50

Override is formed from the irregular verb ride. The Principal Parts of ride are ride, rode, ridden. That means the PPs of override are override, overrode, overridden. With me so far? OK, the first PP in each case is the Infinitive form (to ride, to override). The second PP is the Past form (They rode it, They overrode it) The third PP is the Perfect ...


47

Surprisingly, some dictionaries such as Collins and Dictionary.com do list sightsee as a verb, with sightsaw as the past form. On the other hand, I have never heard anybody actually say it. I have heard plenty of people say went sightseeing. A quick trip to Ngram to compare the usage of sightsaw against went sightseeing comes up with plenty of instances of ...


42

The crucial thing is that the last but one syllable of "vomited" has no stress. Not even secondary stress. So the final consonant doesn't double. By contrast, the last but one syllable of "emitted" has stress (because the last syllable of "emit" has stress). This issue is raised in this question, to which a good answer is given. Compare: (No stress) ...


39

Either is possible. In my personal opinion it comes down to context. Was this a fleeting acquaintance or someone you are likely to take up with in the future? Examples I met this guy yesterday, his name was John. He was very rude - I hope I never meet him again! I met this guy yesterday, his name is John. We're going to meet up for coffee. Come along and ...


29

Rarely, must is used as a past tense. Belshazzar, by H. Rider Haggard, has we went because we must, in a prose style which is perhaps deliberately archaic to reflect the ancient Egyptian context. In this odd snippet, If Thoreau went because he would, Hawthorne went because he must, one might say the author is "playing with language". But here's Ralph Waldo ...


29

The verb be followed by a to-infinitive is used in historical narratives to convey that something took place later than the narrative moment. In your example, Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice. the translator uses this construction to ...


23

(btw, there should be a full stop after wonderful time; otherwise it's a comma splice.) Here's the way it works. There are four senses of the English Perfect Construction. Normally the fixed phrase I've had a wonderful time would be interpreted in its Universal sense: "used to indicate that a state of affairs prevailed throughout some interval ...


22

Drownd is an archaic form of drown from which drownded is an archaic form of drowned. It is still found in some dialects either by survival or by emphasis of the -ed since the rhymes-with-round sound of drowned may not sound as obviously past-tense to some ears as others. It's incorrectly frowned upon as incorrect, by people whose dialects did not retain ...


22

"Could of" is always wrong. It's just that the contracted "have" in "could've" sounds like "of", so uneducated people started writing it as "of" too. (For the record, "should of", "would of", "might of", and the like are also always wrong.)


20

This is rather a knotty little group of verbs that have gone all over the place in Modern English, though they were very clearly and regularly distinguished in Old English. Let’s start with the etymology, and then move on to current usage.   Etymology The words watch, (a)wake, (a)waken all share a common root. The Proto-Indo-European root was *u̯eǵ-,...


18

Backed up is the correct form. I never saw anyone spell it backuped or backup-ed until today. Also see the n-gram chart.


17

X won't/wouldn't Y is often used to mean X refuses/refused to Y Other examples: I am trying to talk to Jack, but he won't listen. (= he refuses to listen) I tried everything to open that can, but it just wouldn't give in. Also, this construct implies certain effort. When you say My car wouldn't start. you're implying that you kept trying ...


16

nohat's answer speaks well to some of the trends with such forms, but not to the question of why such cases happen as per the question's title. Indeed, if we accept swimmed, then we have a verb with three past tense forms; swimmed, swam and swum. However swimmed is not normally considered standard. Abided, abode and abidden would be another example, but ...


16

This is called the historic present. It is also called historical present, dramatic present, narrative present, or praesens historicum in Latin. It is a perfectly fine construction, although it should be used in moderation so as not to draw the ire of style books.


15

It is correct. Come is a past participle here, not a simple present. It means a dream [that has/is] come true. The past participle come can be used with the verb be, which is why a dream come true is possible; this is normally possible with all verbs that can be or once could be used with be. a horse [that was] left behind a day [that has/is] gone by


15

The person was logged in to the website. log in is a phrasal verb so only the first part of the verb changes when you wish to change the tense. It follows the same rule as sit down (She sat down.) or drop out (He dropped out of school.) See also the usage note for log in on dictionary.com.


