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2 votes

What is the usage for constructs like "men at work", "children at play", etc

Signs often adopt an abbreviated syntax, given to quickly informing passersby of what is going on. Context plus the phrase "men at work" is enough to convey that one should drive more slowly ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
2 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

It implies that the person has come up with a good insight which would not be expected given their inexperience and immaturity. Used about a child, it's a definite compliment, because experience and ...
nigel222's user avatar
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3 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

When the phrase is used literally, it applies to children. There's no specific age cutoff. It's not like it's correct to use it to refer to someone who is 8 years and 4 months old but not to someone ...
Jay's user avatar
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5 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

The language, being from the KJV, is archaic, but the idiom is not obsolete, neither is its application strictly to babies. It can instead refer broadly to the relatively inexperienced regardless of ...
Greg Bacon's user avatar
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3 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

This is a common idiom in my experience. However, I would not strictly take it as a compliment; it is intrinsically patronising and as a 15-year-old I would have taken offence, at least a little bit. ...
aantia's user avatar
  • 436
13 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

It's not only used when the very young come up with something wise (or intelligent) beyond their years. It's used when wisdom comes from any unexpected source ... but there is necessarily an ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
7 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

You’re missing the context. Player B is Russian and in his language it’s a common colloquialism aimed anyone younger than you. Player A is Indian and has no idea of Russian colloquialisms or English ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 71
19 votes
Accepted

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

Most dictionaries explain that this biblical passage has survived in modern English as a proverb about children. For example, Dictionary.com points out two qualities of babes this proverb refers to: ...
fev's user avatar
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9 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

This is one of those phrases from the King James Bible which passed into current English when that was the only translation in common use. (Psalm 8 verse 2) It's a comment traditionally made when a ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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