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See : Greek - > deleterious (aka poisonous, harmful to health)


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I'm glad for you curiosity, but your title could use some more context. The book that is quoted would have done better to say that the word 'above' is etymologically equivalent to 'on + (by + up)'. I find the way he has it too suggestive, if not downright misleading (and likely leading the the poster's inquiry) (the quote being "So in a sense, above ...


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According to the following source, the h was lost because of its unemphasized position: The h- was lost due to being in an unemphasized position, as in modern speech the h- in "give it to him," "ask her," is heard only "in the careful speech of the partially educated" [Weekley, Ernest, An Etymological Dictionary of Modern ...


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I have read that until the time of grammarian guru, Quintilian ( 1st century AD.) "c" and "k" were both used in Latin. However, Quintilian put it about that "k" was not to be used, only "c". Therefore, the Romance languages, descended from Latin, hardly ever use 'k". High German was not really developed until ...


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Some readers may take starting a sentence with a coordinating conjunction as a sign of informality or stylistic infelicity. But it is fine grammatically, particularly when coordinating with the previous sentence. For the MLA Style Center suggests it is a stylistic preference rather than a point of grammar, giving these examples: He started a sentence with a ...


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