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41

Whateverize is always a word Yes, of course versionize is a “real word” — and no disparaging remarks about its parentage should be made in polite company. This is because ‑ize is a productive suffix in English that’s used to produce a new verb from various nouns and adjectives. That means that any word derived by combining an existing one of those using ‑...


23

Some prescriptive grammarians would argue that the de- prefix should be used on verbs and un- should be used on adjectives. So, you deregister something and it becomes unregistered, or you deselect something and it is now unselected. The logic behind this is probably because de- only attaches to verbs to give the notion of reversal, so for the sake of ...


23

Here's a couple of IT specific terms. In the context of IT premature optimisation is a common term, with the phrase 'premature optimisation is the root of all evil' coined. While this explicitly refers to program optimisation, it can also make sense in other IT contexts. For example, if you're talking the ideal arrangement of buttons when mocking up a ...


21

Well I normally hear - "You are doing that bass-ackwards!" Which is just a nice way to say ass backwards, or doing something in the wrong order. Ass backwards. The state doing (or having done) something the wrong way. A nicer way to say it, "You are jumping the gun there." To start something prematurely. to do something before it should be ...


15

Normally un- with a verb means to reverse—“undo”—the previously-taken action of the verb. You “unscrew” a jar lid someone previously screwed on; you “unwrap” a package someone previously wrapped. You can even use un- with verbs signifying actions normally regarded as irreversible—create or kill, for instance—as long as you are speaking or ...


13

The short answer: yes, it is productive, because you can create words using this suffix that have never been heard before, such as the two-trillion-and-sixteenth coin in Scrooge McDuck's Money Bin. From Wikipedia: A productive grammatical process defines an open class, one which admits new words or forms. Non-productive grammatical processes may be seen ...


9

The phrase "getting ahead of yourself" also comes to mind.


6

Very broadly, de- is more likely to indicate action, whereas un- is more likely to connote a passive status: After you detune your guitar, it is an untuned guitar. In practice, of course, there are so many exceptions and counterexamples as to render this "rule" largely meaningless. I would guess, though, that people are somewhat more likely to follow this ...


5

This looks like what you're asking about. As you can see, it's a topic of great interest to linguists, and Larry Horn is pretty much the expert on negation. To quote the abstract: Since Whorf (1936), many linguists have tried their hand at corralling the restrictions on the formation of "reversative" un-verbs; cf. e.g. Marchand (1969), Dowty (1979), ...


4

The morpheme -less seems to be only attachable to most nouns. Try it with adjectives and it doesn't work: happyless is one and it sounds very wrong.


4

Nominalisation is a noun phrase generated from another word class, usually a verb. Here's the Cambridge Dictionaries Online definition, which also specifically mentions that the process can be used to form noun phrases (as opposed to the simplest case, which simply involves using a verb as a noun - for example a big spend). OP's examples also feature... ...


4

Among verbs, I believe that un- is used to intrinsically undo something (eg, uncreating an object) whereas de- means to reverse its effects (eg, decompiling a program), without modifying the original item. Examples One might want to unsay something—to take back the fact that it was said in the first place. People become desensitized to things—...


3

-ment is not a free suffix you can add as you like. The nouns ending in -ment are either Latin or French. And the etymology of -ment is not clear. Even the meaning of -men and -mentum is difficult to analysize. If you study the Latin nouns in -men/mentum you find that the nouns are of various types and it is not possible to give a simple idea of the ...


2

Let's see here. Your first question is why you would choose "-ize" as the N->V suffix for "acronym". Wikipedia lists five V producing suffixes (http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:English_verb-forming_suffixes): -en (Hard -> Harden) so Adj->V -fy (Can't think of a single example) -ify (Beauty -> Beautify) so N->V -ise (Alternative of -ize) -ize (Custom ->...


2

Sure, "versionize" is utterly common in computing-marketing. (Self-evidently, it just means, to convert a fairly undynamic, unsupported product (perhaps an app), to one that has supported regularly ongoing versions. It's just like "monetise." Another similar trendy term today is "gamification" (or perhaps gamization). Questions about "real words" are ...


2

This word appears to be jargon (ie technical terminology) in the computer programming and administration fields. wordnik.com provides "To make a version of; translate." which it attributes to The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia. This 2012 blog is entitled "How Do You Versionize Your Code?" which uses versionize in context of keeping different versions of ...


2

A Google Books search yields two matches for mismodify. The earlier of these is from Mervyn Falk, A Cleft Palate Team Addresses the Speech Clinician (1971) [combined snippets]: Keep in mind that we have defined the production of a speech signal as a modified voiced or voiceless airstream. Now what is done to overmodify or mismodify, as you might conceive ...


1

Since some time has passed without an answer, I thought I'd try with a partial one. I don't know of any examples of ablaut reduplications in English where the first vowel is the backer/opener one. You asked about a "process", but I think it's difficult to analyze because reduplication is not extremely productive in English. The words that show this pattern ...


1

Yes, mismodified means exactly what you imagine it to mean. That’s how English affixes like this work: you combine a common prefix and a common base word to create a word that everyone who knows those two components already knows what means. It is much easier to prove that something does exist than that it does not, for the affirmative a simple existence ...


1

The phrase doing the rounds here among the programming team is "squash first, shine later". The word "bugs" (after "squash") got lost somewhere. I like it, but I'm fairly certain it is a very local thing. Never heard it anywhere else.


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