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3 votes

Is there such a thing as a new adage?

Most of the online dictionary definitions give no age requirement, and in fact many of them add 'old' to their example "…the old adage…" to illustrate their point. Apple built-in dictionary ...
Tetsujin's user avatar
  • 1,922
3 votes

A phrase for something that you enjoy, but is quite bad for you

a guilty pleasure A guilty pleasure is something, such as a film, a television program, a piece of music, or an activity, that one enjoys despite understanding that it is not generally held in high ...
Greybeard's user avatar
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2 votes

Where did the adage, “Love the sinner, hate the sin,” come from?

The Rule of St. Benedict, chapter 64, verse 11: "...hate their evil ways and love the brothers." This was written around 530 AD. It may not be the earliest, but it is very early and very ...
Rex G's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

"The boil must be lanced if it is to heal"?

Yes, it refers to pricking a boil (an infected swelling on the skin) with a surgeon's lancet. Nowadays it's usually recommended not to do so, but no doubt medical advice was different in the 'medieval-...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 25.9k
2 votes

What do you call a phrase that doesn't need to be completed?

I believe you’re thinking of “anapodoton”. Anapodoton originated from the Greek anapodosis which means “without a main clause.” It is generally used for popular idioms or oft used sentences where one ...
Ian's user avatar
  • 29
1 vote

Are there sentimental connotations to the phrase "all grown up"?

It's not uncommon to use "all grown up" in a sentimental manner. This is likely to come from a parent as their child passes various milestones of adulthood, like going off to college or ...
Barmar's user avatar
  • 21k
1 vote
Accepted

Is there such a thing as a new adage?

If you are willing to accept the thesis that a "proverb" is as liable to be old as an "adage," you may be interested in the collection of sayings compiled in Charles Doyle, ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 164k
1 vote

Word/term/saying that encapsulates the notion of something being ethically convenient

It may not be the most accurate answer to your general question, but given the context you provide -- Disingenuous fits https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disingenuous Given the specific ...
Omnivore's user avatar
1 vote

Is "that's what you get" likely to be used sarcastically/to rub something in?

The reference isn't perhaps prestigious, but Calliemaev at HiNative agrees with my take on this: Basically, it [is used to comment on an occasion] when something (usually negative) happens to someone ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
1 vote

Is "that's what you get" likely to be used sarcastically/to rub something in?

The word "get" here means, as TfD defines it, "to meet with or incur," "to be subjected to; undergo," or "to receive as retribution or punishment." The word is ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 18.7k
1 vote

Translation of German "Es wird nichts so heiß gegessen, wie es gekocht wird"

In my personal opinion (austrian german speaking kanguru :)) the food in the phrase "Es wird nichts so heiß gegessen wie es gekocht wird" stands for certain opinions or believes, that are ...
Matt's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote

Translation of German "Es wird nichts so heiß gegessen, wie es gekocht wird"

perhaps context helps, I am familiar with the saying as used by those drafting contracts, where the message conveyed is "strict principles as layed down in contractual clauses are generally not ...
Johhny Stout's user avatar
1 vote

What is the origin of "A cat in hell's chance"

I'd like to add that seen in a middle English dictionary is this index: https://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/middle-english-dictionary/dictionary/MED6929/track?counter=1&search_id=68259026 and one of the ...
Leon's user avatar
  • 11

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