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As an unofficial position, in the UK, the person would be described as "the landlord's agent" if he receives some sort of reward for his action (e.g. money or a reduced rent, etc.) or, if he did not, it would be phrased "Mr Smith was acting as the landlord's agent" - hence he is an agent - but the term needs a description. The official occupation is "...


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Heinous Which means wicked or deplorable. Heinous - of a person or wrongful act, especially a crime) utterly odious or wicked. "a battery of heinous crimes" From Middle French ‘haine’ meaning ‘hate’. ‘A heinous dictator’ https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heinous


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well, it really depends upon what you are pointing out. The world has so many examples of dictators. President Xi is the most powerful ever, but clearly the world would agree that Hitler was worse. Idi Amin was vile, yet the Lees of Singapore are dictators but it is a beautiful place with happy people. The word you are looking for is not a descriptor or ...


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An Australian here, three years late. We were taught, at least up until the 1960's, that medsen was what you studied, medicine was what you swallowed. However, very few Australians use the pronunciation medsen. Just the evolution of the language - the upper-classes not dominating university, a multiracial society with English now a second language ...


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He was actually translating "the Bronx job" (which to Italian back to English will translate as "the job of Bronx"), which is a euphemism for a mafia hit (killing).


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Ok. I figured it out. They’re nearly identical when used in that sentence but will is future tense where must is logically to happen whenever . Nearly the same meaning in this sentence just present vs future.


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I think it is just a personal expression as suggested in the following article from the Italian newspaper “Corriere della Sera”. Note that the real words are “Fazz ‘a job d’o Bronx” a mix of a southern italian dialect and English. The sense of his (Commisso) words probably is: You make fun of me because I don’t speak Italian very well, but if you want ...


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As has been said - in most contexts, "will" indicates a prediction: "You will pay for your sins" = "At some future time, you will pay for your sins" The speaker does not explain how or when this will happen. Must carries an obligation and also usually refers to something that should be done now or in a very short time: "You must pay for your sins"-> "You ...


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