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Chambers online defines juxtaposition as placing or being placed together. Lexico goes a bit further and provides the definition The fact of two things being seen or placed close together with contrasting effect. I don't see any of that in the sentence you give us. Perhaps you are searching for the word metaphor which is probably a fair ...


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For favour(n.) OED gives 7.a. (concrete of 1.) Something given as a mark of favour; esp. a gift such as a knot of ribbons, a glove, etc., given to a lover, or in mediæval chivalry by a lady to her knight, to be worn conspicuously as a token of affection. 1592 Greenes Groats-worth of Witte sig. C3v She..returnd him a silke Riband for a fauour tyde ...


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This is a dramatic monologue, a poetic form that presupposes supposed listeners. Robert Browning sets in the present poem the Duke of Ferrara to speak about his former wife, the duchess of Ferrara to a guest. The reference is to painted eyes and expression in a portrait.He criticizes her for being too easily made happy or impressed. He also claims that she ...


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Generally, the term you're describing is called a term of endearment, or a way to affectionately refer to a person you hold dear. There are many of them, from shortened names (Bess for Elizabeth) to animals (bunny) or sweet things (honey, sugar) to adjectives (beautiful, gorgeous). The most important person is more specific. Your criterion suggests there ...


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The definitions of drawn and haggard are indeed similar; haggard even appears in drawn's definition on wiktionary! drawn (adj.) Appearing tired and unwell, as from stress; haggard Of a game: undecided; having no definite winner and loser haggard (adj.) Looking exhausted, worried, or poor in condition Wild or untamed Both mean tired-looking, but, in ...


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