9

The present continuous used for the future implies planning and arrangement: There is a suggestion that more than one person is aware of the event, and that some preparation has already happened. e.g. edufind.com I'm meeting Joe at the station > implies > Joe and I have arranged it. I am arriving tomorrow. > implies > I have my ticket. We're ...


9

English can use both the present progressive construction, as in your first sentence, and going to, as in your second sentence, to express the future. Both describe a future event, arrangement or intention. However, going to suggests a little more strongly than the present progressive that the event is fixed and cannot be changed. The choice between the two ...


7

I disagree. I see it as the same of the use of the simple present for the future ("I leave next week" is also valid). "I'm leaving next week" in no way implies that "I'm leaving today" in some sense; in fact, it has the opposite implication. To me, what it seems is that the use of phrase specifying the time, such as "next week," establishes the reference ...


6

Verbs of state such as to know, to like, to own, to understand, to mean are not usually used in progressive (aka continuous) tenses. In the sentence you've mentioned, you have used the Present Progressive, but because to know is a verb of state (expresses a state, not an action), you should use the Simple form of that tense, which is the Present Simple. It ...


5

"I have forgotten" is absolutely grammatical and normal. But you need "a sandwich" (or "the sandwich" if you are talking about a specific sandwich known to you and your hearer).


5

This house has been being built for years is horribly clumsy and inelegant. If I google the expression "has been being built", at my time/space coordinates it currently achieves 24,400 hits. That figure seems to place this particular "has been being [X]" construction towards the upper end of the prevalence scale: if I substitute almost any other common ...


4

If all of the precise time-keeping (start to finish) was in the past, regardless of whether for 40 days or 40 years, then kept conveys the proper tense. If the comment is about it keeping precise time from some point in the past continuing until the present time, then has kept would be correct.


4

He uses my car for one hour every day. This indicates the normal state of affairs. There is no indication that the situation is likely to end. It may have been going on for years. He has been using my car for one hour every day. This indicates a temporary state of affairs. We assume that there will be a definite finish. We also get the sense that this ...


4

To know is a verb of mental state. It doesn't usually take the progressive form. This source has a section entitled "Verbs that are not usually used in the continuous form" that you can look at. That said, verbs denoting mental states can be used in the Present Progressive, if you want to express an idea of irritation. Consider: "Susie's always ...


3

"I quote" is correct because it also maintains parallelism with "to conclude". if it were "concluding the review" then "I am quoting" would be appropriate. informally, both are okay.


3

Your example is an excellent one, because it absolutely can be written validly and indeed well in either the simple present or the present progressive. As some services hold instances of the view, … Perfectly good example of the simple present. It is normal, in the sort of cases we are talking about that the thing we are talking about happen, so simple ...


3

I will expand on my earlier comment: The question appears to require some extrapolation and inference that if the clock was built in 1753 and its accuracy was measured for the text to be accurate for 40 years then we have only accounted to the year 1793. 1753 to 2014 would be 261 years that are not tracked and we can presume the clock has not remained ...


3

The first "I'm attending a meeting tomorrow" gives the listener/reader almost 100% certainty that you will attend. The second one "I am going to attend a meeting tomorrow" gives the reader/listener the idea that you have the intention. You plan on it, but something could come up.


3

He must have already gone to sleep/bed He must [already] be sleeping He must be asleep already Any of the above can express the idea of a person who is either in bed or sleeping at the moment of speaking. The modal verb must is used for speculating, and making deductions. It expresses the speaker's conviction or certainty. In other words there ...


3

It is present tense. If you noticed at sometime in the past you would say When I arrived at his house I saw that he had a new car. The only thing is that see when used in this sense is something that has relevance to a moment (in the recent past) which has now gone - the moment when you 'saw'. But because it is relevant to the present time (his having a new ...


3

I think that some verbs can be followed by another verb which takes the ING ending. Here's an example that I found on the internet: He's always texting me and he keeps calling a lot like 24/7. He says that he loves me and he only wants to be by my side. Why do I have this feeling that he's using me only and that he's a player? It seems that the ...


3

If you wake up early and see the event of 'the rising of the sun', you would almost always say Look! The sun is rising. Or other expressions such as one of the following: Look at the sunrise! Look, the sun is coming up! This is because the present participle is the tense most often used to refer to what someone or something is doing at the ...


3

The Cambridge Dictionary page you refer to does not talk about rapid decisions. It says: We use will for immediate intentions and decisions. In other words we use will when asked to make a decision about something to which we have, at that moment, given no prior thought. For example, if your friend notes: "It's getting dark in here," you could ...


3

Well, we use the Present Continuous to talk about something in the future that we have agreed to do: Tim and I are going to the theatre tonight, then we're having dinner at White's. Are you doing anything at the weekend? - I'm playing tennis with Mary on Saturday. So, I'd say it's OK to use the Present Continuous in your sentence about watching TV ...


2

It's worth noting to begin with, that in a way English has no future tense.* Its verbs don't have future tense as do those of many other languages, and so all our ways of talking about the future are with combinations of verbs that are either infinitive or in other tenses. Will/Shall Future The form you say you learnt in school uses a modal (will or shall)...


2

The expression “look forward to,” if what you are looking forward to is to be expressed in a verb, requires the gerund, an -ing form of that verb, to be the object of the preposition to—in this case helping. Since that -ing form is necessary, it might be better not to use an -ing form of the verb look as well: that is, use “We look ...


2

Based on English grammar, after looking forward to, you're supposed to use the verb with -ing, so all the items from that list will be crossed off except #2 and #5; that are both the same as far as I can see. So that's how you should have all those phrases in one sentence. Regarding your question about using are, the answer is yes! If the verb comes in -ing ...


2

Is it correct to use the present progressive or not? In general storytelling can be written in any tense as long as it is consistent and makes sense. The same is true for dialogues, except that the tense of the quoted parts is basically impervious to the tense of the story telling. For example, a storyteller using past tense verbs: “How long does it take ...


2

Consider: "I always eat bread." and "I'm always eating bread." The first connotes that there is a preference for choosing bread while the latter connotes bread is being consumed continuously, if not nonstop, even in the present. To return to your question, "I'm always going by bike" connotes continuous travel using this mode of transport (with a hint of ...


2

OP's teacher is completely mistaken in supposing the exclamation mark affects choice of tense. Except in an extremely contrived context, only Simple Present he makes rude comments is idiomatic for OP's specific example, but consider this closely related example... 1: You drink whisky every time I see you. 2: You are drinking whisky every time I see ...


2

Senses, emotional and mental states, desires, opinions, and measurements are not usually perceived by native English speakers as processes and thus aren't usually couched in the continuous/progressive form. *I am forgetting his name. *I am preferring chocolate to vanilla. *This pizza is costing too much. These examples are highly non-idiomatic ...


2

You use the progressive when you think about the situation as having a beginning and an end. For example, one person might say, "I live in Toronto" because they don't think about ever leaving Toronto. Another person, pehaps an international student studying at the U of T might say "I'm living in Toronto" because the person intends to leave after graduating. ...


2

The use of present perfect tense of your first emboldened sentence is fine. Each time she sees her sibling something has already happened - they have grown 6 inches during the time since he last saw them. Every time I see them, they've grown six inches. (I hope this is not literal though otherwise she only needs to see her siblings about 9 times for them ...


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