14 votes

What does TOOLER mean in Rugby school slang?

William Parker Brooke, Rupert’s father became Tutor at Rugby’s School Field House a fortnight after marrying Ruth Mary Cotterill in December 1879. According to the biography Rupert Brooke: Life, Death ...
bookmanu's user avatar
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8 votes
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In a title like "Peter the Great", what is the name for the "the Great" part?

epithet This is from Merriam-Webster Did You Know? Nowadays, "epithet" is usually used negatively, with the meaning "a derogatory word or phrase," but it wasn't always that way. "Epithet" ...
GEdgar's user avatar
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7 votes
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Is there a synonym for nickname including '-onym'?

Hypocoronym It appears that I may have gone to EL&U too quickly; upon further inspection of a list of '-onym' words I found Hypocoronym: A colloquial, usually unofficial, name of an entity;...
BladorthinTheGrey's user avatar
7 votes
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How common are hypocorisms ending with "s" in female names? (Babs, Bess, Becks...)

This is the suffix ‑s, of which the paywalled OED says: A shortened form of the hypocoristic diminutive suffix ‑sy suffix², added to the same classes of words, as Babs, Toots; ducks (see duck n.¹ 3c),...
tchrist's user avatar
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5 votes

Is it suitable to use my native name 'Dong' in English environment in account of its special meaning in English?

Speaking for the USA only, both the names "Dick" and "Dong" are also slang words for penis. Nonetheless, many people such as former vice president Dick Cheney go by the name "Dick". "Dong" on the ...
DavePhD's user avatar
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5 votes
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What can be an affectionate name for a car?

I would nominate "Baby" Sure, my [Baby] will take you there in no time.
D3v's user avatar
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5 votes

Why do some nicknames have no apparent relation with their original counterparts?

While @Josh's answer is good and provides quite a lot of historical background for some of the specific nicknames, it doesn't completely address why, in general, names are truncated: the nicknames you'...
Aleksandr Hovhannisyan's user avatar
5 votes
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Is there a reason that "Righty" isn't a good nickname?

Probably it's because more people are right handed and it used to be expected that everyone should use their right hand as if it were dominant. So, a person who was a "righty" was not special, ...
EL_DON's user avatar
  • 348
4 votes

Is there a synonym for nickname including '-onym'?

Not exactly the same as "nickname", a "pseudonym" is a fictitious name used by an author to conceal his or her identity. It's also called a "pen name" pseudonym - "a fictitious name adopted, esp by ...
Centaurus's user avatar
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4 votes

Is there a synonym for nickname including '-onym'?

It's complicated. The short answer is that there is none. There is no word ending in '-onym' that is equivalent to nickname. But there are related terms that capture what 'nickname' captures. A ...
Mitch's user avatar
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4 votes

Why is it that John Chrysostom is almost never referred to as "John Golden Mouth" in English?

Catholic Online lists more than 200 saints named John, although a dozen or so are duplicate entries. Some of these saints, including St. John Chrysostom ("St. John the Golden Mouthed"), are ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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4 votes

Looking for origins of "craney-crow"

Joel Chandler Harris, the author/compiler/reteller of the Uncle Remus stories, was born in 1848. But by the time he was six years old, published mentions of the term "craney crow" had ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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4 votes

Commas and nicknames

Placing commas on either side of the nickname marks it clearly as a non-restrictive appositive. In short, it's clear that "darling" is a re-statement of "Rose" which does not limit or identify Rose ...
Rob's user avatar
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4 votes

Looking for an appropriate English name to replace my Chinese name

I don’t know what your Chi­nese name is, whether us­ing Chi­nese char­ac­ters or in the Pinyin al­pha­bet that works bet­ter for Western read­ers, but you need to know some­thing very im­por­tant ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 134k
3 votes
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Commodore Blimp

As The Photon suggests, this is almost certainly a reference to the character 'Colonel Blimp' invented by the cartoonist David Low. He was a pompous elderly army officer who expressed old-fashioned ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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3 votes

Is there a term for someone who barely moves their arms whilst walking?

This question brought to mind a toy we had when I was a kid. It was made popular on the TV show "Romper Room" Plastic cylinders (like small coffee cans) with loops of cord attached - and you'd stand ...
Oldbag's user avatar
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3 votes

Are there any poetic names for a "rainbow"

showery prism,triumphal arch,lovely Iris are all candidate phrases that may be found in the poems of James Thomson and Thomas Campbell. https://interestingliterature.com/2019/10/9-of-the-best-poems-...
Anton's user avatar
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3 votes

Capitalization rules for nicknames and name-replacing honorifics

According to this blog... yes, guidance differs. "Those of you looking for hard and fast rules on this issue are doomed to disappointment." But let's agree, for starters, that it all hinges ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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3 votes
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2-letter abbreviation for the name Montgomery

Ancestry.co.uk gives an etymology: English, Scottish, and northern Irish (of Norman origin): habitational name from a place in Calvados, France, so named from Old French mont ‘hill’ + a Germanic ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
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2 votes

What can be an affectionate name for a car?

I'd guess the most common name for a car is Betsy (that's a link to dozens of written instances of "car named Betsy" in Google Books). I never named any of my cars, but I've known a couple of people ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

Why did James Harrington nickname Oliver Cromwell "Lord Achon"

According to the Wikipedia entry for this book, Harrington's Commonwealth of Oceana was first published in in 1656. An examination of the contents of the 1656 edition of the book, discoverable with a ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
2 votes

Quotation marks for nicknames

This is a question of style, so the best I can do is record what some style manuals say about it, directly or indirectly. Having said that, all but one manual I consulted would recommend that you use ...
linguisticturn's user avatar
2 votes

Is there a term for nicknames which are inserted between first and last names?

The structure, would probably be a figure of interruption. Probably parembole (or paremptosis, which seems to have the same meaning), but maybe also parenthesis. This is what Silva Rhetoricae website ...
A.Mundell's user avatar
2 votes

Is there a term for nicknames which are inserted between first and last names?

Is there a term for nicknames which are inserted between first and last names? embedded nickname But a flat structure cannot be nested immediately under another flat structure. For example, the ...
DjinTonic's user avatar
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2 votes
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Derogatory name for Average Joe type

Probably Smart Aleck fits your context: an obnoxiously conceited and self-assertive person with pretensions to smartness or cleverness. (M-W)
user 66974's user avatar
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2 votes

What does TOOLER mean in Rugby school slang?

It means he played with his genitals (i.e. his tool) a lot. Whether he actually did or not is a different matter, but that's what the insult means. Source... I'm an alumnus of a similarly eccentric ...
ScottishTapWater's user avatar
1 vote

Race question for curiosity purposes

I think you can use the popular catch all self-identify which means: To believe or assert that one belongs to a certain group or class (American Heritage Dictionary) There is a person who "self-...
Pam's user avatar
  • 7,220
1 vote

Usage of "[Name] of [Company]"

Yes, this is a valid way to refer to a person. However, it implies that the company name in question is sufficiently well-known, and is also relevant to establishing their credentials for the topic ...
Steve Shipway's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

articles before nicknames

Short answer: Nicknames with "the" are typically titles and honorifics not intended for direct addressly the person so named. Without "the", the nickname is often, but not always, intended to replace ...
Smartybartfast's user avatar

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