136 votes
Accepted

What is the antonym of "assemble a team"?

MorganFR wrote in a comment: "you're probably looking for disband or one of its synonyms." Disband — M-W transitive verb: to break up the organization of : dissolve intransitive verb: to ...
65 votes
Accepted

Why is the apostrophe positioned differently in "ones' complement" than "two's complement"?

Donald Knuth, that doyen of computer science, says in Art of Computer Programming, Vol 2.: Detail-oriented readers and copy-editors should notice the position of the apostrophe in terms like "two'...
user2474226's user avatar
62 votes

Is the use of the term "bugged" to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

Before there were software bugs and software programs that needed to be de-bugged, the term existed and applied to defects or flaws in circuits, machines or operations. From the Index to Radio for ...
DavePhD's user avatar
  • 10.6k
56 votes
Accepted

Neutral term for "broken" in software

Known issue. As an example of fairly standard usage in the software and technology sectors, a program or system will be described as having a number of known issues. These will typically by ...
MikeRoger's user avatar
  • 3,771
47 votes

What is the antonym of "assemble a team"?

dissolve. See https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dissolve Typical uses are to: dissolve parliament, dissolve a partnership, dissolve a marriage. "break up" is given as its synonym. Part of ...
Paul Chernoch's user avatar
43 votes
Accepted

Is there a term for "likes" and "dislikes" on a social network?

Given that upvotes is roughly synonymous with likes, and downvotes is roughly synonymous with dislikes, I might just call the general class votes.
DyingIsFun's user avatar
  • 17.9k
38 votes

Is the use of the term "bugged" to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

I would agree with the other answers. "bugged" is incorrect usage. The standard American programming terminology is that the "software is buggy" or "has bugs" and this has been true since I began ...
Emma Dash's user avatar
  • 1,962
37 votes

Is there a term for "likes" and "dislikes" on a social network?

Generally speaking reactions would apply here and is used on the messaging platform Slack. Whether it's a like, a dislike, a thumbs up, a heart or a pizza emoji, the users are reacting to the post, ...
SuperBiasedMan's user avatar
29 votes

Is the use of the term "bugged" to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

I have mostly seen it from non-native speakers, or children (approximately under 14) on the forums of Blizzard games and Plex. I agree with all other posters that buggy is the correct adjective. There ...
Nicholas Shanks's user avatar
28 votes

What is the antonym of "assemble a team"?

Break up 1.1 (of a gathering or collective) disband In your context, you might say After Tim left, management decided to break up the team Also consider 'split': After Tim left, management ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 1,797
27 votes

Is the use of the term "bugged" to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

The prevalent usage is "the function has a bug" or "the function is buggy". There is a very subtle, but important difference that is highlighted when you look at the word debugging. Debugging is the ...
Polygnome's user avatar
  • 538
26 votes

Is there a hypernym for “public” and “private”?

As a native English (UK) speaker I’d understand what you meant if you said something like privacy level or level of privacy, but since your question originated from a technical perspective, the C# (c-...
mclayton's user avatar
  • 966
23 votes
Accepted

Category term for “global” and “local”

In programming, scope is the term used to describe the parts of the program where a binding of a name to an entity - e.g. a variable - is valid.
michael.hor257k's user avatar
20 votes

Neutral term for "broken" in software

I'd describe that software as buggy. As a software developer, we often encounter buggy code/software/etc. It usually works just fine except for a few use cases. In my experience this is common ...
Mordred's user avatar
  • 679
17 votes

Is there a hypernym for “public” and “private”?

In normal usage the degree to which something is either public or private is called "privacy". That's the term used by websites to describe the settings that control who can see or modify ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 25.5k
16 votes

Is the use of the term "bugged" to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

While I agree with others that 'buggy' is far more common usage, I do hear the term 'bugged' used to describe code from time to time. Additionally, it is usually from professional software engineers ...
reirab's user avatar
  • 1,275
16 votes

Neutral term for "broken" in software

Sub-optimal may be appropriate, if you want to emphasize that everything works, just not quite the way you want it to: below the highest level or standard, or not done in the best way possible ...
Hellion's user avatar
  • 59.4k
13 votes

Neutral term for "broken" in software

A glitch is a typically minor failure in an otherwise healthy system. A glitchy system is one that exhibits glitches. Normally it suggests a system that has numerous glitches, but it can also describe ...
talrnu's user avatar
  • 5,234
12 votes

Is the use of the term "bugged" to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

At the moment, this seems like a common mistake rather than a new usage. I think it's a logical guess to use 'bugged' that way' like using 'breaked' instead of 'broken.' However, when native ...
Steve Cooper's user avatar
10 votes

Is the use of the term "bugged" to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

I often hear bugged used to mean that something is in a non functional state. It's more often used to describe that something is currently broken, either completely or partially. Typically I hear it ...
kicken's user avatar
  • 321
10 votes

Neutral term for "broken" in software

What to call it "Broken" is fine for when the spec says "this is how it should work", and it doesn't work that way. This is called an "un-met specification". "Broken" also is ideal for something ...
Beanluc's user avatar
  • 478
10 votes
Accepted

Pre(-)processing/post(-)processing hyphen presence in research publications written in UK/US English

Both the hyphenated and non-hyphenated versions are acceptable in both British and American English. A quick NGrams query shows that the spelling "preprocessing" is prevalent over "pre-proceesing" on ...
Armen Ծիրունյան's user avatar
9 votes

What is the antonym of "assemble a team"?

In the peculiar project management parlance the stages of team development are: The five stages: Stage 1: Forming Stage 2: Storming Stage 3: Norming Stage 4: Performing ...
Spehro Pefhany's user avatar
9 votes

What is the slang English word for not structured programming code?

Spaghetti code ? Spaghetti code is a pejorative phrase for source code that has a complex and tangled control structure, especially one using many GOTO statements, exceptions, threads, or other "...
GEdgar's user avatar
  • 25.1k
9 votes

Is "repository" pronounced /rɪˈpɒzɪt(ə)ri/ or \ri-ˈpä-zə-ˌtȯr-ē\ or /rəˈpäzəˌtôrē/?

I'm not not sure if it's an American/British thing It is an American/British thing, although there also could be variation between individuals of either accent. In general, British English ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 81.6k
9 votes
Accepted

What is the name for a hardware equivalent of a Widget?

It's still a widget. Widget was a general term for a small piece of hardware long before software existed. The term was just incorporated into software terminology. The same thing thing applies to &...
BoldBen's user avatar
  • 17.2k
8 votes

Why exactly is the verb "to throw" used when an error occurs in the program?

The concept of exceptions originated in the programming language Lisp. Originally, a part of a program might cause an error to occur. You could specify a way for the program to continue executing on ...
Gilles 'SO- stop being evil''s user avatar
8 votes

Is the use of the term "bugged" to refer to software bugs in English a worldwide or regional use?

The following Ngram confirms the many answers that "buggy" is the conventional term in the context of software, whereas "software is bugged" and "code is bugged" doesn't ...
Lawrence's user avatar
  • 38.5k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible