11 votes

How would you name the different types of periods? ~ Translating ‘punto seguido’, ‘punto y aparte’ and ‘punto final’

In English, we can distinguish the sentences within a paragraph, such as the first or opening sentence, the last or closing sentence, and often a topic sentence that states the main idea of the ...
DjinTonic's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

How would you name the different types of periods? ~ Translating ‘punto seguido’, ‘punto y aparte’ and ‘punto final’

As others have posted, English does not have different names for periods in different positions. However, possibly relevant: I use speech recognition software and dictate much of what I would ...
Krazy Glew's user avatar
9 votes

What is the correct punctuation after "as follows"?

Semicolons to separate the chapters, as proposed in another answer, is certainly a valid approach. However, I'd like to answer from a different angle - one that comes from my experience with lists in ...
EditingFrank's user avatar
  • 1,879
8 votes
Accepted

Is "et al" always accompanied by a period?

Yes, it should always be accompanied by a period. Since et al. is the abbreviation of and others, where et al. could be an abbreviation for et alii, et aliae or et alia when referring to masculine, ...
3kstc's user avatar
  • 2,478
8 votes

What is the correct punctuation after "as follows"?

Here is a quick review of the advice that four influential style guides give for punctuating the lead-in to a display (vertical) list. The most important thing to note at the outset is that most of ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
6 votes
Accepted

Can a sentence have two or more successive separate sentences in its womb?

This is an interesting question about style. According to Strunk and White, the final full stop should be omitted unless the sentence is "wholly detached", which I take to mean that the sentence does ...
Lawrence's user avatar
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6 votes

When should end punctuation go inside quotes?

According to the IEEE Style Guide (archive link here), In American English, commas, semicolons, periods, question and exclamation marks are located within quotation marks only when a complete ...
WBT's user avatar
  • 3,544
5 votes
Accepted

Rule of punctuation when a principal sentence is followed by two or more subordinate sentences

I certainly wouldn't ever punctuate in that way nor, I should hope would I ever write in such a tortuous manner. It either needs to be bullet-pointed, or else written as a piece of prose, with ...
WS2's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Does a period, semicolon, comma, or nothing go there?

A Google search for "He's quite dead. I assure you." (which as expected shows more hits than the "I'm" version, if not many more) only gives examples of your versions B and A. Comma splices are not ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
3 votes

Can the period be dropped in "vs" when used as part of a compound modifier?

I checked the two most influential (in the sense of "widely used by publishers") U.S. style guides— The Associated Press Stylebook (2002) and The Chicago Manual of Style (2003)—to see how ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
3 votes

How many spaces should come after a period/full stop?

In sixth grade I was told the proper way to finish a sentence was with 2 spaces after a period and the majority of people think it looks cleaner as well.
Zoe's user avatar
  • 79
3 votes

Should there be a space between name initials?

No spaces, no periods, as mentioned on the CMOS website: Chicago style for initials that are used as a name is to take out the periods and close up the letters: BJ. Please see CMOS 8.4.
Laurel's user avatar
  • 66.4k
3 votes

How to use a the possessive "s" after a dot?

The New Yorker has a convention of writing Jr.,’s in such cases, as in Donald Trump, Jr.,’s love (source). It seems odd, but they present their rationale here.
E...'s user avatar
  • 131
3 votes

Where do I put the period when I'm quoting?

There is no single set of "British rules" for when you put a full stop inside and when you put it outside the quotation marks. Different British publishers have different rules. Look at this ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
3 votes

How would you name the different types of periods? ~ Translating ‘punto seguido’, ‘punto y aparte’ and ‘punto final’

This isn't really a concept that English speakers find necessary to name, but one term you could use for punto y aparte would be "paragraph-final period". For punto final, you could use &...
Acccumulation's user avatar
2 votes

If you're using a quote with a period but do not want to end the sentence, do you keep the period?

This grammar question, as in the case of many others, is most efficiently answered by adhering to a single style guide. As Dale Emery suggested, the Chicago Manual of Style is pretty awesome for ...
Devana's user avatar
  • 116
2 votes

Punctuation with US measurements

Units of Weight and Measure, International (Metric) and U.S. Customary, National Bureau of Standards Miscellaneous Publication 286, May 1967, page 10, says, "No period is used with symbols for units." ...
Ken's user avatar
  • 104
2 votes

Is a period used after a stand alone phrase?

No, you don't need one. I agree with you that it looks better without one. Consider UPS whose slogan is "synchronizing the world of commerce". They don't use a period: The following image has quite ...
Michael's user avatar
  • 1,807
2 votes

Rule of punctuation when a principal sentence is followed by two or more subordinate sentences

The simple answer is: punctuation is a style issue not a grammar issue. Typesetting is a specialty form of editing to improve readers' comprehension. Your passage is awful; it is an affront to my eyes....
Stu W's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Are .). and .), correct notations?

The Chicago Manual of Style (13th ed) says: Although the use of etc. in running text is to be discouraged, it should, when used, be set off by commas: The firm manufactured nuts, bolts, ...
rajah9's user avatar
  • 16.2k
2 votes

Punctuating a quoted question within a quoted statement

The Chicago Manual of Style, sixteenth edition (2010), offers the following advice, under the general heading "Multiple Punctuation Marks": 6.118 Periods with question marks or exclamation points. ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
2 votes

What is the correct punctuation after "as follows"?

Folwer's Modern English Usage regarding the colon: ". . . but the time when it was second member of the hierarchy, full stop, colon, semicolon, comma, is past. Some contemporary writers ...
Zan700's user avatar
  • 3,376
2 votes

Using slash (/) as an abbreviation

Is there any grammar rule for an abbreviation? Yes. Use an abbreviation only if your potential readers will immediately recognize and understand the abbreviation. You want to communicate clearly ...
Mark D Worthen PsyD's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Using slash (/) as an abbreviation

There are a dozen or so "abbreviations" which employ the "/" character and which are generally recognized in US English. A few that come to mind: w/o -- without w/ -- with (probably derived from "w/...
Hot Licks's user avatar
  • 27.5k
2 votes

History of Periods in Ads, Headlines

The New York Times used a period at the end of their front page title until about 1967, I believe. Interesting that this just came up when our family received a book of old NYT front pages and noticed ...
Nicole PH's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Yeah. No! Or Yeah, no!

The meaning of the phrase (as I have always heard and used it) is essentially an emphatic yet somewhat sarcastic, "yes, I understand you, but the answer is still no." If your intended meaning matches ...
James McLeod's user avatar
  • 9,207
2 votes

How can I unambiguously differentiate between the absence or presence of a period in a quote?

One option is to italicize the word okay: This happened after she told me okay. This type of italicization is known as "using the word as a word." If you followed British punctuation ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
1 vote

how to express period until event

When you say that something will happen "in X time," you're saying that the duration from now until then is X. If the current day is Monday, and the event is on Friday, four days will elapse between ...
Evan's user avatar
  • 1,347
1 vote
Accepted

How does one end a sentence correctly when using a quote excerpt?

You do not need to include the ellipsis on either side of the quoted text—because the quote does not begin with a capital letter, it is implied that it is not the start of a sentence. ...
Lisa P.'s user avatar
  • 325

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