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70 votes
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Why is a song's radio edit called a ‘7" version’?

When I was growing up in the '60s, in Australia, there were three common formats of vinyl record available. My comments below are based on my own experience and purchases of records from major bands ...
jostle's user avatar
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46 votes
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Precise word to differentiate "major" and "minor" in music

It's called a tonality. Every tonality has its own special group of notes called a scale. The scale is a specific arrangement of notes. The arrangement of these notes is how we're able to identify ...
samgak's user avatar
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38 votes

Why is a song's radio edit called a ‘7" version’?

A "7 inch single" was a 7 inch diameter vinyl record, which ran at 45 rpm, with a single song on each side; the main 'A' side the 'B' side which normally had a less popular song.
James's user avatar
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31 votes

Precise word to differentiate "major" and "minor" in music

It's "mode." Major and minor are two modes, others are Phrygian (e.g., Symphony of Psalms mvmt I), myxolidian and others. "Tonality" is an historically valid description, it's just not what's needed ...
The_300's user avatar
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29 votes

What does "autolyco-sentimental" mean?

Autolyco- From the Greek autolycus, meaning "the wolf itself" (i.e. savage, without sentiment). Wikipedia: Autolycus So, autolyco-sentimental is, perhaps, an oxymoron meaning both with and without ...
Mick's user avatar
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27 votes

Why is a song's radio edit called a ‘7" version’?

I think the point being missed in the otherwise good answers so far comes from a later distinction. Yes, the 'seven inch' was the format of a 'pop single', potentially though not necessarily ...
Tetsujin's user avatar
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20 votes
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What do you call all the pieces of a song minus the lyrics

Instrumentals — TFD plural noun of instrumental It's very commonly used to refer to music (minus the lyrics) noun Music A composition for one or more instruments, usually without vocal accompaniment. ...
NVZ's user avatar
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18 votes
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What term is used for the type of music that evokes a strong picture?

Music that is intended to evoke a picture in the listener's mind is termed program(me) music. Rodeo is certainly this. I'm not familiar with the symphony you mention, so I don't know whether the ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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18 votes

What term is used for the type of music that evokes a strong picture?

Funnily enough… evocative. OED: adj. Bringing strong images, memories, or feelings to mind. Cambridge: making you remember or imagine something pleasant: evocative music a sound ...
Lightness Races in Orbit's user avatar
17 votes
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How can I describe "people beat with their feet according to music rhythm" in English?

A common expression with your meaning is foot-tapping which is defined as [noun] A rhythmic tapping of the foot, especially in time to music [adjective] foot-tapping [...] (music) Having an insistent ...
English Student's user avatar
12 votes
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What does "autolyco-sentimental" mean?

The quote is not Berlioz but from Wagner’s book-length essay “Oper und Drama” (Opera and Drama). Wagner wrote it in 1851, and it was published the following year in Leipzig. Your text is just one ...
tchrist's user avatar
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11 votes

Precise word to differentiate "major" and "minor" in music

Normally you would say: "The composition is in a minor key". In theory you could say "The composition's key is minor", but this is not idiomatic and sounds clumsy.
fdb's user avatar
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10 votes

What do you call all the pieces of a song minus the lyrics

From both the legal and writing process standpoints, the components that make up a song (by "song" I mean a musical piece that includes vocals, and may (often) include other musical instruments that ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
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9 votes

Precise word to differentiate "major" and "minor" in music

I believe the word is Key. Although it includes more than just major or minor, it also includes the pitch, such as C minor, D minor, which are different keys and are usually specified together with ...
Curiosity's user avatar
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8 votes

Precise word to differentiate "major" and "minor" in music

Since the question asks for precision, I think the answer really depends on the level of precision needed for the descriptive task at hand. For the context of a whole composition, I agree with ...
luser droog's user avatar
7 votes
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What is the name of this keyboard music instrument?

The instrument is a Vox Continental combo organ, a popular instrument for bands that toured. According to Wikipedia: The Vox Continental is a transistor-based combo organ that was introduced in ...
Kristina Lopez's user avatar
7 votes
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A word for an instrumental melody which copies the vocal part?

I usually associate “an instrumental reprise” with an instrumental version of an entire song that was originally written with vocals, like the instrumental version of the Eagles' Wasted Time discussed ...
Papa Poule's user avatar
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6 votes

A word for an instrumental melody which copies the vocal part?

While it's not a single word, sometimes this is referred to as "restating the melody." The section itself would still be called a solo, if one player is featured, or an instrumental break, if it's an ...
johncip's user avatar
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6 votes

What do you call all the pieces of a song minus the lyrics

I'd go for 'music'. Bing defines a 'song' as: a short poem or other set of words set to music or meant to be sung. The Free Dictionary describes a song as: a piece of music, usually employing ...
JMP's user avatar
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6 votes

Term that describes the technique in which an artist repeat lyrics from their previous work

I don't know a musical term but I've got a close one. See rehash, defined by Oxford dictionary as: A reuse of old ideas or material without significant change or improvement. Also look up basic ...
vickyace's user avatar
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6 votes

Why is a song's radio edit called a ‘7" version’?

More typographically precise would be to write 7″ (using a double prime mark) instead of 7" (using a generic double quotation mark). The OP's initial speculation about 7″ possibly meaning seven ...
Mike Brown's user avatar
6 votes

Origin of “ish kabibble” as an interjection i.e. 'What, me worry?'

A lot of words that have a /ʃ/ at the start or phrases that use 'ish' (/ɪʃ/) (like Joe Schmoe or ish kabibble) come from people mocking Yiddish. Yiddish (for a while and I think still currently) was ...
Curtis Sheppard's user avatar
5 votes
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Term that describes the technique in which an artist repeat lyrics from their previous work

Depending on the context or connotation you have in mind, I would say that the artist is either borrowing material from earlier work (or even work from other artists), assuming the connotation is ...
Tasos Papastylianou's user avatar
5 votes
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When and where did "clam" come to mean a missed note in a musical performance?

The earliest coverage of clam in the sense of "mistake or misplayed musical note" that I've been able to find is in Harold Wentwoth & Stuart Flexner, Dictionary of American Slang, first ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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5 votes

Origin of “ish kabibble” as an interjection i.e. 'What, me worry?'

Leo Rosten, Hooray for Yiddish! (1982) offers this account of ish kabibble: ish kabibble Derivation: unknown; possibly a corruption of the Yiddish nit gefidlt (or nisht gefidlt). 1. I should care. 2. ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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4 votes
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What adjective can I use for progressively layered music?

When instruments enter one at a time, their entrances are described as staggered. music.stackexchange.com
lauir's user avatar
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4 votes

A word for an instrumental melody which copies the vocal part?

The word you are looking for is a musical lead. Typically it is because that part will play at the same time as the vocals "lead"ing them. However, it qualifies regardless of the order they are in the ...
EvSunWoodard's user avatar
4 votes

What word describes a musical instrument's native character?

How about "Disposition?" https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/disposition The tendency of something to act in a certain manner under given circumstances The word is more flexible than "...
RaceYouAnytime's user avatar
4 votes

What is the origin of the music term 'grace note'?

Interestingly, the OED gives its first attestation of "grace note" in the mid-1700s, but the word "grace" by itself appears as early as 1657, likely the citation that Etymonline was referring to. ...
RaceYouAnytime's user avatar

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