anointed one"). Sain is sometimes used of people being named in religious rites without it ...


17

Here's a list including those in Jon's answer: Christianity Judas Greek Amuse Aphrodisiac: Arousing or intensifying sexual desire (from the goddess, Aphrodite) Apollonian: Clear, harmonious, and restrained. (from the god, Apollo) Dionysian: wild, irrational, and undisciplined (from the god, Dionysus) Echo: a reflected sound heard again from its ...


16

<H> is a letter that's used in English largely to modify other letters, like <TH>, used for both /ð/ and /θ/, <SH> for /ʃ/, and <CH> for /tʃ/. This is for native English words that may have been borrowed centuries ago, but now are felt to be English. In proper names from other languages, like Afghanistan, Baghdad, and Lamborghini, we are not ...


15

Whether there is a plural form depends entirely on whether there is actually a singular form. In the case of WordPress, there isn't a singular form. You don't say “I implemented my blog as a WordPress.” It’s using WordPress or even on WordPress or in WordPress, but not as a WordPress. Consequently there is no plural form. This doesn't apply to all ...


15

In English the word most matching your usage is Dinosaur a fossil reptile of the Mesozoic era, often reaching an enormous size. a person or thing that is outdated or has become obsolete because of failure to adapt to changing circumstances. For example I love my dinosaur phone The real reason I haven’t upgraded my phone – even though it ...


14

I'd call this a jetty myself. Pier isn't wrong, but tends to imply a more magnificent structure than that shown.


14

Stylistically, the phrase "to hear a King proclaim..." echoes the previous construction "to hear a preacher say...." The repetition of the indefinite article maintains the flow of the speech. (Imagine how awkward it would have sounded if, in place of "to hear a King proclaim," Obama had said "to hear the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaim....") Of ...


14

No, you should not. Even Sir Tim Berners-Lee does not: 1991 T. Berners-Lee WorldWideWeb: Summary in comp.archives (Usenet newsgroup) 9 Aug., The WWW world consists of documents, and links... The web contains documents in many formats. OED does say "usually with initial capital", and then goes on to say Originally written with a capital initial, ...


14

We should capitalize these words if they are being used as the name of the person. You can capitalize these when referring to your own relatives: Hello, Mother. When you use mom/dad in general meaning father/mother, it's a common noun. So do not capitalize them when they follow possessive pronouns such as her, his, my, our, your. (my mother ~ my mom ) A ...


14

Since you asked for a linguistics answer, here goes. First of all, it's incorrect to assume that linguistics assumes that there are proper noun and common noun categories to begin with, that all languages contain and distinguish between. Lay ideas of grammar don't necessarily correspond to linguistic ones. A linguistic analysis of proper nouns proposes ...


14

The Wizard of (the land of) Oz, actual name Oscar Zoroaster Phadrig Isaac Norman Henkle Emmannuel Ambroise Diggs (shortened to OZ exc. pinhead ) hailed according to the story from America not Australia. Baum is reported as saying that the name "OZ" came from his file cabinet labeled "O–Z".[1] Strictly speaking since Baum did not originally intend for The ...


13

More generally, using an article before a proper noun that doesn't have one built into it (as the United States and the Rolling Stones do) is one example of using a proper noun as a countable noun. There are several reasons why we might do that normally. One is to say something like "there are three Johns in the group", meaning "there are three people ...


13

In the context you have, I would capitalize it, because it refers to a specific period in history. However, if you were to use the word not as the name of a period, but to refer to the phenomenon, as in the sentences below, it shouldn’t be capitalized. 1. He hated apartheid as a policy. 2. A certain class reaped the benefits of apartheid without ever ...


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