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58

Most of the names you give are derived from proper place names, or clan names, or such, so using "human" as a comparison is not accurate. For instance, Vulcan and Minbari are named for their planets. We would capitalize Terran likewise (or Earthling or Martian). Also Krell, Nox, and Timelord are groups of peoples (my apologies for not using a panxenic ...


47

In a comment posted years ago to the question Why is "biblical" the only proper adjective to not use upper case? I listed some other exceptions to the general rule that the first letter of an adjective derived from a proper name is normally capitalized. Only the letters q, w, x, and y did not yield an example (for some reason, I failed to notice ...


41

The simple answer is... Alfred Tennyson was created a hereditary baron, 1st Baron Tennyson. Barons are known by their title, Lord Tennyson, preceded if necessary by their Christian name. The same applies to current Life Barons, who are not created with hereditary titles. Thus it's John, Lord Prescott of Kingston-upon-Hull. Sons of hereditary peers are ...


40

Azure is also an ordinary English word, pronounced the same way (or rather, ways) as the Microsoft program software offering. The two main pronunciations differ in how they say the 'z': in US English, it almost always becomes a zh /ʒ/, like the s in measure, while in the UK, it can be either a zh /ʒ/, same as in the US, or a straight z /z/. There's also ...


37

TL;DR: Yes. The hymn “O Come, All Ye Faithful” was originally in Latin, and even today is still often sung that way under the title “Adeste Fideles”. We are not certain who wrote its original tune or lyrics, although this was probably in the 1700s or perhaps the 1600s. We do know, however, that it was translated into English in 1841 by a Catholic priest. ...


31

There are certain countries and regions which are traditionally referred to with the definite article: anywhere where the proper name is a description (The United States, The Gold Coast, The Windward Isles), but also certain names which are not (The Ukraine, The Punjab, The Gambia, The Argentine). Some which were traditionally used this way are no longer: "...


29

As you correctly say, technically words associated with a proper noun should be capitalized. However as time and usage goes on, these words tend to become words in their own right, not associated any more with the person they are named after. So 'Shakespearean' means 'associated with or like Shakespeare'. It has no meaning apart from the association with ...


28

It seems that the current consensus is “don’t change” (-ys). Swan 2005 cautiously says that "proper nouns usually [emphasis mine - Alex B.] have ys". the Kennedys (not the Kennedies) There’s a punk band, Dead Kennedys http://www.deadkennedys.com/; there’s also aTV show, The Kennedys. the Willoughbys the Wolfs (not the Wolves) the Henrys the two ...


27

The de Havilland Moth was a line of airplanes manufactured in the 1920's and 1930's. Since they are talking about airplanes, and the book was published in 1932, that may be the answer. According to Wikipedia: Every light aircraft flying in the UK was commonly referred to as a 'Moth', regardless if it was de Havilland-built or not.


25

I would say that strictly speaking it is not. Irregular plurals carry if they are instances of the base word. A "fireman" is a type of man, so "firemen" is the appropriate plural, but the "Toronto Maple Leafs" are not leaves. Since Batman is a proper noun, Batman does not designate a type of man but the name for one particular man, so the irregular plural ...


22

The indeterminate a here implies that the speaker - and probably the listener as well - do not actually know Mr. Alan Lloyd and Mrs. Millie Preston. They're just names on the will, not actual people they are familiar with. The use of the a here means that this person could be any Alan Lloyd out there, since there isn't a concrete person to refer to. This is ...


22

When it is their name, Mom and Dad would be capitalised: Dear Mom and Dad, I am just writing to let you know, that although everyone has a mom and a >dad, you are my special mom and dad. So, Mom, I just want to say ‘brava!’; and Dad, ‘bravo!’. I’ve just been telling Sis, that Mom’s new coat is so cool. XX Here's the commentary from an exercise ...


21

People do say it, but that doesn't make it right or that you should repeat it. People will probably understand what you mean, but it sounds wrong to me. Ask instead: "Do you have a Facebook account?" "Are you on Facebook?" "Do you use Facebook?" And note Facebook should be capitalised. Finally, the website Facebook was named after the face book or ...


20

For Sun, you always need the definite article when referring to the star itself. The only time you don't need it is when you're referring to the Sun's light/heat output... "I like sun" is just about valid, but sun there just functions as shorthand for sunshine. Certainly that's what it means in the more common form "I like the sun" (note lack of ...


20

I would not capitalize "apartheid". None of the dictionaries I have checked capitalize it as a headword (MW, AHD, Collins, Oxford). Capitalization, like punctuation, is one of the less settled areas of English orthography. I somewhat doubt that there is any definite answer about whether it is "correct" or "incorrect" to capitalize this word, so I won't ...


