42

The crucial thing is that the last but one syllable of "vomited" has no stress. Not even secondary stress. So the final consonant doesn't double. By contrast, the last but one syllable of "emitted" has stress (because the last syllable of "emit" has stress). This issue is raised in this question, to which a good answer is given. Compare: (No stress) ...


8

It can be difficult to determine the telicity of a verb, but all verbs must be telic or atelic in context. Imagining a verb that is neither telic nor atelic is rather like imagining a binary number that is neither 1 nor 0, or imagining an object that is neither tea nor not tea. Because a telic aspect indicates that an action or event is complete in some ...


5

If you understand telic to be a description of the utterance in terms of whether it presents a completed act, then the following are telic utterances: John built a house. John built the house in only a month. but depending on what the speaker means to say in context, this could be atelic: John was building that house for a year (i.e. when he ...


4

Here are a four discussions of the question from U.S. usage authorities (or commentators) who have substantial followings. First, from Barbara Wallraff, Your Own Words (2004) [combined snippets]: "A TV commentator recently referred to a new software package as having been troubleshooted. Does a suitable past-tense verb exist for something that has ...


4

The "historical present" doesn't have to be used in all sentences. It's fine to use the present tense "on all subsequent pages" despite using the past tense in the first two sentences. The customer's complaint isn't justified, so I would simply ignore the complaint and leave the tense as it is. Leaving out "Once upon a time" would substantially change the ...


4

Hear, see, watch, notice and similar verbs of perception can be followed by object + infinitive without to or object + -ing form. There is usually a difference of meaning between the two structures. The infinitive is used after these verbs when we want to say that we hear or see the whole of an action or event. The gerund –ing form is used to suggest that ...


3

"Earnt" clearly exists, both as a spelling and as a corresponding pronunciation that is distinct from "earned". The formation of "earnt" is irregular, but not randomly so: the past-tense/past-participle marker takes or may take the form -t after /n/ in some other words, such as burnt, learnt, or after the phonologically similar sounds /l/ (felt, knelt) or /...


3

I would take "A man had four daughters" as meaning the same as "A man fathered four daughters". It recounts events of fathering. It doesn't have any particular implications about whether or not the man or any of his daughters still survives.


3

It depends on what you want to say. It can be that it's still the worst thing you've ever eaten or it was worse than anything you had tried before the point in time you're talking about.


3

After clarification from a comment under the question, Reserves is short for Army Reserves. To avoid confusion, I will add that word to the sentence. Some Tuesday nights in the Army Reserves were set aside for classroom time. The subject of this sentence is Tuesday nights in the Army Reserves. Or, in simplified form, just Tuesday nights. It means that ...


3

Both are in use, with greenlit being slightly more common than greenlighted according to COCA (32 vs 21 hits). See for yourself by searching for greenli*.


3

This is a very confused question. Let's take it one thing at a time: Is it possible to use modal verbs in Past Perfect? This question has no answer because There is no Past Perfect Tense in English. Modal verbs are not inflected for tenses anyway. So, on the face of it, the answer to that question, asked that way, is No. However, that doesn't appear ...


2

You cannot use the present tense to describe habitual actions in the past. If you have an aversion to using 'would' or 'used to', you need to use the simple past tense - "I went to class every Tuesday" and so on.


2

It isn't incorrect (except that 'I' should always be in upper case). As a sentence on its own, it's probably better with 'saw', but you could say something like "While I was travelling I had seen some beautiful buildings, but the new art gallery in my home town was as fine as any of them".


2

Let's assume a situation. I went shopping and while coming back from shopping I meet someone and ask me where did you go? (again I don't know whether it is "where have you gone" or "where did you go?") The question in this situation can be: a. Where did you go? b. Where were you? or Where have you been? but it'd be weird to ask: c. ??Where have ...


2

Your examples are reduced relative clause constructions. "the table painted red" is from "the table which is/was painted red" by deleting the "which is" part. The deletion transformation has been called "WHIZ". In turn, for this example, the "is/was" is part of a passive construction, the active form for which would be "someone paints/painted the table red"...


2

If Ring toss is still your favorite game (of all games you ever played), you say: My favorite game is Ring toss. If Ring toss was your favorite game from the games available at that specific Funfair, but it is not your favorite game in general, you say: My favorite game was Ring toss. If the same rules apply no matter where and when the game is ...


2

You can use other verbs with similar meaning, such as activate or toggle. There are also other conventions you can use. You may use something like flagIsSet or isFlagSet, for example.


2

Wecome to EL&U. "Passed primary school" means either that you achieved an academic score which allowed you to progress beyond primary school (that is the equivalent of "passed the baccalaureate" for secondary school) or that you drove or walked past the primary school building. "Past primary school" is closer to what you intend but is not the most ...


2

You need the past perfect (also called the pluperfect) tense: I was waiting in the back of the line because I had punched the son of the principal. The past perfect tense indicates an action that was completed at some point in the past before something else happened. If you search for "past perfect tense" you will find plenty of examples online. (By ...


2

There is no rule that says you can't have the present tense and past tense in the same sentence. In any case, your sentence contains no present tense verb. Both verbs are in the past tense. When the phrase not only introduces a clause it requires inversion of the subject and the verb as well as the addition of an auxiliary. It is the auxiliary which ...


2

Probably is "Greenlighted" reference: So far three directors have greenlighted the project. This meaning is based on one submitted to the Open Dictionary by: Boris Marchenko from Russian Federation on 30/08/2015


2

Either use is acceptable: TFD tr.v. greenlighted or greenlit As in: "[He] commissioned the pilot that became 'Captain Kangaroo' and greenlighted the series" (Variety). or 1992 Premiere Feb. 47/2 There he green-lit both The Silence of the Lambs and The Addams Family.


2

Archetype: a statement, pattern of behavior, a prototype, a "first" form or a main model which other statements, patterns of behavior, and objects copy, emulate or "merge" into. (Frequently used informal synonyms for this usage include "standard example", "basic example", and the longer form "archetypal example". Mathematical archetypes often appear as "...


2

This is an abuse of grammar, which does not belong to Standard English. It should be We haven't had any 'easy' sales on television yet. Some examples frop published literature that use the phrase haven't had any: Since I've been in the minority I haven't had any carrots or sticks to move my members. (source) I haven't had any brothers or sisters ...


2

There is no reason you couldn’t use the simple past tense in the first example. I explained this rule to you for half a lesson before I gave a test There is also no reason you couldn’t use the past perfect tense in the second sentence. They had been married for a few years before divorcing in 2016. These are both grammatical, as are your original ...


1

Present Perfect is OK with just (it points at the latest moment), but then you don't need Past Perfect: Past Simple is enough here to put the reported event before the event 'he has (said)'.


1

Note that the second sentence wouldn't normally be phrased in the way that you've phrased it. Depending on the tense, it would more commonly take one of these forms: I will get used to smoking. I am getting used to smoking. I got used to smoking. 1. I am used to smoking. This is a simple statement of fact. 2. I get used to smoking. This ...


1

The past perfect tense for your sentence is I HAD been teamed up. The other sentence I HAVE been teamed up. becomes present perfect.


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