New answers tagged

0 votes

Meaning of . . . “you just meet me on the ballast, and we'll make it a barquentine.”

The two lines immediately before this quote are “Just hold on,” said Nares. “There's another point. I heard some talk about a supercargo.” “That's Mr. Dodd, here, my partner,” said Jim. As @...
Henry's user avatar
  • 20.1k
1 vote

I know it was a liberty—I made it out you were no business man, only a stone-broke painter; that half the time you didn't know anything anyway

If you are using the online OED, and you are at make verb1, you should see a tab (near Etymology, Pronunciation, etc.) for Phrasal verbs. There you can find: make verb PV.1. With adverbs in ...
Tinfoil Hat's user avatar
  • 15.2k
1 vote

I know it was a liberty—I made it out you were no business man, only a stone-broke painter; that half the time you didn't know anything anyway

The Cambridge dictionary definition is the correct one. The presence of "it" is a variant or an irrelevance (remember that the Stevenson work is 100 years old now - languages change). From ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 25.2k
1 vote

What is the difference between "Chinese-Canadian" and "Canadian-Chinese"?

"a Chinese-Canadian" and “a Canadian-Chinese"? The phrases are couplings of substantives. They operate in the same way as “noun1 noun2”. noun1 noun2 = noun2 contextually associated ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 40.4k
2 votes
Accepted

with a conscience

From the context, it looks like a variant of in conscience, which Oxfoird Languages defines as by any fair or reasonable standard. "how can we in all conscience justify the charging of fees for ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 24.3k
0 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between "Chinese-Canadian" and "Canadian-Chinese"?

Yes, the first is 'ethnicity', the second is current 'citizenship'. However, I would hesitate to recommend using such terms, if they can be avoided. I as a 'German-Brit'* object to this classification ...
Tetsujin's user avatar
  • 1,889

Top 50 recent answers are included