50

Given that this has appeared around Easter (albeit a couple of days early in my calendar), I'm going to answer on the basis of the phrase Christ is risen! He is risen indeed, alleluia! which is used in some traditions. There are two ways of looking at this. It's an archaic use of English which conjugates verbs of motion with be in present perfect, in ...


40

Affirming Andrew Leach's answer, the Paschal Greeting can be classified as a set phrase in many languages--especially those influenced by Orthodox Christianity. He is risen is perceived in modern English as a predicate adjective, but it is technically an archaic present perfect construction from Matthew 28:6: He is not here: for he is risen, as he said....


39

The Present Perfect Construction in English has the following uses (cf. McCawley 1971): (a) The Universal sense of the Perfect, used to indicate that a state of affairs prevailed throughout some interval stretching from the past into the present • I've known Max since 1960. (b) The Existential sense of the Perfect, used to indicate the existence of past ...


37

This is a difficult area of English for foreign learners, and I’m afraid you’re not going to understand it fully from a few answers here. Very briefly, you use the present perfect continuous form to talk about events in the recent past, particularly activities that have not been completed. The form is often found with the prepositions ‘for’ and ‘since’, as ...


34

1 means that the action happened just now. You would typically see it in your e-mail program just after you send an e-mail. Your program might give you this message to let you know that the message you just sent has indeed been sent. 2 refers to something that happened at some time in the past. It could have been an hour ago, a day ago, or even a century ...


21

The difference between your two examples isn’t great, but, depending on context, A might give a slightly stronger impression than B that the speaker will continue to live there. The difference is more apparent in a pair such as: I’ve been reading your book. I’ve read your book. The first suggests that the speaker is still reading it, whereas the ...


19

"Was" is the correct word to use. Why? If we were to rearrange the sentence a little, we would see why: The USA has been a British colony for many years The USA was a British colony for many years. Example 1 indicates that the USA is still a British colony, and has been a British colony for many years. Example 2 indicates that USA ...


19

Think of the past tense as referring to an event that took place at a particular time in the past. In saying The message was sent, the speaker will normally have in mind something like yesterday or last week. The present perfect is called 'present' for a reason. The speaker is talking about the situation now, a situation in which a past event has some ...


18

You should normally use be gone if no direction is specified, have gone with directions: Where is Cleopatra? She is gone. (= she is away, or dead) Where is Cleopatra? She has gone to the temple. This is idiom: it is irregular and only applies to very few verbs. And is gone can still be used with specific directions sometimes, though it is probably ...


17

Die is an Inchoative verb; that means it refers to a change of state. The Present Perfect construction can be used with a Stative predicate like be dead or own a house the way you suggest. This is called the Universal sense of the Perfect. But die is not stative; it's inchoative, and therefore punctual -- it refers only to the instant when the change took ...


16

... you can't present perfect (or continuous) and past simple within a sentence. As it stands, this rule is incorrect. In many cases it is acceptable and logical to mix past and present references in consecutive clauses I lost my keys last week, but now I have found them. This makes sense: A was true then, but B is true now. This, however, ...


12

"I have learned the English language in the past few weeks" implies that you have completed learning it. "I have been learning the English language" doesn't imply it. This isn't true in all cases. "I have been eating blueberries for the past few weeks" means nearly the same thing as "I have eaten blueberries for the past few weeks." On the other hand, "I ...


12

It wouldn't be wrong to say "Did you go to French Class today?", nor would it make you look stupid. Your friend is wrong though. There is nothing old-fashioned about using a perfect tense where a perfect tense is needed. In your example, it would depend on the circumstances. "Did you go to French class today?" is seeking information and nothing more. "Have ...


12

We can use 'could have' to talk about something somebody was capable of doing in PAST but didn't do. (Possible in Past) I could have gone to Oxford University but I preferred Harvard. She could have married him but she didn't want to. They could have bought a house here 20 years ago but chose not to. We can use 'could have been' to talk about possible ...