15

This question is difficult to answer succinctly because the more desirable wording to use may differ depending on the circumstances surrounding the statement. Case 1: When Maybonne was your girlfriend, she often ate at Red Lobster. Now that she is your ex-girlfriend, she may or may not eat there. If you know that she still does, it makes sense to say "My ex-...


14

This is a specific usage, in its original context and native habitat, of what is technically called the Hot News sense of the English Perfect construction. There are four senses in all (cf. McCawley 1971): (a) The Universal sense of the Perfect, used to indicate that a state of affairs prevailed throughout some interval stretching from the past into the ...


14

They're not quite the same. Used to carries an extra Presupposition about the present, to the effect that if X used to VP in the past, then it is presupposed that X no longer VPs. I lived in Prague 5 years ago and I've lived in Prague ever since. *I used to live in Prague 5 years ago and I've lived in Prague ever since. This can lead to interesting ...


13

The reason that must does not seem to have a past tense in English is that etymologically it already was a past (or preterite) tense of motan. Compare with the modern Dutch where ik moet means I have to while ik moest means I had to. If you will not use had to, you can often use needed to, which fits your examples, or something similar.


13

The OED (Oxford English Dictionary) gives drownded as an alternative to drowned and there are ten citations throughout the dictionary illustrating its earlier use, but its use now is described as ‘vulgar’. Stick to drowned.


13

That is a perfectly valid use of the word "now" and does not change the tense. Now (Definition) 1.5 (in a narrative or account of past events) at the time spoken of or referred to


12

The rule is that there is at most one tense marker in each clause. There may be no tense markers, as in the gerund clause going to the Moon or the infinitive clause to go to the Moon; but there can't be more than one. In I visited the bank the single (past) tense marker is the -ed in visited. In I did visit the bank the single (past) tense marker is the ...


12

Had/has/have been is usually used for something that was done in the past and still applies (multiple events). Was/were usually applies to something done in the past that no longer applies (single event). Example: The well had been producing clean water. The well was producing clean water. The first sentence implies that the well still is producing ...


12

OED lists lightning as a verb and includes the past tense form lightninged: Lightning, v.: = lighten v.2 6. Also fig 1903 Westm. Gaz. 16 Nov. 8/2 The two metal balls..thundered and lightninged as they delivered the message. 1926 H. Caine in Strand Mag. Jan. 20/1 Mr. Gladstone leapt to his feet, whereupon the air of the House thundered ...


12

The OED’s etymology for this word is: The form shite represents OE. *scítan, pa. t. *scát, pa. pple. -sciten (in be-sciten), corresponding to OFris. *skîta (NFris. skĭtj, pa. t. skäd, pa. pple. skedden), MLG. schîten, Dutch schijten, OHG. scîȥan (MHG. schîȥan, mod.G. scheissen), ONor. skíta (MSw. skîta, Da. skide), f. OTeut. root skī̆t-. The now more ...


11

The Chicago Manual of Style devotes Section 147 of its "Grammar and Usage" chapter to must: Must denotes a necessity that arises from someone’s will [we must obey the rules] or from circumstances [you must ask what the next step is] [he went to New York because he must]. Must also connotes a logical conclusion [that must be the right answer] [that ...


11

If I found a ball in the morning, I might say in the afternoon I found a ball today. The past tense locates an action at a specific time in the past, but today is a sufficiently prolonged period of time to allow the use of the past tense on the same day. I have found a ball today could occur, but only exceptionally, because the perfect construction is not ...


11

Whether or not an action is repeated has no bearing on the choice between the past tense and the present perfect construction. The first describes actions at a particular time in the past and the second relates past actions to the time of speaking. You wouldn’t say I have seen that movie twelve times on Tuesday because Tuesday is a particular time in the ...


11

I have a friend who insists that 1.) "I didn't know you like her" is more correct than 2.) "I didn't know you liked her" if the liking is still taking place. But to my ear, only the latter (#2) sounds correct. Which of the above (if any) is correct and why? * Trust your ear. :) Your ear knows. As in all things dealing with ...


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