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1 vote

How to force myself to pronounce a word correctly?

Breaking a long-standing habit, especially one related to language pronunciation, can be challenging but definitely achievable. Here are some techniques that might help you adjust to the correct ...
Dennisleon's user avatar
1 vote

Why is J often used to represent a "Y" sound in Romanizations of other writing systems?

I am not referring to IPA. I am referring to examples in textbooks. For example, my Ukrainian textbook says that the letter Я is pronounced as "ja". This is a case where English speakers are ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42.3k
0 votes

Is there a rule for how to pronounce words such as "dance", "prance", "castle"?

In official standard British English, and indeed most varieties of British English, the 'A' in words like "dance", " can't " and "bath" are pronounced the same as the 'a' ...
Costillo's user avatar
1 vote

Why is J often used to represent a "Y" sound in Romanizations of other writing systems?

Why is J often used to represent a "Y" sound in Romanizations of other writing systems? I am referring to examples in textbooks. For example, my Ukrainian textbook says that the letter Я is ...
Bob Dietz's user avatar
-2 votes

How does one correctly pronounce the letter 'H': "Aych" or "haych"?

I would say "haych". Like a commenter says, that's what I've grown up around people saying. My grandad was called Harold, but many of his friends called him Haych. With that said, it's ...
Danny Beckett's user avatar
1 vote

How to pronounce the "bunched /r/" sound?

I know this is an old question, but for the sake of any future readers, I thought there might be something that could be added: I might suggest taking it in 3 steps: A very important aspect of the ...
Timothy Bruce's user avatar
0 votes

Why is Indian English usually rhotic?

Might be due to influence from the other languages native to India, especially the Indo-Aryan and Dravidian ones. Just as Canadian English sounds much like American English because of the geographical ...
Costillo's user avatar
1 vote

Why is Indian English usually rhotic?

That's a tough one. The national accents of the British Commonwealth tend to be non-rhotic, the largest exceptions being India and Canada. For Canada, it's probably because of the country's proximity (...
Costillo's user avatar
-2 votes

UK English pronunciation of word "language" please?

In British English, "language" is often pronounced with a soft "g," like "lan-gwidge." However, accents and regional differences can lead to variations. In Australian ...
Elizabeth Williams's user avatar
0 votes

"to bath" vs "to bathe"

I wonder if the confusion here stems from Italian being a much more phonetically regular language than English, and thus the /th/ grapheme is distinctly different in "bath" vs. "bathe.&...
Ari's user avatar
  • 305
0 votes

What exactly is the "schwa" sound?

The 'schwa' is essentially the most unstressed vowel sound, that can appear with any vowel. Examples of schwa include the 'e' in words like "garden" and "glasses" (though in the ...
Costillo's user avatar
-1 votes

"autistic" vs "artistic" in RP

In general, the British English vowel quality is different between "au\aw' and 'ar', the British tend to round the 'au\aw' sound to make it sound almost exactly like the 'or' sound that's common ...
Costillo's user avatar
2 votes

Correct Choice of First Vowel in Words Such as "Regret" and "Return"

The 'E' in words like "return" and the first 'E' of "regret" sound more frequently than not, like the 'i' in "kit" or a schwa. But doubtlessly, there has to be a few ...
Costillo's user avatar
4 votes

Correct Choice of First Vowel in Words Such as "Regret" and "Return"

No, you can't pronounce these vowels as /ɛ/.That would sound completely alien to a native speaker. /i/ is the normal British pronunciation; in American English, /ə/ is also frequently heard in regret ...
TonyK's user avatar
  • 3,539
4 votes

Correct Choice of First Vowel in Words Such as "Regret" and "Return"

Lexical sets (e.g.: FLEECE, DRESS, KIT ...) might be provided ... but that only works for stressed vowels, and those are not stressed vowels, which means they're reduced, which means everyone will say ...
0 votes

Flapping in British English

The conversion of 't' into 'd' in certain contexts and positions in a word is one of the hallmarks of North American English, though it isn't exclusive to North America, as t-flapping can also be ...
Costillo's user avatar
0 votes

Why does "contrary" have two different pronunciations?

In general, the difference in the two pronunciations of "contrary" boils down to whether the 'A' is pronounced like that in "rarity" or as a schwa. British English favours the ...
Costillo's user avatar
2 votes

Has British English always had two alternative pronunciations of "been"?

The pronunciation of "been" as the same as "bean" isn't exclusive to British English. It can also be found in Australian English, Canadian English, South African English, and in ...
Costillo's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

"Democrat Party" = deliberate needling or natural colloqial speech?

No. The genesis of "Democrat Party" is the speeches of various right-wing Republicans. Of course, it isn't grammatically correct, and it isn't about relaxed speech, since no one ever talks ...
Andrew Lazarus's user avatar
6 votes

Has British English always had two alternative pronunciations of "been"?

Yes always, ever since Early Modern English The answer is yes, British English has “always” (since Early Modern English) had a shortened vowel in the weak form of been. This is therefore nothing new. ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
0 votes

I pronounce question as kweshtin. Is my pronunciation wrong?

The late Prof. Lawler commented: /'kwɛʃtən/ (which is what I take "kweshtin" to mean) is well within the range of possibilities in American English. Also common are /'kwɛʃtʃən/, /'kwɛstʃən/,...
1 vote

I pronounce question as kweshtin. Is my pronunciation wrong?

I am from the Ohio River valley. Southern Indiana. I pronounce it as questshun. We have what's referred to as a country, hillbilly, or redneck accent. My mother in law was from the Northern Illinois ...
Ashley S's user avatar

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