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106

There are 168 hours in a week (7 x 24). Thus 16.8 hours is a tenth of a week. 16.8 hours is 16 and 8/10 hours which is exactly 16 hours and 48 minutes. As a night-shift worker myself, working in an industry (Security) which offers 24/7/365 services, I am aware that some 24 hour payment systems work on dividing up the week into sections and one way of doing ...


82

You can refer to this symbol as a radix point no matter what the base is. In computer science and mathematics, the word radix can mean the same thing as base or root. The contemporary meaning derives from earlier meanings referring literally to the "roots" of plants, and later to roots in a mathematical sense and other senses. The OED provides this ...


79

I seem to remember the old askoxford.com site said either was acceptable: CDs and CD's. But now the replacement Oxford Dictionaries Online firmly suggests to avoid the apostrophe except in a few special cases: Apostrophes and plural forms The general rule is that you should not use an apostrophe to form the plurals of nouns, abbreviations, or ...


79

I think what they are actually saying in sports is "he won by 5 hundredths of a second", meaning 5 one-hundredths of a second, not one five-hundredth of a second. You have to listen carefully sometimes to hear the 's' at the end.


73

If your argument was that thousands means 2000+, then you could show your boyfriend the following dictionaries, which define thousands in your favour: merriam-webster freedictionary collins Do not show him the following dictionaries, which define thousands in his favour: oxford dictionary.com cambridge I'd say opinion is well and truly divided.


59

The implication is that the martini is before sex and the cigarette after.


54

It's an ordinal indicator: In written languages, an ordinal indicator is a letter, or group of letters, following a numeral denoting that it is an ordinal number, rather than a cardinal number. Historically these letters were "elevated terminals", that is to say the last few letters of the full word denoting the ordinal form of the number displayed as a ...


47

16.8 is 16 plus 8/10. As I come from England, my first instinct on seeing a "." is that it's a decimal separator. Being from Poland, I assume you would have had the same instinct had it been written "16,8", rather than expecting the punctuation to be a time separator. I suspect you have seen this in an invoice for time spent by a company's employees working ...


46

The reason English has three different words for those is because English has three different words for 1, 2, and 3. It’s like why we have three different words for sixth, eighth, and twelfth: there’s a suffix here used with regular numbers. The difference is that instead of ‑th for ordinals, it’s ‑ce for adverbials, and you just aren't recognizing that ‑...


41

Assuming you mean 10-99 inclusive, the phrase you want is "two-digit number".


40

As a software developer, here are a few phrases that I would prefer: numéro of the current software process Version of the current software process. A version number is implicitly part of a version, it is what identifies one version from another. If you are talking about software versions specifically; then this is the best option. ID/Identifier of the ...


37

You probably don't want to do it at all. Noninteger numbers are best written in their decimal form (1.5, 5.0). If they can be expressed as simple fractions, you can do that instead: “one and a half” for 1.5. If you absolutely want to write it out, then you'll have to do it the way they are spelt: “one point five”, “five point zero”. You can use oh instead ...


36

Putting the ones place before the tens place was formerly the primary way to discuss two-digit numbers like twenty-two. The Oxford English Dictionary, under "twenty, adj. and n.," lists the Old English translation of his Histories: c893 tr. Orosius Hist. vi. ii. 256 Þara twa & twentigra monna þe he him to fultume hæfde acoren. In Early Modern ...


35

Mathematicians do use this form for bigger numbers. The Wikipedia article Heptadecagon currently contains the phrase "a regular 51-gon, 85-gon or 255-gon and any regular n-gon with 2h times as many sides". And in that context, you may find mathematicians using the form for smaller numbers: in an article about polygons of different sizes, I would not be ...


34

They are called tally marks. Tally marks, or hash marks, are a unary numeral system. They are a form of numeral used for counting. They allow updating written intermediate results without erasing or discarding anything written down. However, because of the length of large numbers, tallies are not commonly used for static text.


31

The Chicago Manual of Style says: Capital letters used as words, numerals used as nouns, and abbreviations usually form the plural by adding s. To aid comprehension, lowercase letters form the plural with an apostrophe and an s. The lowercase letter exception presumably exists because omitting the apostrophe can make the sentence much harder to understand (...


31

In computing circles, we often refer to numbers like 10K, 24M, 120G as being human-readable or humanized numbers. This is often in the context of byte counts, which can get notoriously unwieldy with modern storage sizes (e.g. saying I have 323416563175 bytes free on my computer), though I have seen it applied to other contexts as well. For example, the man ...


31

a is replacing one. That is, in the following pairings, both options are legitimate: I saw one hundred [and] forty-seven birds today.1 I saw a hundred [and] forty-seven birds today.1 I earned one million dollars. I earned a million dollars. Preferences for one or the other may vary. To me, using one sounds more precise than a, so that would ...


30

It depends on whether two-thirds (or any similar proportion) is regarded as a measure of amount or of number. In (1), the emphasis is likely to be on the amount of pizza eaten, and not on the number of individual thirds, so (b) would be appropriate. In contrast, in (2) the emphasis is on the number of visitors who were men, so plural concord, as in (a), is ...


29

The problem is that English uses two different kinds of adjectives to mean "first, second, etc". The ones in -ary without the -n- come from the Latin ordinals, "first, second, etc."; but they are different after 3. Primus — primary "first" Secundus — secondary "second" Tertius — tertiary Quartus — *quartary Quintus — *quintary ... The ...


29

Palindrome /…/ noun a word, phrase, or sequence that reads the same backward as forward This excerpt is from the Oxford Dictionary of English, third edition, which was edited by Angus Stevenson. In the definition, a sequence refers to number chains. If you didn't want to be completely on the nose about it, you could work in the phrase mirror image ...


28

1971 - Non-Money Related Sorry, @Mary-LouA, but I've got one from a year before your 1972 citation, and it's not monetary. This also fits with the OP's 1974 recollections involving speed and its measurement. Here's an example of someone using "a buck" to mean 100 miles per hour. It's from May or June 1971. The reference is the Arlington High School ...


26

"One hundred and thirty-five" is perfectly correct, although the "and" tends to be removed in American English. It makes sense mathematically, since "and" is synonymous with "plus" — two apples and three apples makes five apples. One hundred, and thirty-five, makes 135. The "and" is particularly useful when articulating a series of numbers. "One hundred one,...


26

Well, you have two options: Option 1: re-arrange your sentence or invent some spurious phrase to put after the decimal so that it looks less obvious; Option 2: don't worry about it and just have a cup of tea.


26

It doesn't matter how many different authorities/style guides are cited - usage in this area has never been fixed, so it doesn't mean much to suggest the "rule has changed over time". The use of apostrophes has always been less common, but it's been around at least a century (there, for example, the 1700's). It's also worth noting that (particularly in ...


25

How a car manufacturer names its models is more of a marketing preference than anything, but in general you'll find that the Porche model is the norm. Ask any schoolchild to read aloud the number "911" and you'll get "nine hundred and eleven", not "nine one one". The telephone number 9-1-1 was, as you speculated, spelled out specifically to prevent people -...


24

It depends. Normally, it's easier to understand numbers when presented in a familiar way. Dates are usually presented in groups of two: nineteen eightyfour Commonly-used numbers are sometimes abbreviated: one-twenty-eight, two-fifty-six numbers after decimals are usually said singly: three point one four regular numbers are almost never abbreviated: two ...


23

The numerals with endings are merely abbreviations for the words written out as text. When in doubt, write the word out. Thirty-first becomes 31st, eleventh 11th, forty-second 42nd, fiftieth 50th, and so on.


23

I don't believe there is a specific term which applies only to numbers, but we can say such numbers are abbreviated. For example, the University of North Carolina says of such numeric suffixes: K: an informal abbreviation for one thousand used in expressions where the unit is understood, such as "10K run" (10 kilometers) or "700K disk" (700 kilobytes or ...


22

It's called the additive inverse. In a less technical context, you could just call them negatives of each other. Similarly, 5 and 1/5 are multiplicative inverses.


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