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43

Your pedant is completely wrong, not just because he's protesting in futility to a well-established idiom, but because his grammatical analysis of the construction is mistaken. That being said is an adverbial participle phrase. Note that the verbal portion of the phrase, being said, does not contain a finite verb, and only finite verbs are tensed. (This is ...


30

I don't think there is a specific term for the loss of -ed in these contexts. Rather, what you have is the interplay of a few different general trends. The first factor is simply phonological. Iced cream, pronounced very deliberately, has a [stkr] cluster in the middle. In rapid speech, this is going to be reduced to [skr] anyway. The same is true of every ...


17

"This being Silverlight" in the context means "Because this is Silverlight" or "Since this is Silverlight"


15

Interminable From the Free dictionary: Being or seeming to be without an end; endless. ... Tiresomely long; tedious. We've been driving for hours! Every time we round a bend or top a hill, the road just keeps going. It's interminable! It goes on forever! Edit after the question was revised: It was a long road, stretching interminably as it went, ...


13

Actually, venomed exists and you can find it here. In literature I have seen the expression venomed arrows, meaning covered with venom, but according to this source it also means poisoned as the past participle of the verb venom.


13

It's a quote. One of the very first anthems of the women's movement was Helen Reddy's 1970s hit "I Am Woman" (see Wikipedia for the song's history). Its opening lines are I am woman, hear me roar In numbers too big to ignore The line "I am woman, hear me roar" has since become something of a catchphrase (Wikipedia). Katy Perry's song of empowerment ...


11

The word you're looking for is participle. Wikipedia has a good summary, including the following discussion of English participles: English verbs have two participles: called variously the present, active, imperfect, or progressive participle, it is identical in form to the gerund; the term present participle is sometimes used to include the ...


10

So, in traditional grammar these cases would be considered gerunds, not present participles, because they head noun phrases. Modern grammatical analyses of English (such as the Cambridge Grammar of the English Language) analyse gerunds and present participles as a single construct called the gerund-participle. In any case, this error is common because some ...


10

Both are grammatical. The first uses the past tense (‘was lost’), which indicates that the connection was lost at a specific time in the past. The second uses the present perfect construction (‘has been lost’), which indicates that the loss of the connection has present relevance. So, if the loss of connection occurred, let us say, last week, but it’s now ...


10

In biology, the term envenomated (past participle of envenomate) is used for this; Google Books turns up uses like: Distribution of Venoms in Envenomated Animals Called strike-induced chemosensory searching (SICS), this phenomenon facilitates location of an envenomated rodent which might wander several meters from the snake after the strike. The first ...


9

I do not know if there is more specific term (probably there is), but for now I can offer morphological clipping, shortening or truncation specifically it is back clipping or apocope in hope that it will bring you closer to the specific term that deals with dropping of -ed specifically.


9

That being said, ... can be rewritten as After saying all that, ... . In the statement said is acting as an adjective, so is equivalent to that statement being said, or analogous to that ball being bouncy. You could point at a ball and say that being bouncy, you can use it to entertain your dog. It is fine to use said in an adjectival form in this sense, ...


9

I think this is an example of "recency illusion," which you described very well as the situation where "increasing observation" is caused by "increasing awareness." From one point of view, the past participle could be said to be disappearing. But there are a lot of caveats, and the process has been going on for much longer than any single person's lifetime. ...


8

"Working" is a present participle. According to this article, "A Present Participle is used with the verb 'To Be' to indicate an action that is incomplete". Therefore, if the register interface is a completed action, the first sentence is the better choice. If not, then the second sentence is correct. Personally, I would say the first sentence is better, ...


8

To envenom someone or something is to make it poisonous or to add poison to it. So, if using poison in the figurative sense of fouling, embittering, spoiling, etc. it would be acceptable, as in envenoming a relationship. It would not be suitable when using poison in the sense of murdering someone by poison, or adulterating something lethally.


8

Neither is correct. Acceptable alternatives include: I've not been able to make up my mind. I'm not able to make up my mind. If you expand I'm to I am, the wrongness of your examples becomes clearer.


7

The answer is A. "a soft orange blanket covering the desert". You have to consider this part of the sentence separately. You can say X is like Y X was like Y X will be like Y for identical values of Y Update: The whole sentence is a slightly simplified form of "The wild flowers looked like a soft orange blanket [which was] covering the desert" How ...


7

This participial construction is 100% correct and natural. The participle is used as an attribute to the subject of the main clause, "we" (or "a Zhongguancun-based English training school", but that doesn't matter because it results in the same meaning). It gives extra information about "we", just as an adjective would. This attribute is placed after its "...


7

Linux-dependent is the right usage.


7

McCawley doesn't say much about it, as far as I can see, but it appears to be a variety of the complex of serial verb constructions around motion verbs and their inchoatives and causatives, like the various serial verb constructions mentioned in this freshman grammar exam question (#4, restricted to come and go): Bill went and dug some clams. (go and + V) ...


7

I would interpret them differently. "I hate Jill singing those songs" implies that you hate her actions (singing) when she sings those songs. Whereas "I hate Jill when she is singing those songs" emphasises that you hate her (Jill) when she sings rather than hating her singing.


6

I think your friend has a point. I will not comment on whether this construction is acceptable; I will just explain why it is somewhat irregular. Consider this sentence: Its walls being assaulted by the Crusaders, Constantinople got little sleep that night. It is clear that the city's being assaulted does not precede the waking of its inhabitants: being ...


6

"Advance search" suggests a search that you did before some event, e.g. "my advance search led me to this particular car dealer". "Advanced search" means that the search operation was in some way advanced, which sounds like the case you're describing. However, I'm not used to seeing "advanced" (or "simple") used in this way. If I'm talking about an ...


6

"That being said" I interpret as "That, now in a state of in the record of the current conversation, ..." So it's similar to "That being a Ford..." or "That being green". "Said" is an adjective in this case.


6

Workingest is not an accepted word in English (American or British). This verb+ing+est word structure is a form that is very occasionally used in uneducated circles or when attempting a casual, "folksy" style for a superlative. You can find various examples of the form being used at low frequencies, such as drinkingest, fightingest, cussingest, etc.


6

The past participle of "fly" is "flew." I don't know the song, but Coldplay probably used it either because it rhymed with what they needed to, or to sound "cool." In baseball, a "fly ball" is a ball that is hit high up into the air. Many people use "flied" to distinguish describing hitting the ball ("he flied out"; meaning someone caught his fly ball) from ...


6

It’s called a participial phrase, specifically one using the present not the past participle. If you want more than that, you’ll have to chase down all about VPs (verb phrases) in English.


6

Perpetual adj. never ending or changing. Continuing or lasting for an indefinitely long time Perpetually adv. everlastingly; for all time; "rays...streaming perpetually from the sun" Endless and Endlessly having or seeming to have no end or limit and continuing forever without end It was a an endless road, stretching perpetually ahead of us, as if it ...


6

How about "splashing is forbidden?" Splashing seems to function as either a noun or a verb. It could be modified by an adverb to fit the verb test: Loudly splashing is forbidden. Or it could be modified with an adjective to fit the noun test: That loud splashing is forbidden. A psycholinguistic perspective Ultimately, to address the meat of the ...


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