85

Resistentialism Resistentialism is a jocular theory to describe "seemingly spiteful behavior manifested by inanimate objects", where objects that cause problems (like lost keys or a runaway bouncy ball) are said to exhibit a high degree of malice toward humans.


46

Perhaps icon would do the trick? i·con Also i·kon (ī′kŏn′) a. An image; a representation. b. A representation or picture of a sacred or sanctified Christian personage, traditionally used and venerated in the Eastern Church. An important and enduring symbol etc. Definition taken from theFreeDictionary.com There are quite a few definitions listed here ...


43

Epiphany has nothing to do with phones—it is etymologically an ‘out-showing’ or manifestation, and until recently was used primarily for the manifestation of a divine being: most often, as in the Feast of the Epiphany, the manifestation of Christ to the world at large. The modern sense derives primarily from the work of James Joyce (though he had ...


41

Whateverize is always a word Yes, of course versionize is a “real word” — and no disparaging remarks about its parentage should be made in polite company. This is because ‑ize is a productive suffix in English that’s used to produce a new verb from various nouns and adjectives. That means that any word derived by combining an existing one of those using ‑...


40

I would say no, they are not the same. As Ian says, there are many ways to compress a file or set of files; Zip is only one of them. It would be like using "banana" to mean any kind of fruit, or "Ford" to mean any kind of car. I just had a frustrating conversation with my daughter the other day where she asked if I had any software to unzip a file. I told ...


38

People have created new gender-neutral pronouns. (A good list of currently used ones can be found here.) Furthermore, the move to create gender-neutral pronouns in English is quite old. However, none of these pronouns were ever very successful. Few people are even aware they exist. Currently, these new pronouns are usually confined to the transgender ...


36

It's too soon to tell for sure... This is an unprecedented situation where a head of state's typo became a widely mocked online meme. Essentially, Trump coined a new word and then openly challenged the public to guess what it meant in a follow-up tweet. A word like this, that becomes famous in a single day, could disappear and remain meaningless, or it ...


35

Rhumatis is almost certainly a colloquialism for rheumatism. In the era that Uncle Tom's Cabin was written, rheumatism was a catch-all term for what modern medicine recognizes as distinct conditions and disorders of the joints and muscles. It is no longer in professional or academic use because, like ague, grippe, catarrh, and so on, the causes and ...


34

I have some suggestions. The first, 'hierogram', is not a neologism, and on the whole strikes me as the best option: hierogram, n. A sacred symbol; ... (lit. and fig.). ["hierogram, n.". OED Online. December 2015. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/86816?redirectedFrom=hierogram (accessed March 04, 2016).] The OED Online ...


30

There is already a word for converting something to English: Anglicization /Anglicisation (AmE/BrE) 1 : to make English in quality or characteristics 2 : to adapt (a foreign word, name, or phrase) to English usage: as a : to alter to a characteristic English form, sound, or spelling b : to convert (a name) to its English equivalent <anglicize Juan ...


30

I love the word gamify. Before that we used to have to use the set phrase, "Turn it into a game". My mom would say, "Okay kids. Let's turn it into a game." Then she would gamify our chores with little tiles for points and score cards for the week, with minimum number of tiles to earn for a popsicle, etc. Your example sentence: Our parents and ...


27

Disillusion (v.): to make someone realize that something which they thought was true or good is not really true or good: I hate to disillusion you, but I don't think she's coming back. Disenchantment (n.) [uncountable]: disappointment with someone or something, and no longer believing that they are good: Voters expressed growing disenchantment ...


27

So, the question is and the answer is


24

It's most likely to be a typo for coverage given the context, though by most metrics there are plenty of more likely typos. Based on an analysis of error distances, and taking into account QWERTY keyboard layouts, the rather obvious coffee comes out top. Tweeting at midnight, does that mean too much or too little? But coverage is the highest-ranking word ...


22

I believe the word you're looking for is Listicle: In journalism and blogging, a listicle is a short-form of writing that uses a list as its thematic structure, but is fleshed out with sufficient copy to be published as an article. A typical listicle will prominently feature a cardinal number in its title, such as "10 Ways to Warm Up Your Bedroom in ...


22

In physical sciences, an alternate fact is a true statement that, while appearing to contradict another fact, actually illuminates the subject to greater depth. For example, is light a particle or a wave? In political debate, an alternative fact is a statement that, although demonstrably false, is treated as a tribal talisman and acted on as ...


21

The person is a bore. I can't think of a type of bore specific to travel but if you would accept a hyphenated one I suggest travel-bore, which I have occasionally heard used.


20

Yes, people say zipped to mean compressed the same way they say googled to mean searched or hoovered to mean vacuumed. The ZIP file format dates back to 1989.


20

Telecommute includes commute by way of analogy, just like the presence in telepresence, the desk in a virtual desktop and arguably, the friendship of a facebook friend. That is, although there is no commuting in the traditional sense, some of the abstract properties still hold. For example, the person is considered to be ‘at work’, with deliverables and ...


19

Mostly, because they already have singular they. It's been in the language since the 14th century. Prior to that, there was generic he, which continued to also be used until the 20th century and is still found. There are also the inclusive doubles "he/she" and "s/he" ("inclusive" though not as inclusive as we might want, on which more below). The earliest ...


19

It’s a portmanteau. When telecommuting you are commuting via the telecommunications network. All your "travel" is done by the internet. No internet, no work (cf no train, no work). You’re right in that the word "telecommuting" doesn’t literally mean what it means, but it’s much nicer to say than "telecommunications commuting".


18

In short, it means centuries-old or age-old. It's formed from the prefix pluri and the word secular. Both from Merriam-Webster. pluri-: : many : having or being more than one : MULTI- // pluriaxial [having more than one axis] // plurilocular [divided into chambers] secular: 3 a : occurring once in an age or a century 3 b : existing or ...


17

This kind of user is called an ask-and-run. It is even mentioned on Meta Stack Overflow: Dealing with “ask-and-run” questioners Bonus: If we follow the same pattern, we can also come up with a specific term ask-and-idle for users who post a question but stay idle (but don't disappear/leave) without accepting an answer, commenting, replying to people, etc. ...


17

In the UK, the term "Brownie points" had pretty much the same meaning since the 1960s and was quite widely used. I always assumed the origin was from the "points and badges" awards in the junior division (Brownies) of the Girl Guide movement. Wikipedia has some alternative etymological conjectures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brownie_points (But it doesn'...


17

Bertrand Russell in his introduction to the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus says that facts are what make propositions true. Suppose we have a fact A and that the proposition "A is true" is true and we have an alternative fact B and "B is true" is also true. In itself this is not a problem and so there can be alternative facts. For example if A is "I own a ...


17

Its earliest written usage appears to be from a glossary of terms published by the NY Times magazine in 1962, implying that its usage was by then already somewhat established and that its original usage probably dates a few years earlier: Woke follows a long history of words and phrases that relate the gaining of knowledge to sleep and/or sight. ...


16

(update) It was a typo Donald Trump has an unfortunate history of typos and misspellings in his tweets: From the original source cited by the OP, posted 31 May 2017, come the following The Washington Post quotes Trump targets ‘negative press covfefe’ in garbled midnight tweet that becomes worldwide joke At 12:06 a.m. Eastern time Wednesday, ...


14

In her new book, A World without "Whom" — The Essential Guide to Language in the BuzzFeed Age (Bloomsbury USA, 2017), Emmy J. Favilla writes this about the term woke (pp. 204-206): ...one byproduct of communication in the digital era is that phrases once circulated primarily within a particular community or group often find themselves gliding ...


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