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10 votes

Is "running" a gerund or a participial adjective?

In your examples, "enlightening" is best seen as an adjective and "running" as a VP comprising a gerund-participle form of the verb as head. Taking "running" first: it fails the usual tests for ...
BillJ's user avatar
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9 votes

Is "running" a gerund or a participial adjective?

tl;dr Despite running being in origin the -ING inflection of the verb to run, in your “a running experiment” example, it is no longer a verb and therefore ᴄᴀɴɴᴏᴛ be either a gerund or a participle ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 136k
8 votes

"Sending off a balloon": verb or noun?

This form of the verb is conventionally called a gerund. From the outside, a gerund works partly like a noun, because it can be the object of a verb, just like a normal noun: Agnes suggested sending ...
Cerberus - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
6 votes

The Guy Next Door Shoveling Snow Or The Guy Shoveling Snow?

Next door is properly placed. It modifies the guy, so it's part of the subject NP. If you move next door it becomes a modifier on something else. I was thankful for the guy shoveling snow next door ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Why did the present participle become more popular than a regular active verb?

John McWhorter writes that it "is almost certainly" due to the influence of Celtic languages spken alongside English (1): Given that Celtic languages were right there alongside English all the time,...
J. Siebeneichler's user avatar
5 votes

"What I'm doing is watching TV." — Why does it have to be the gerund-participle ('watching')?

I don't know the right way of analysing this, but it seems to me to have to do with grammatical aspect. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston and Pullum) interprets English as ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.4k
5 votes
Accepted

Why is “bales” the 3rd person singular of “bail”?

TL;DR: Bales is NOT a conjugation of bail; rather, bale is an alternate spelling of some definitions of bail. This was an error introduced by Google's definition-amalgamator. The correct conjugation ...
1006a's user avatar
  • 22.9k
5 votes
Accepted

the first trial <stemming/to stem> from... vs. the first person to climb

To summarize the question: We can say the first trial stemming from as well as the first trial to stem from. So why can't we say the first person climbing Mount Everest as well as the first ...
Shoe's user avatar
  • 33.2k
4 votes

"Ing form of see (Seeing)"

Somebody either advised you wrong, or you've misunderstood the advice that was given to you about stative verbs. The idea is that sentences like "I'm seeing a butterfly" usually sound odd to English ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.4k
4 votes

"I remember watching Dallas," vs. "I remember us watching Dallas."

I don't know the technical term for it but I call these noun phrases. The entire phrase functions as a noun. Watching is not an adjective or adverb, it's always a verb. But it makes up part of a ...
tjp's user avatar
  • 214
4 votes

Is "running" a gerund or a participial adjective?

Short answer I think “running” in “a running experiment” is the same part of speech as “running” in “an experiment that is running” (so to that extent, I agree with Greg Lee’s answer). What to call ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.4k
4 votes

Is "running" a gerund or a participial adjective?

There is much good discussion in the other answers. This is an historical note. In Aspects of the Theory of Syntax (1964), Chomsky considered the phrase "the sleeping child", and argued that it is ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
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4 votes

Gerund or Participle?

I agree with johnlee that "waiting" in this sentence should be classified as a participle, not a gerund, if you are working in a framework that makes that distinction. (Comments by members ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.4k
4 votes

Present participle result

TLDR: For whatever reason, questions regarding the possible syntactic structures involving ‑ing phrases / clauses are among the most common questions we get here, especially but hardly exclusively ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 136k
3 votes

Usage Difference between to-infinitive and participle

You are right, in some cases you can use to+infinitive to describe a noun: I have books to read, work to do, people to call. However, this only works with verbs that imply the action would be ...
oerkelens's user avatar
  • 36.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Why is the present participle not considered a principal part?

The present participle can be systematically deduced from a principle part, namely the infinitive. In pronunciation, you just append ing. In writing, it is a little bit more complicated due to the ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 4,404
3 votes

Causative with have/get + object + present participle: when can it be used?

The inference is subtle, but there is a difference. "He had us dancing on the tables" infers the dancing is an indirect consequence - similar to how a comedian may have us rolling on the floor (with ...
Amoque's user avatar
  • 57
3 votes

Is it Gerund or adjective?

Yes, you could. "Coming" is a participle, in the small clause obtained by Whiz deletion
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 77.4k
3 votes

Gerunds vs Participles

It is a participle. You can tell this because it qualifies (describes) "they", the subject of the verb. Being a participle, it is a kind of adjective: a verbal adjective. that is, it is an ...
Tuffy's user avatar
  • 11.3k
3 votes

Present participle of want?

You can use wanting in the following way as the present participle: I've been wanting to tell you something for a long time. This means that your want to tell him/her started a long time ago and you ...
Sujal Motagi's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Present participle of want?

As far as I know, every English verb with an infinitive form also has a “gerund-participle” (a single form traditionally called either a "present participle" or a "gerund" depending on its use) formed ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.4k
2 votes

Using present participle and past tense of an acronym

I'm pretty sure there aren't any rules concerning this, it's something that is fairly new to English and, as far as I am aware, it is colloquial. Regardless, I think that it is generally acceptable to ...
Sam Spade's user avatar
  • 251
2 votes

"What I'm doing is watching TV." — Why does it have to be the gerund-participle ('watching')?

The examples used in the post are wh-type cleft sentences complement of the verb "be". We know cleft clauses relocate information in an otherwise straightforward sentence for emphasis. lt is just ...
Barid Baran Acharya's user avatar
2 votes

Which one is correct: await you going in hell or await you to go in hell?

I want you doing this work everyday. This phrasing is not correct. You should say instead: I want you to do this work everyday. As to the sentences in the body of your question, neither is ...
ΥΣΕΡ26328's user avatar
2 votes

"Winner team" vs. "winning team"

Member of the winning team of...
Ranjit's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes
Accepted

Descriptive words and gerunds or present participles

"looking" is definitely a present participle in this context In the context of "The drow was simply too ordinary looking", the word "looking" is definitely a present ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.4k
2 votes

the first trial <stemming/to stem> from... vs. the first person to climb

Your last examples happen to use an expression that almost always is followed by an infinitive form. The phrase "first person" in this syntax suggests that the following clause will describe ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar

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