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2

I would go with "Ay, ay, ay" as the spelling, because it comes directly from Spanish. https://dle.rae.es/ay interj. U. para expresar muchos y muy diversos movimientos del ánimo, y más ordinariamente aflicción o dolor.


0

This is speculation; I don't have any solid evidence for it (except for the first sentence below). The word Reich was fairly rare in the English language before the 1930s (See Google Ngrams). During World War II, I suspect people made no effort to pronounce German words correctly — possibly anybody who tried to pronounce it correctly would have been open to ...


1

Interesting Q! I've used 'the FAQ' for decades. I've always pronounced it out by the letters. "The F A Q", rarely by the words. The Frequently Asked Questions are sometimes useful, often not. Occasionally, "Just read the FAQ" is indeed a way of telling someone that they haven't done their due diligence, especially in tech, similar to RTFM. "Read The Fine ...


1

So that comb looks just like its brethren: bomb, dumb, jamb, lamb, thumb, tomb, womb. This tells you something about all those common words’ shared history. It tells you nothing at all about their current pronunciation. But that’s fine, because it is not intended to do so. Their spelling is not intended to inform you of their pronunciation, which is ...


2

In American English we would pronounce "it is on" as /ɪɾɪzɑːn/ or /ɪdɪzɑːn/, and "it's on" as /ɪtsɑːn/ or /ɪdzɑːn/. /tz/ is not present in any dialect of American English, and if you think you're hearing it, you're almost certainly actually hearing /dz/, /ts/, or /t z/; in the latter case, the /t/ comes at the end of a word and /z/ at the beginning of ...


5

The term "long vowel" doesn't refer very clearly to a particular set of vowels in English. However, whatever is meant by it, I'm fairly sure that it is true that long vowels can get reduced to schwa in fully unstressed syllables. Not all unstressed syllables permit vowel reduction First, I'd like to make a few clarifications about the statement "any vowel ...


3

Diverge Pronunciation: /dəˈvərdʒ/, /daɪˈvərdʒ/. You won't find vowels in stressed syllables reduced to schwas, but there are lots of English words with long vowels in unstressed syllables.


0

Bèt-táh it is as simple as better but with an 'a' at the end instead of 'er' at the end.


0

I'm fifty years old and live in Cambridge, 50 miles north of London, a hotbed of RP-speaking. But someone with a good ear can still tell that I was originally from Yorkshire (most people can't apparently). I go for: water /ˈwɔːtə/ ( /ˈwɑːtər/ sounds very odd, not even American) either /ˈaɪðə/ ( /ˈiːðər/ sounds very American ) herb ...


1

I would recommend pronouncing this word with at least four syllables. When you talk in your question about a pronunciation with three syllables, you seem to be referring to an audio file linked from the Free Dictionary entry. I have never seen a written transcription of the pronunciation of certiorari that showed it as having three syllables. I prefer to ...


0

Interesting example. The Oxford English Dictionary says: Pronunciation: Brit. /ʊh/, /ʊx/, /ʌh/, /ʌx/, /əː/, /əh/, /əːh/, /ə/, U.S. /ʊh/, /ʊx/, /əh/, /əx/, /ə/ The New Oxford American Dictionary says /əg/


1

"ew" as in few or pew...expression of disgust...I'm from British Columbia, Canada and have never heard it pronounced any other way. Example: "Ugh, that outhouse smells disgusting."


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The word is in origin Greek, not in use in English before the 18th century, although Philemon Holland’s translation of Pliny, of 1601, rather charmingly mentions that there is ‘a certain skinny gum, in Greek called Lichen, which hath a wonderfull operation to cure the rhagadies or chaps’. But in Benjamin Smart’s Grammar of English Pronunciation (1810), the "...


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