3 votes

Speaking of a fitted bed sheet, would you call it “inside-out” or “upside-down”if you wanted to indicate that the stitches are facing up?

"Fitted sheet" is really a "border line" term when it comes to deciding whether the device named by this word has an inside and an outside or rather a bottom and a top. There are ...
LPH's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

What "On your approach" means in this context?

The game is using aviation terminology. An "approach" is the phase of the flight where you are "approaching" something - usually an airport if you are a normal plane, a target if ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Is Weasel Poo on a Door Knob a Recognised Expression?

There are many similar expressions for something being smooth, either literally or in the sense "excessively and often artfully suave, ingratiating" (Merriam-Webster). If you're faced by an ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 9,667
1 vote

When did "light (something) up" begin to mean shooting?

J.E. Lighter, The Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1997) has the following relevant entries for "light up": light up v. ... 2.a. to fire a gun. 1953–55 Fine Delinquents ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
1 vote

When did "light (something) up" begin to mean shooting?

The first citation in print with the meaning "to shoot, destroy with gunfire" is from 1967, in Puerto Rican writer Piri Thomas's Down These Mean Streets: You’d smack him down like Whiplash ...
Stuart F's user avatar
  • 9,667
1 vote

A phrase in American English that, as a native British speaker, I may have misheard

MetaEd commented: It is a reference to the law firm of Gray, Cary. The True Story of Betty Broderick’s Divorce (Oprah Daily)
1 vote

I've got my work cut out for me. Origin, meaning, negation by sarcasm?

By way of confirming the figurative sense of the expression that Carl suggests in an answer posted earlier in the week, I offer this brief entry from Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
1 vote

What is the origin of "to lie through one's teeth"?

Please see Homer’s Odyssey,Book 1, Line 63 (tr. Murray): My child, what a word has escaped the barrier of your teeth! Where Zeus accuses his daughter, Athene, of saying untruthfully that he has ...
Nigel Smith's user avatar

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