11

If I found a ball in the morning, I might say in the afternoon I found a ball today. The past tense locates an action at a specific time in the past, but today is a sufficiently prolonged period of time to allow the use of the past tense on the same day. I have found a ball today could occur, but only exceptionally, because the perfect construction is not ...


11

Whether or not an action is repeated has no bearing on the choice between the past tense and the present perfect construction. The first describes actions at a particular time in the past and the second relates past actions to the time of speaking. You wouldn’t say I have seen that movie twelve times on Tuesday because Tuesday is a particular time in the ...


11

It would work for describing an unsuccessful stand-up comic. "He has died for three years at the Edinburgh festival "


11

The main verb is are -- the Present Tense Third Person Plural form of be. This is another reduced relative clause, with Whiz-Deletion operating, this time on the be of the Passive, rather than the be of the Progressive, like the question this morning. The original sentence was something like There are several reasons which/that are/were proposed for the ...


11

Both are possible, grammatical, and idiomatic, but "my email ID has changed" simply means that the ID is no longer the same, while "my email ID has been changed" puts more stress on the fact that someone is responsible for actively changing the ID.


11

The ever in questions such as Have you ever flown a kite? can be understood as in your life to this present moment. The present perfect (have/has + past participle) is used because in your life is conceived of as unfinished time. It is the reason why the present perfect is used with other expressions that imply unfinished time: Have you seen Mary today? ...


11

Since 1973, the festival has been running every year. Since 1973, the festival has been run by the town's entertainment committee. Both fragments that you wrote are incomplete, but not incorrect, and they can be completed in different ways. In "has been run", "run" is a passive form: (Active) The town's entertainment committee runs the festival. (Passive) ...


10

The rule you quote is simplistic. It is quite permissible to mix all sorts of tenses within one sentence. The issue is whether the time relationships that they convey make sense. Take a simpler case: present and future. Would a blanket rule that you should never mix present and future in a sentence be valid? No. "Bob owns the house and so he will paint it ...


10

“Have you done it?” is the question to ask if you want to know: whether a task is finished, or whether they have experience with some task. For example, if you want to know whether a report is done, or whether somebody has gone sky diving before, you can ask, “Have you done it?” In the first case, you could also ask, “Have you done it yet?” In the latter, ...


10

"It will be the first time I have flown to America." - the flight will have finished at the point in time you're talking about: "It will be the first time [that] I [will] have flown to America". The first part of the clause indicates a future time, the subclause "i have flown to America" is in future perfect, indicating a completed future event. "It will be ...


10

It is correct Early Modern English meaning "He has risen". In older novels one can still find similar sentences, such as "He is come to see you, my Lord." Present perfect is a phenomenon that emerged in / has spread over many European languages. I believe initially the construction was restricted to certain verbs. In any case, it originally used either to ...


10

The phrase needed quotation marks It was "been there, done that" This is indeed said when someone claims an event or deed (e.g. landing on the moon) has already been performed been there done that an assertion that the speaker has personal experience or knowledge of a particular place or topic quotations A: Paragliding? B: Been there, done ...


9

Nothing wrong with Thursagen's answer, but he doesn't give an important (I believe) part of the explanation: The perfect (or present perfect) is used when the situation has some sort of present relevance. It is therefore not normally used of a situation which has ceased, and so would not be used in your example. It can however be used of a completed ...


9

In "I've been waiting for you for seven years" the focus is on the act of waiting. Maybe you want to emphasise how long seven years is, or make the listener understand how patient you have been. In "I've waited for you for seven years" the focus is on the result of the wait. Now, perhaps you want to emphasis that the wait is over, or you are unwilling to ...


9

when you say “I wrote my article yesterday,” does this imply that at this moment you have a finished article or not? Yes, you finished it. Otherwise, as you say, you would say something like "I started to write my article yesterday". In that case, 'started to write' has finished even if the article hasn't. What about present perfect? Does it imply ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible