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Egypts...loss. jak of all trades they handled much and we're the power. The nun is a part of the faith nun holds the sky up..nun betrayed us with many white nations to seize power. The feast of tabernackels is an exsample This is a count and talley named for the object used in count usualy having many strands of beads in various colors to tab..also there ...


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Interesting topic. Thanks for opening it up. Might want to look into the 1915 lectures from Sigmund Freud and his Reality Principle. A "reality check" very likely originates from his principle and the famous "reality test." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reality_principle


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Probably from forshame: From Middle English forshamen, from Old English forscamian (“to make ashamed, be ashamed, be modest”); equivalent to for- +‎ shame. (Wiktionary) the expression "for shame" dates back to the 14th century as suggested by Dictionary.com


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I am surprised that no one has offered the opinion that the use of this phrase may have originated in the fact that Jesus is represented in the gospel of Mark as teaching that his followers are never to seek to domineer or rule one another, but are to be servants and even slaves of one another because, he says, even "the Son of Man came not to be served,...


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My Model 74 Protectograph, was my grandfathers. I'm 71 today. The check imprinter used black and red ink on the amount line. Besides the inking, it put little horizontal cuts in all the words and numbers. It was a business anti-fraud measure. That's why cutting a check applied to business checks, but not personal ones.


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The English form consisting of a verb (bare form) followed by not is a common literary device. Here is a charming explanation of it in a book called : **The Mother Tongue: an elementary English grammar by George Lyman Kittredge, ‎Sarah Louise Arnold · 1908 · ‎English language The Mother Tongue In poetry and the solemn style prohibition is often expressed ...


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“Going home” here means that participant was eliminated from a reality TV competition (in this case, Strictly Come Dancing). It’s pretty a pretty common expression in this context. Here are some examples: Elimination Tracker: Here’s Every Celeb Who’s Gone Home on Dancing With the Stars This Season (and Why!) ‘American Idol’s Disney Night — Did the Right ...


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The OED's first citation is 1551, from Thomas Becon, A Fruitful Treatise of Fasting, which describes how Satan "setteth forth him selfe in his true colours". It's also in Shakespeare, Henry IV Pt 2 (1600) act 2 scene 2: "How might we see Falstaffe bestow himself to night in his true colours, and not our selues be seene?" The sense of &...


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Here's an example of the phrase in actual use. The Florida flew the British flag till she was fired at , when she hauled it down , and ( according to Captain Semmes's account ) hoisted Confederate colours . The unlucky Captain of the Oneida said in his report that his enemy “ had no flag to fight under . ” The discrepancy is immaterial , since she did not ...


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A "Professional Bias" can imply/mean two things. 1 - A professional bias is when a skill that you have spent years growing is then unfairly compared to someones skill that is at its starting stage. Example - Professional engineer builds machine, beginner has trouble building table and is looked down upon. 2 - A professional bias is when you think ...


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