Skip to main content
13 votes

"As pets being welcome, she stayed at the hotel with her dog."

In the sentence about which you are asking, the word being is a present participle, and is used in a manner that is awkward. The subordinating conjunction as normally would introduce a dependent ...
Matthew Rips's user avatar
12 votes

Hear Me Roar Vs Hear Me Roaring?

It's a quote. One of the very first anthems of the women's movement was Helen Reddy's 1970s hit "I Am Woman" (see Wikipedia for the song's history). Its opening lines are I am woman, hear me roar ...
1006a's user avatar
  • 22.9k
11 votes
Accepted

The correct negative form (past participle)

Both ways are grammatical. In some cases, one form will be more idiomatic than another form, but there is no general rule as to which one you should use. All the following sentences are correct: Our ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Is the past participle becoming obsolete? (I have went)

I think this is an example of "recency illusion," which you described very well as the situation where "increasing observation" is caused by "increasing awareness." From one point of view, the past ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.1k
8 votes

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

Yes There are constructions called zeugmas (after Greek ζεῦγμα, 'a yoking') where a word or phrase is intentionally made to apply to two or more others in a sentence despite functioning differently ...
lly's user avatar
  • 10.3k
7 votes

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

How about "splashing is forbidden?" Splashing seems to function as either a noun or a verb. It could be modified by an adverb to fit the verb test: Loudly splashing is forbidden. Or it could ...
RaceYouAnytime's user avatar
7 votes

The reason being

Early examples of the expression from transcripts The phrase "the reason being is that..." appears in Google Books search results going back to the late 1960s—initially in reports of ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 165k
7 votes

"I hate Jill singing those songs." = "I hate Jill when she is singing those songs."?

I would interpret them differently. "I hate Jill singing those songs" implies that you hate her actions (singing) when she sings those songs. Whereas "I hate Jill when she is singing those songs" ...
S.Frogile's user avatar
  • 134
6 votes
Accepted

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

ᴛʟ;ᴅʀ Is it ever possible for a sentence to have a word in it that is simultaneously more than one single part of speech in that sentence, under the same parse and meaning? So, if a ...
John Lawler's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

What is the hidden subject of "making" (particple) in the following sentence?

1: Yakkleman Skin Care has signed a deal with NutriSpark Online Shopping, making them the only retailer with access to our products The "hidden subject" of making is [the fact that] ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
5 votes

"What I'm doing is watching TV." — Why does it have to be the gerund-participle ('watching')?

I don't know the right way of analysing this, but it seems to me to have to do with grammatical aspect. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston and Pullum) interprets English as ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.1k
5 votes

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

Since the same words can be adjectives and adverbs, sentences could be constructed where the word modifies a noun and a verb: She is and runs fast. While others cheat, my children are and play ...
DavePhD's user avatar
  • 10.6k
5 votes

Rescue dogs vs rescued dogs

A rescue dog is something quite different from a rescued dog. From Wikipedia: A rescue dog is a dog that has been placed in a new home after being abused, neglected, or abandoned by its previous ...
Jason Bassford's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is there such a thing as a participle phrase?

[1] Look at the girl dancing on the stage. [2] Look at the dancing girl. [3] They are a happily married couple. [4] The Japanese are now a meat-eating people. As you say, in [1] "dancing on the ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 13.4k
4 votes

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

"The window was broken by John." It doesn't seem simple to me to demonstrate that "broken" in this sentence is not simultaneously a verb and an adjective. Participles Participles are one of the ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

Hear Me Roar Vs Hear Me Roaring?

Compare these two sentences: You're gonna hear me roar. -and- You're gonna hear me roaring. The first is far more definite and assertive. It has a defiant, almost challenging, quality to it. I'm ...
CWill's user avatar
  • 1,438
4 votes

"I hate Jill singing those songs." = "I hate Jill when she is singing those songs."?

"I hate Jill singing those songs" could only be interpreted as meaning something like "I hate it when Jill sings those songs", "I hate that Jill sings those songs", or ""I hate Jill's singing those ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

Gerund or Participle?

I agree with johnlee that "waiting" in this sentence should be classified as a participle, not a gerund, if you are working in a framework that makes that distinction. (Comments by members ...
herisson's user avatar
  • 83.1k
4 votes

"stuck" vs "sticking" vs "stick" - Why is this third sentence weird? Issue of: Participles or Aspects?

Let's clear away the irrelevant complications, shall we? The presenting question is equally clear with these examples: Mary has the photo stuck on her wall. Mary has the photo sticking on her wall. ...
John Lawler's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Why are people leaving out the indefinite article 'a' before seemingly random nouns?

In English, when you are talking about a place being attended as an institution, we often leave out the article; but the choice of which institutions you can do this with varies according to the ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 77.3k
4 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between an adjective and a noun modifier?

Grammatical terms are not always used consistently in different sources. In general, the term noun modifier is usually a broad term, often encompassing adjectives, nouns used to modify other nouns, ...
Athanasius's user avatar
  • 2,393
4 votes
Accepted

Is the gerund and (present) participle form always the same (spelling)?

Are the participle and gerund form of a verb always technically the same and in all tenses (in the sense of spelling) or do deviations exist? Remember that verbs have different participles according ...
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
4 votes

Struggling with participle phrases - adjectival vs adverbial

(1) Turning into the parking lot, the girl could see that lines were already forming. (2) It came to pass that, settling permanently in Paris, he too forgot the child, especially when the Revolution ...
JK2's user avatar
  • 6,623
4 votes

adjective vs adverb for a gerund

"Informally" is correct, as your example with "occasionally observing" shows. Here "noting" is a gerund, not a verbal noun. Whereas verbal nouns are modified by ...
alphabet's user avatar
  • 19.1k
4 votes

The correct negative form (past participle)

Where there is the negated adjective, it is usually the idiomatic choice: 1 We complained but as usual our voices went unheard. 1' *We complained but as usual our voices went not heard. (went ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
3 votes

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

From my experience, it strikes me that words which would ordinarily be (or be like) two parts of speech have been separated into different categories, thus creating "new" parts of speech. If I'm not ...
Hanna's user avatar
  • 89
3 votes

How many parts of speech can a word be at the same time?

To be really pedantic, the definition of a verb (for instance) is different from the definition of a noun, even if the same word is used, so at one level your intuition is correct. As a practical ...
WhatRoughBeast's user avatar
3 votes

Why is "banging his nose" possible but "answering the phone'' not possible?

Both are grammatical. He banged his nose while he ran into the wall. So you can say "He ran into the wall, banging his nose." If he answered the phone while he got out of bed you can say "He ...
GEdgar's user avatar
  • 25.4k
3 votes

"I hate Jill singing those songs." = "I hate Jill when she is singing those songs."?

In typical use, you can rule out this interpretation. Reading Jill singing those songs as a noun phrase is much more natural than reading it as Jill (when she is) singing those songs. On reading or ...
Chris H's user avatar
  • 21.8k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible