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If you find material in document A that quotes document B, you must reference both documents in your cites. The rationale for this is that selecting what's important and relevant is work and you must give credit for that work. From the Yale College Writing Centre: If the source you’re reading quotes another text, and you want to use that quoted material ...


6

Eh, this is tricky. MLA doesn't have an official style for citing forums, likely because they wouldn't qualify it as valid source material for academic purposes. Oddly, though, they do have a citation recommendation for Tweets (but I imagine that's because Twitter is quickly becoming a news source). I would try the following: Full name (username). Post ...


3

The MLA Handbook (8th ed.) 1.2 Titles of Sources (emphasis mine): Whenever you use the title of a source in your writing, take the title from an authoritative location in the work, not, for example, from the cover or top of a page. Copy the title without reproducing any unusual typography, such as special capitalization or lowercasing of all letters. In ...


3

With an electronic source, the purpose of providing "Date Accessed" is to avoid confusion in articles that might be edited in an ongoing fashion. As long as you provide the date you accessed the article, as well as the original publication date, you should be adhering to MLA rules. So in your case, I would cite the publication date as April 10th ...


2

Library.Cornell.edu has a substantial amount of different types of citations along with examples, all on a single webpage. Purdue OWL also several different MLA citations for various source formats, but they are separated across multiple pages.


2

Citation protocols vary according to different house styles, but the key point is that they should make it easy for the reader to track down any source on which you rely, whilst not, at the same time, impeding the reader’s flow with excessive lists of names and dates. It’s impossible to say precisely how these principles play out in your case, without ...


2

1 Dewey 1983, 173 (citing Louie 1894, 334) 2 Huey 2012, 227 (citing ibid., 345) This is impossible, because it leaves it unclear whether ibid refers to Louie 1894 or Dewey 1983. You need: 2 Huey 2012, 227 (citing Louie 1894, 345) But you are better served by omitting ibid and op cit and the like altogether. The purpose of documentation is to make it ...


2

Yes, it means either enter the author's last name, if he's a human being, or enter the legal name of the company if it's a corporation. When a corporation or other group whose individual members are not named on the title page has authored a text, you would cite the source as follows: Alan Guttmacher Institute. State Legislative Record: 1988 ...


2

According to MLA guidelines: "Use single quotation marks to enclose quotes within another quotation." Thus: "despite the universal desire to return to 'normal,' things changed"


2

Your example "Japanese singer Kyu Sakamoto (坂本 九 )" is quite good. You could try to write your essay similarly: "Mikhail Gorbachev initiated the political reforms of 'restructuring' or 'perestroika' (перестройка)" - and use original word only once (for the first mentioning). The same way is used in Russian.


2

In the current MLA style guide, there is no guidance for multiple authors on the title page. I would suggest following a similar format to the citation style, like this: John Smith and Kayla Ellsworth Professor Adam Houser 3 December 2015 And also using the same style as citations in the header: Smith and Ellsworth 1 But this is just a ...


2

If by 'formal' you mean that your essay will be academically assessed or published, then it would be inappropriate to include a spoiler warning. That would literally make your piece look amateurish. Spoiler warnings are suitably considerate in the perfectly legitimate realm where enthusiasts discuss a text and people primarily hope to enjoy the plot. When ...


2

Section 11.11 of The Chicago Manual of Style 15th edition describes two styles of indicating quotations. One is the run-in quotations that are integrated into the text, and the other is quotations that are set off as block quotations, or extracts. Block Quotations are permitted in A.P.A., M.L.A. and presumably most other styles too, although the exact rules ...


2

MLA's style guide answers this directly: Do not use two question marks. Use only the question mark contained in the quotation: Which Shakespeare character asked, “Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand?” But if the sentence includes a parenthetical citation, place the question mark after the citation: How would you respond to ...


2

I was wondering whether a dash should be written in MLA as two keyboard "minus signs" aka hyphens (--) or use the actual special character for a dash, typed on Mac with alt + minus sign/hyphen (–). A dash should be written as an actual dash, but the usage of two hyphens to approximate it goes back to the typewriter era and is so common that has its own ...


2

From the MLA Handbook (8th ed.): 1.2 Titles of Sources Whenever you use the title of a source in your writing, take the title from an authoritative location in the work, not, for example, from the cover or the top of the page. Copy the title without reproducing any unusual typography, such as special capitalization or lowercasing of all letters. As for ...


1

“In contrast to the dusty, hot, stifling, and crowded city, a fitting setting for Raskolnikov's oppressive and murderous thoughts, we find, for example, 'the greenness and the freshness' of the Petersburg islands [Dostoevsky 53]. The natural surroundings reawakened in him the feelings of his youth, through which he came close to avoiding his crime and to ...


1

MLA says the following on quotes: Unless indicated in square brackets or parentheses, changes must not be made in the spelling, capitalization, or interior punctuation of the source. The terminal question mark is external punctuation, so you don't need to indicate that it's missing. At the end of a sentence ending with something in double quotes, you ...


1

Spell out abbreviations or acronyms before their initial use, and include the preferred abbreviation in parentheses after the term. Our case studies demonstrate that Next Generation Economic Technology (NGET) have already provided a wide range of environmental, security, health and safety, and economic benefits.


1

The capitalization of URLs is never directly mentioned in the MLA Handbook (8th ed.) However, Section 2.5.2 (URLs and DOIs) does refer to it indirectly: When giving a URL, copy it in full from your Web browser, but omit http:// or https://. Since I know of no web browser that retains capitalization after reaching a site, I can only assume that if we ...


1

To directly answer your question, the book series is formatted with the title case (capitalizing the first letter of each word). The MLA format for citing a book part of a series is as follows: (Author Surname), (Author First Name). (Book name in Italics, no title case). (Series Name In Title Case). (City of publication): (Name of the publishing company), (...


1

It would be better to cite the original from the Saturday Evening Post in 1958. If you can't get a copy of the original, then you could provide the web site from which you obtained a copy, but you need to provide a URL. It has been republished, so it should not be difficult to read an dependably accurate version (e.g., see this).


1

"Does such a "spoiler warning" have a place in a formal essay?" It is courteous and considerate of you to ask this question, but unless you plan to informally publish your essay (online, for instance), you may assume that your reader has already read the book and that no "spoiler alert" is required. In short, such an alert would be inappropriate in a ...


1

The main thing to keep in mind is that even though you are quoting someone else, it is you who is writing this sentence and this essay. You have the same responsibility to make it readable as any sentence that you write. And I suggest you block quote. Why mash everything together? If you are working in a word processor it likely has a blockquote style, just ...


1

I wouldn't de-contract it, as the contracted form is perfectly valid and understandable. But if I did expand out a contraction or acronym I would use []. Note that if something was said in speech, the [] is not needed as it can validly be expanded as normal speech always leaves bits out (elides things) and we are not usually even aware of this. If the non-...


1

Joseph Gibaldi, MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing, second edition (1998), touches on product and company names only once, as far as I can tell, and in that instance it doesn't italicize such names: 6.8.10 An Advertisement To cite an advertisement, state the name of the product, company, or institution that is the subject of the ...


1

I like the MLA... your question specifies the MLA... so, let's stay there. Make sure your quote is not too long. Generally the citation comes after the first short quote or after the block quote; the citation is in parentheses, e.g.: (Miligan, 23); the full citation is in the bibliography, e.g.: Miligan, George: My life along the Wabash, Harper Publishers, ...


1

From this site, it appears that your initial inclination is perfectly acceptable. Note specifically to the third example given.


1

As the comments note, you should include all the information you can but if there are no line numbers then you probably don't need to include them. You mention your teacher grading things like this harshly but it is their job to teach you how to do this. I would stop by during office hours with the question or send an email.


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