39

collective punishment is the term you're looking for and it has been practised since ancient times whenever a whole group is punished for the acts of one. Examples of collective punishment: During the finals of the national Dutch cup in April 2014, a few Ajax supporters interrupted the game by throwing fireworks on the field, and they inflicted severe ...


33

Terminology will depend on the weapon. A rifle might be plugged, usually by installing a plug in the barrel or chamber. Something larger, like a tank or a warship, might be decommissioned or, colloquially, mothballed (from the practice of preserving woolen clothing with paradichlorobenzene pellets.) Cannon may be converted into quakers, non-firing ...


14

"Safing" covers a lot of territory. I would say "safing for display" to distinguish that from safing-for-transport or safing-for-maintenance. It may be more appropriate for some weapons than others. In the missile business, we installed safing plugs into electrical sockets. Safing: As applied to weapons and ammunition, the changing from a state of ...


14

In the US Army, smoking is a general term for physical punishment, although not necessarily collective punishment, as in your example. A Wikipedia glossary of military slang has the following entry: smoke (verb) (U.S. Army) Term to describe punishment of minor offenses by means of excessive physical training. Usage: "The drill ...


13

Disabled weapons is a catch-all term used here in the UK. Unfortunately as a pair of words it's more common in other senses but a search for '"disabled weapons" legal' will return hits such as this Australian example. Unlike safing a weapon, disabling it is intended to be permanent, though reactivated weapons are a notable source of funds for criminals. As ...


12

Deactivation is the legal term in the UK which is applied to the approved methods that can be used to render a firearm inert in a way that prevents it being converted back into a live firing weapon. You even get a certificate to go with your deactivated firearm. If it's a tank or something similar, the term is only applied to the gun in it, not the whole ...


12

You might think this word applied only to territory, but demilitarize does in fact appear to be the word that the Department of Defense of the United States uses for this purpose. From a presentation by the US Defense Logistics Agency: To Demilitarize or DEMIL a piece of property means to remove its offensive and defensive capabilities. From US Army ...


12

In British military slang a semi-formal word used for extreme punishment of an individual is called a Beasting In general a group historically may have been "fizzed" generally subjected to "gravel bashing" (square bashing) In Singapore a recent common term “Standby Universe” for a specific group task that may have to be repeatedly carried out from bunk to ...


11

The OED defines it as ‘a man or woman who follows or hangs on to a camp or army, without being in military service.’ Camp followers are thus not necessarily prostitutes, but this citation form 1876 suggests they might be: Those unfortunates who are known under the euphemistic appellation of ‘camp followers’. However, as FumbleFingers has shown, the term ...


11

My research suggests the origin of 'bucking for [something]', military slang for something akin to 'trying very hard to achieve [something]' is as a periphrasis for 'washing your underwear in lye'. This somewhat startling and perhaps overstated conclusion results from my observation that early military use is associated with 'a thorough washing preparatory ...


10

Blackguard rating is not an official term; rather, Nightingale is describing her encounter with Barry as the most scurrilous scolding she had received in her life. Etymonline has blackguard, a somewhat dated term, originating 1530s, scullion, kitchen knave. Perhaps once an actual military or guard unit; more likely originally a mock-military reference to ...


9

From wikipedia: Leading zeros are always written out and are required to be spoken, so 5:43 a.m. is spoken "zero five forty-three" (casually) or "zero five four three" (military radio), as opposed to "five forty-three". From a military forum: Written: 0001 (1201AM) Verbalized: Zero oh oh One Hours (or Zero Zero Zero One Hours)


9

This is typically known as a baton in English (we imported the word from French). From Wikipedia's article on the martial baton: The ceremonial baton is a short, thick stick-like object, typically in wood or metal, that is traditionally the sign of a field marshal or a similar very high-ranking military officer, and carried as a piece of their uniform. ...


8

I was in the military, but not Viet-Nam era. From my own judgment, I don't think it has anything to do with odometers. I think it's a dark humor reference. When sighting in an M-16, the sights are adjusted in clicks. Looking downrange at a calibrated 100 yard target, one click moves the projectile/impact one inch across the face of the target. (left/...


8

Consider, incapacitate To make unable or unfit; esp., to make incapable of normal activity; disable. YourDictionary neutralize To render safe mines, bombs, missiles, and boobytraps. Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms


8

Klinger is striving for a Section 8 because being booted out of the Army for any reason is still preferable in his mind to the alternative of getting shot and killed in Korea. "Bucking for" is not solely a negative expression. A young person could be working very hard to get straight A's and could be said to be "bucking for" straight A's on his/her ...


8

Background on 'bucking' "Bucking" in the sense of "avidly pursuing" seems to have its origins in U.S. military slang, but it has much broader application today, as Kristina Lopez notes in her answer. The earliest instance of the word used in this sense, according to J.E. Lighter, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang (1993), is from 1881—and ...


7

A rating is a “sharp scolding or rebuke.” A blackguard /ˈblæɡɚd/ is a scoundrel, especially one who uses foul language. (There's even a verb form of blackguard meaning “to ridicule or denounce with abusive language.”) A blackguard rating is therefore an extremely abusive and probably foul-mouthed scolding. Nightingale is saying that she has suffered many ...


6

The British military term is undoubtedly coup de main, usually though not universally italicised as a formerly foreign term. The Wikipedia article on the Battle of Arnhem (chosen pretty much at random from dozens of examples) has "a troop of Reconnaissance jeeps from the 1st Airborne Reconnaissance Squadron, under Major Frederick Gough on Leopard who would ...


6

I believe that a/the military term is called "skylining." b. Bounding Element. Maneuver is inherently dangerous. Enemy weapons, unknown terrain, and other operational factors all increase the danger. When maneuvering, the platoon leader considers the following. (1) The bounding element must take full advantage of whatever cover and ...


6

The term arose from the use of forward observed non-line of sight artillery targeting and actually began with the United States Marine Corp during the interwar period between the Korean and Vietnam wars. The M19 mortar introduced at the time had dials for adjusting the azimuth and elevation. It produced a loud "click" sound when both dials where set to a ...


6

You didn't say which army, and in the British Army things are slightly different from the rules J.R. gives for the US Army. The NATO equivalent to US Army O-7 is OF-6, one-star general; the British Army equivalent to this rank is Brigadier, and While the corresponding rank of brigadier general in many other nations is a general officer rank, the British ...


5

General can be used as a generic title for anyone in the Army of rank O-7 or above. In the cases of 1-, 2-, and 3-star generals, their formal titles are Brigadier, Major, and Lieutenant General, but just plain General can be used, particularly verbally. "We need to clean up around here; General Parker is paying us a visit this afternoon" is a legitimate way ...


5

I'll offer a different theory origin. The phrase is a generalization of the phrase bucking for freight From the October 1857 article History of the Express Business: "Bucking for freight" as it was called, was carried to perfection by them, and it is almost incredible the pains any one of them, from the " boss" to the boy, would take to obtain even ...


5

Its not an idiom. The "the" here is not synonymous with "any". "The" is the definite article. It refers to a specific military. Which one in particular will have to be determined by context. Generally it would be the military of the country you are in, but it may also be the military of the country you are talking about. For instance Americans in ...


5

There is nothing I can find that specially addresses the OP's question about using 16:30 versus 1630 hours in the many organizations that use a 24-hour time for communications and records; they seem to adopt whatever conventions or portions thereof are useful to their own organizations for avoiding ambiguity, which is the purpose. Nor is there anything ...


5

Oxford English Dictionary has marked this definition of "here" as obsolete. They describe their rationale for obsolete words as: If an entry, sense, or lemma is no longer in use in the English language, it may be considered obsolete. This usually means that no evidence for the term can be found in modern English. The latest quotation indicates the period ...


5

Nothing is classified as "Classified". Things (generally information) are classified at some level, say as "Secret", "Top Secret", plus perhaps "NOFORN", "SCI" or "SAP" etc. When talking about some information and trying to indicate it's not to be discussed openly one might refer to it (the information) as "Classified". OK: "Hey, what's the top speed of ...


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