15

Interminable From the Free dictionary: Being or seeming to be without an end; endless. ... Tiresomely long; tedious. We've been driving for hours! Every time we round a bend or top a hill, the road just keeps going. It's interminable! It goes on forever! Edit after the question was revised: It was a long road, stretching interminably as it went, ...


13

It's a quote. One of the very first anthems of the women's movement was Helen Reddy's 1970s hit "I Am Woman" (see Wikipedia for the song's history). Its opening lines are I am woman, hear me roar In numbers too big to ignore The line "I am woman, hear me roar" has since become something of a catchphrase (Wikipedia). Katy Perry's song of empowerment ...


9

I think this is an example of "recency illusion," which you described very well as the situation where "increasing observation" is caused by "increasing awareness." From one point of view, the past participle could be said to be disappearing. But there are a lot of caveats, and the process has been going on for much longer than any single person's lifetime. ...


8

McCawley doesn't say much about it, as far as I can see, but it appears to be a variety of the complex of serial verb constructions around motion verbs and their inchoatives and causatives, like the various serial verb constructions mentioned in this freshman grammar exam question (#4, restricted to come and go): Bill went and dug some clams. (go and + V) ...


7

Yes There are constructions called zeugmas (after Greek ζεῦγμα, 'a yoking') where a word or phrase is intentionally made to apply to two or more others in a sentence despite functioning differently for each. The horde of words in English that can function as various parts of speech mean that zeugmas can be created where a single word simultaneously acts as ...


7

I would interpret them differently. "I hate Jill singing those songs" implies that you hate her actions (singing) when she sings those songs. Whereas "I hate Jill when she is singing those songs" emphasises that you hate her (Jill) when she sings rather than hating her singing.


6

How about "splashing is forbidden?" Splashing seems to function as either a noun or a verb. It could be modified by an adverb to fit the verb test: Loudly splashing is forbidden. Or it could be modified with an adjective to fit the noun test: That loud splashing is forbidden. A psycholinguistic perspective Ultimately, to address the meat of the ...


6

ᴛʟ;ᴅʀ Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence, under the same parse and meaning? So, if a grammatical English sentence contains a word A, can A be more than one POS? Parts of speech are grammatical terms and have varying meanings for different grammarians. ...


5

Perpetual adj. never ending or changing. Continuing or lasting for an indefinitely long time Perpetually adv. everlastingly; for all time; "rays...streaming perpetually from the sun" Endless and Endlessly having or seeming to have no end or limit and continuing forever without end It was a an endless road, stretching perpetually ahead of us, as ...


5

Since the same words can be adjectives and adverbs, sentences could be constructed where the word modifies a noun and a verb: She is and runs fast. While others cheat, my children are and play fair. In Yellowstone National Park, bison roam, and truly are, free.


4

Way too many markers have been deleted from the sentence. If clarity is the intended goal, some of them, at least, need to be put back. On the other hand, if the intended goal is to match some "correctness" norm, then it doesn't matter whether it's clear. The issue is taken, which is, as noted, a participial adjective. That identification, however, doesn'...


4

"unending" is the simplest term for a road without end.


4

My guess would be that it is a slight inaccuracy to say that this type of clause reduction can only be done with passives—rather, it can only be done with verbal forms that use be as their auxiliary. Basically the reduction is about removing the subject and verb in a copular clause, leaving the subject complement behind, whether that be a pure adjective or a ...


4

The main verb is copular was with dummy subject there. It is impossible to cast that into the passive voice. something is the complement which has the participle placed that the CGEL calls a bare passive clause. The sentence has one independent clause and that one is not passive. However, it does have a second clause (placed on the table) which is.


4

The verb relate denotes several types of connection between multiple entities: verb [WITH OBJECT] 1.0 Make or show a connection between: the study examines social change within the city and relates it to developments in the country as a whole a supercomputer could relate all those factors 1.1 (be related) Be causally connected: high ...


4

These are verbs heading clauses, which in turn are functioning as the Complements of prepositions. In traditional grammar (where we don't distinguish carefully between what something is and what it is doing), these are called gerunds. This is just because we normally see phrases headed by nouns doing the job of being the Complement of a preposition. So-...


4

I don't know the right way of analysing this, but it seems to me to have to do with grammatical aspect. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston and Pullum) interprets English as having two aspects, progressive and non-progressive. (The perfect is not considered to be an aspect; it's treated as a distinct system for various reasons.) As far ...


4

"The window was broken by John." It doesn't seem simple to me to demonstrate that "broken" in this sentence is not simultaneously a verb and an adjective. Participles Participles are one of the classic areas of dispute about part-of-speech categories. I’m not qualified to give a summary of the overall state of linguistic opinion about this area, but my ...


4

Compare these two sentences: You're gonna hear me roar. -and- You're gonna hear me roaring. The first is far more definite and assertive. It has a defiant, almost challenging, quality to it. I'm going to win! You're not going to stop me! The second is more fluid, extending out into the future toward some indefinite possible stopping point. I'm going to be ...


4

"I hate Jill singing those songs" could only be interpreted as meaning something like "I hate it when Jill sings those songs", "I hate that Jill sings those songs", or ""I hate Jill's singing those songs". I agree with Chris H's answer that "I hate Jill singing those songs" could not practically be interpreted as meaning "I hate Jill when she is singing ...


4

A rescue dog is something quite different from a rescued dog. From Wikipedia: A rescue dog is a dog that has been placed in a new home after being abused, neglected, or abandoned by its previous owner. The term can also apply to dogs that are found as strays, surrendered by owners for a variety of reasons, including relationship breakdowns, moving home ...


4

In English, when you are talking about a place being attended as an institution, we often leave out the article; but the choice of which institutions you can do this with varies according to the variety of English. So in British and American English we say to/in prison and to school (though there is another difference in the preposition: AmE in school, AmE/...


4

Grammatical terms are not always used consistently in different sources. In general, the term noun modifier is usually a broad term, often encompassing adjectives, nouns used to modify other nouns, verbs used as modifiers (usually past or present participles), and even phrases and clauses that modify a noun. Some examples: Adjective: I took the big tire ...


3

You're making this much harder than it really is. The word you are looking for is "endless", used like this: "He traveled what seemed an endless road. It was indeed a long and tiresome road, stretching out before him as though it would never reach its destination"


3

In general(*), if the complement of a verb/preposition is an -ing form, then when coordinating that verb, native speakers will coordinate it with another -ing form. So (A) and (B) have different interpretations: (A) I [prefer...] and then [deepen...] (B) I prefer [ [learning...] and then [deepending...] ] In other words, in (A), it is implied that 'prefer' ...


3

I think part of your difficulty is that you're trying to make your analysis 'worry' about things that traditional grammar worried about but which aren't really relevant to a modern analysis. Remember that in a modern analysis: you are not constrained to the traditional assumption that every grammatical feature must be overtly present (in other words, you ...


3

It as a long road, stretching and unfolding as it went, and it seemed like it would never end. (Or perhaps unfurling?)


3

They are examples of absolute constructions: Absolute construction From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: In linguistics, an absolute construction is a grammatical construction standing apart from a normal or usual syntactical relation with other words or sentence elements. It can be a non-finite clause that is subordinate in form and ...


3

Simplify: Reduce at higher speed to faster Reduce compared to to an Xer than construction Eliminate the move/travel elegant variation Restructure to give parallelism more weight: vehicle in the left lane : ... in the right lane I can't see any vehicle in the left lane traveling faster than those in the right lane.


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