19

The official rule is: if it acts as a singular unit, it gets a singular congugation; if it acts as a group of individuals viewed individually, it gets a plural congugation. There is no difference between common and proper nouns. For example, Seventy dollars is too much to spend on a DVD. (The seventy dollars is one unit) In relation to the example above, ...


18

In order to pluralize a name, this guide says: There are really just two rules to remember, whether you’re pluralizing a given (first) name or a surname (last name): If the name ends in s, sh, ch, x or z, add es. In every other case, add s. Similarly, there are two fundamental no-no’s: Never change a y to ies when pluralizing a name;...


18

Various style manuals and guides (MLA, Chicago, Guardian, Grammar Girl) tend to concur: The four seasons are lowercased. Except when part of a formal name, such as the name of an event (Winter Olympics), school term (Spring Quarter 2012), or issue of a journal (Summer 2008). Except when the season is personified, as in poetry ("Then Spring--with her warm ...


18

Edit: This first bit was after my not grokking the question. I'm leaving it anyway. Proper answer follows Christen does not mean "to make Christian", it means "to anoint with oil", which is part of the Christian naming rite. (Christ is from the same root, meaning "anointed one"). Sain is sometimes used of people being named in religious rites without it ...


17

Here's a list including those in Jon's answer: Christianity Judas Greek Amuse Aphrodisiac: Arousing or intensifying sexual desire (from the goddess, Aphrodite) Apollonian: Clear, harmonious, and restrained. (from the god, Apollo) Dionysian: wild, irrational, and undisciplined (from the god, Dionysus) Echo: a reflected sound heard again from its ...


16

<H> is a letter that's used in English largely to modify other letters, like <TH>, used for both /ð/ and /θ/, <SH> for /ʃ/, and <CH> for /tʃ/. This is for native English words that may have been borrowed centuries ago, but now are felt to be English. In proper names from other languages, like Afghanistan, Baghdad, and Lamborghini, we are not ...


15

Are you worried about offending atheists/polytheists by being too monotheistic, or about offending monotheists by being blasphemous? In any case, I think that in most contexts, anyone offended by “thank God” would still be offended by “thank god”, and vice versa. In informal contexts, I’d be surprised if either offended anyone; extremely devout monotheists ...


15

Whether there is a plural form depends entirely on whether there is actually a singular form. In the case of WordPress, there isn't a singular form. You don't say “I implemented my blog as a WordPress.” It’s using WordPress or even on WordPress or in WordPress, but not as a WordPress. Consequently there is no plural form. This doesn't apply to all ...


15

In English the word most matching your usage is Dinosaur a fossil reptile of the Mesozoic era, often reaching an enormous size. a person or thing that is outdated or has become obsolete because of failure to adapt to changing circumstances. For example I love my dinosaur phone The real reason I haven’t upgraded my phone – even though it ...


14

Communism is a common noun and, as such, neither it, nor any adjective derived from it, normally needs to begin with a capital letter. If, however, the adjective is part of a title, as in The Communist Party of Trashkanistan or The People's Communist Republic of Transculpania, or if the noun appears in a slogan such as Workers of the World Fight for the ...


14

I'd call this a jetty myself. Pier isn't wrong, but tends to imply a more magnificent structure than that shown.


14

Stylistically, the phrase "to hear a King proclaim..." echoes the previous construction "to hear a preacher say...." The repetition of the indefinite article maintains the flow of the speech. (Imagine how awkward it would have sounded if, in place of "to hear a King proclaim," Obama had said "to hear the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. proclaim....") Of ...


14

No, you should not. Even Sir Tim Berners-Lee does not: 1991 T. Berners-Lee WorldWideWeb: Summary in comp.archives (Usenet newsgroup) 9 Aug., The WWW world consists of documents, and links... The web contains documents in many formats. OED does say "usually with initial capital", and then goes on to say Originally written with a capital initial, ...


14

We should capitalize these words if they are being used as the name of the person. You can capitalize these when referring to your own relatives: Hello, Mother. When you use mom/dad in general meaning father/mother, it's a common noun. So do not capitalize them when they follow possessive pronouns such as her, his, my, our, your. (my mother ~ my mom ) A ...


14

The Wizard of (the land of) Oz, actual name Oscar Zoroaster Phadrig Isaac Norman Henkle Emmannuel Ambroise Diggs (shortened to OZ exc. pinhead ) hailed according to the story from America not Australia. Baum is reported as saying that the name "OZ" came from his file cabinet labeled "O–Z".[1] Strictly speaking since Baum did not originally intend for The ...


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