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19 votes
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“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

Most dictionaries explain that this biblical passage has survived in modern English as a proverb about children. For example, Dictionary.com points out two qualities of babes this proverb refers to: ...
fev's user avatar
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18 votes
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What is a word for battery "longevity"?

You may not like longevity or lifespan, but these are the terms used in the technical world. For example, here is how cleantechnica defines longevity: Longevity refers to the number of charge cycles ...
fev's user avatar
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13 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

It's not only used when the very young come up with something wise (or intelligent) beyond their years. It's used when wisdom comes from any unexpected source ... but there is necessarily an ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
10 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

This is one of those phrases from the King James Bible which passed into current English when that was the only translation in common use. (Psalm 8 verse 2) It's a comment traditionally made when a ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
7 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

You’re missing the context. Player B is Russian and in his language it’s a common colloquialism aimed anyone younger than you. Player A is Indian and has no idea of Russian colloquialisms or English ...
Alex's user avatar
  • 71
6 votes

What is a word for battery "longevity"?

Is there a name for that curve of declining ability for a battery to hold charge with frequent use? The term battery health and battery wear level are sometimes used by computer programs which ...
Peter's user avatar
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5 votes
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why are people revealing secrets spilling the tea instead of the beans lately?

Tea has a slang usage also which can be used in expressions similar to “spill the beans”. The origin appears to be from AAVE. As noted in the Wiktionary entry the “tea” is the T for Truth. In slang, ...
Gio's user avatar
  • 4,561
5 votes

What are common words in which written ‹i› is pronounced as the phoneme /ai/?

I’m afraid you aren’t going to be able to do what you’re hoping to do with this—for several concrete reasons. So this answer should be read as a frame challenge. You’ve asked a question that cannot be ...
tchrist's user avatar
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5 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

The language, being from the KJV, is archaic, but the idiom is not obsolete, neither is its application strictly to babies. It can instead refer broadly to the relatively inexperienced regardless of ...
Greg Bacon's user avatar
  • 1,309
4 votes

What is a word for battery "longevity"?

Durability the quality of being able to last a long time without becoming damaged Also described on Wikipedia as: Durability is the ability of a physical product to remain functional, without ...
Clockwork's user avatar
  • 387
4 votes

What is a word for battery "longevity"?

One rather cumbersome word is rechargeability — the ability to be recharged. It's appeared in at least one article, from the University of New South Wales, and in the scholarly article from Advanced ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Is the phrase "as drunk as a marine" still used today?

It was somewhat common in the late 19th century. In the 20th century "drunk as a sailor" took its place. But in the past decade the "sailor" version has started to decline while &...
Barmar's user avatar
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3 votes
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Common usage of "be tried for one's life"

It's not exactly 'in common usage' in the UK, since we no longer have the death penalty, but it would be perfectly well understood in a historical context.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
3 votes

Can 'precedent' mean any preceding event?

While "precedent" is an adjective meaning "preceding", the noun form "precedent" is not used for unrelated events: that's not what the word is taken to mean. For example, ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
3 votes
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In headlines, how did the comma become a substitute for "and"?

The origin of the headline comma is at least decades old and not original to digital media. Headlines don't follow all the conventions of standard written sentences. They can omit articles and ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
3 votes

What is a word for battery "longevity"?

The alternative the OP is looking for is "Service life" (I found that instantly by googling "is there an alternate term for battery longevity?" ... :) )
Fattie's user avatar
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3 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

When the phrase is used literally, it applies to children. There's no specific age cutoff. It's not like it's correct to use it to refer to someone who is 8 years and 4 months old but not to someone ...
Jay's user avatar
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3 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

This is a common idiom in my experience. However, I would not strictly take it as a compliment; it is intrinsically patronising and as a 15-year-old I would have taken offence, at least a little bit. ...
aantia's user avatar
  • 466
2 votes

What is the usage for constructs like "men at work", "children at play", etc

Signs often adopt an abbreviated syntax, given to quickly informing passersby of what is going on. Context plus the phrase "men at work" is enough to convey that one should drive more slowly ...
TaliesinMerlin's user avatar
2 votes

“Out of the mouths of babes”: Is this idiom strictly used to refer to children?

It implies that the person has come up with a good insight which would not be expected given their inexperience and immaturity. Used about a child, it's a definite compliment, because experience and ...
nigel222's user avatar
  • 958
2 votes

What is a word for battery "longevity"?

I believe the term you are looking for is 'useful life', used in economic and financial documents to estimate the number of years an asset is likely to remain in service.
Chris's user avatar
  • 206
2 votes

What is a word for battery "longevity"?

Is there a name for that curve of declining ability for a battery to hold charge with frequent use? No, because the result depends on several extrinsic factors besides the battery itself. Such a ...
Phil Sweet's user avatar
  • 15.8k
1 vote

why are people revealing secrets spilling the tea instead of the beans lately?

The slang term T., tee or tea is from Drag terminology: Tea/T Definition: Slang for the word truth or gossip. Used in a sentence: "Girl, I'm about to spill the tea on everything that happened ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 15.1k
1 vote

In headlines, how did the comma become a substitute for "and"?

My take is that since a comma is used to separate the items in a list, the implication is that it substitutes for an addition. Thus: "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe". We comfortably ...
ben svenssohn's user avatar
1 vote

Why have some younger & (in particular) highly-educated Americans recently begun to pronounce -t- as -d- in words where glottal -t- is idiomatic?

John Lawler writes: It's not new and it's not just older Americans. It's normal American English (and may be normal in the UK as well). The phenomenon is called a neutralization; in this case the ...
1 vote

Is "Son" actually used to address a male child, or is this a literary usage? (As opposed to by name)

It used to be fairly common in the South, usually for the oldest boy in the family. My grandfather was often referred to as "Son Harper". A friend was known as "Son Mcgilvry". When ...
Josie's user avatar
  • 11

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