New answers tagged

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According to me, "Thank you so much" tries to compare the thanks to something. For example, If some one threw his hands out wide and said: "The tree is so big", then we would tell that the tree's width or size is more or less the size of what he showed. While "Thank you very much" expresses the thanks from the heart. Take the ...


0

When speaking in first person you should never say “can I …”. Can should only be a statement in first person. For example, I can play the piano. For a student to say: “May I go to the bathroom?” Is correct. In summary, may I is asking permission sometimes, but at a restaurant saying “may I have a cheeseburger, fries and a coke shows very polite manners and ...


1

Such things are almost always down to contemporary ideas of political correctness, and very little more. Beneath that, “disabled“ always includes “handicapped” but not the other way around. Most people won't care, yet a disability is a condition, the cause of which is not relevant. Strictly, a handicap might be exactly the same condition, but the cause ...


6

In Italian, "handicappato" has also been replaced with "disabile", the former was used as an insult to challenge someone's intelligence or behaviour. When I was a child living in the UK, the term handicapped was practically synonymous with "cretin" "stupid" "imbecile" "spastic" and "idiot" ...


0

All PC status words are bound to change with time or generational outlook and of course the temperament of the descriptive sub-culture that is being described. In a perfect world we would all be people, person or human, but too many people feel the need to prioritize or discriminate the people person or human that they are referring to based on their own ...


92

According to linguist John McWhorter the answer is indeed history. Older terms accumulate baggage and are replaced by new terms in what is called the Euphemism Treadmill: Crippled began as a sympathetic term. However, a sad reality of human society is that there are negative associations and even dismissal harboured against those with disabilities. Thus ...


6

The two terms most commonly used to describe a person who has a limitation are "handicapped" and "disabled." A disability is the result of a medically definable condition that limits a person's movements, senses, or activities. A handicap is a barrier or circumstance that makes progress or success difficult, such as an impassable flight ...


4

The term "handicapped" is stronger than the term "disabled." Both refer to a lack of ability, but while disabled means not having one or more of the physical or mental abilities that most people have: handicapped means Having a condition that markedly restricts one's ability to function physically, mentally, or socially. A disability ...


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