16

So why is well, an adverb, preferred over good, an adjective, when used with linking verbs? It's well as an adjective that is preferred over good as an adjective. Though that well is also an adverb is a factor in two ways. The first is that since good is sometimes used as an adverb, and this sense is considered incorrect, some of the cases where good ...


10

Well is an adjective. well adjective (better, best) [predicative] In good health; free or recovered from illness [ODO] It just happens to have the same form as the adverb of good; and its comparative/superlative forms happen to be the same too. But it's an adjective.


3

Just to expand upon Andrew's answer, which I upvoted, the following are all legitimate, grammatical uses of well/good. (I started to put these in a comment but it got too elaborate for the medium.) I feel well. [I am not sick.] I feel good. [I am feeling buoyant or optimistic.] I feel ill. [I am sick.] I feel bad. [I am sick or I have a ...


3

I think the problem is that "Linking Verb" is not defined precisely enough. All the discussion so far has simply presupposed that there is such a category, and presumed that there was a good definition of it. Somewhere. But nobody's got one that works well enough, so far. Perhaps there isn't one. "Linking verb" is a sort of translation of the Latin copula ...


3

I believe the verb to be has a 'stative' quality. One could have said Why do you think this is so? But in the absence of so I find it unnecessary to re-instate it in brackets for the purpose of parsing the sentence. Indeed I see no reason why it cannot similarly be used in the affirmative, for example: My neighbours have gone to Spain, and I know exactly ...


3

Certain verbs are what we call subject-control verbs. This means that when they take an infinitival or gerund-participle clause as a Complement, we understand the Subject of the verb in the non-finite clause as being the same as the Subject of the verb in the matrix clause (the main verb). Let's look at an example: Bob wants the elephant to eat the donut. ...


3

The first option, "Lying on couches is boring", is correct. The word "lying" is used as a gerund here, meaning that although "lie" is a verb, "lying" is a noun. This is a singular noun, so saying "lying is boring" is just like saying "The book is boring" or "My cat is boring". "On couches" is a prepositional phrase, modifying the gerund, so basically it's ...


2

He behaves in a manner that "says" he is proud. Acts is roughly synonymous with seems. I hedge there because their complements are different. He seems proud. He seems to be proud. He acts proud. not OK He acts to be proud. He appears to be proud. He appears proud.


2

You're asking two questions regarding "all there is are idiolects" (the comma is extraneous and will be discarded for this answer), which I'll paraphrase: Is "is are" a double copula here? Is there a grammatical problem with plurality for "is are" here? 1. Is there a double copula? Copula A connecting word, in particular a form of the verb be ...


2

It's the ordinary 'linking verb' or copula, and the copula is stative—it's practically the paradigmatic stative. As for the construction, work back from the desired answer. Why is an interrogative pro-form standing for an adverbial of purpose, so it can act as a predicate complement: I think this is because X ↓ replace the adverbial with its ...


2

Though I believe this is grammatically correct, an easy fix for an example like this to improve the "sound" is to change the sentence to: Laura is a sexy lady who smells heavenly, dances salsa gracefully, and plays soccer in her free time. As "smells heavenly" is not a phrase that will be parsed by native English speakers as meaning that she has a ...


2

In the sentence 'Opportunity is missed by most people', there is no linking verb. It is an example of a passive sentence. The active form of it is, 'Most people miss opportunity'. The verb is 'miss' and its passive equivalent is formed by the auxiliary is + past participle of 'miss'. "A copular verb (also called linking verb) is a special kind of verb ...


2

It acts as an intensifier, to add emphasis to the statement that is being made. You can't use very on its own in sentences of this type ("We are very a family"); you have to say very much.


1

It's an adverb modifying (emphasizing) the verb be. Cf. certainly, surely etc. We (are) (very much) a family.         ↓             ↓         verb ← adverb of emphasis HTH.


1

In English the primary copular verb is be. The function of a copula is to link the subject of the sentence with its complements. The subject will always be a noun or noun equivalent and its complement an adjective. There are certain other verbs such as become, get, feel, look, taste, smell, and seem that can have this function. We can always replace these ...


1

In answer to your first question: No Searching for the definition of misplaced modifier on Google leads to the following: a phrase or clause placed awkwardly in a sentence so that it appears to modify or refer to an unintended word Similarly, a search on Purdue leads to the following definition: Misplaced modifiers occur when the subject of the ...


1

"Stripped" is not a verb in your example; it's an adjective functioning as a subjective predicative complement. "Stripped of all her dignity" is an adjective phrase with "stripped" as head and the PP "of all her dignity" as its complement. – BillJ


1

It isn't a strict rule. I generally use 'to be' in both formal and informal contexts. In your second example, you can't omit the verb in the first case, it needs to say The television seems to be working okay now For the second I think you could say either He walked into what seemed a cave or He walked into what seemed to be a cave


1

I think tired is being used as a perfect passive participle - "I woke up [having been] tired." In which case, woke up is a simple verb and tired is just an adjective describing I.


1

'Tired' may not be an adverb, but it is being used adverbially. Note that a comma makes 'I woke, tired' work. 'I woke [up], [being] tired.' {tired = passive participle; cf. I was tired when I woke} 'I woke [up] the baby.' {the baby = direct object}


1

The short answer is no, has is not a linking verb and no, you haven't come close to showing that it is. The long answer is that you seem to be confused about what a copula does. Traditionally it shows that two items have the same referent (The Evening Star is Venus); membership of a class (He is a teacher); or some kind of property (The rose is red). ...


1

A linking verb is one that licenses a predicate nominative, a noun or adjectival phrase that gives an equivalent for the subject or describes the subject respectively. The predicative nominative differs in a number of ways from an object, which is a noun phrase that receives the action of a transitive verb. We can use these differences to determine whether ...


1

The sentence is incorrect. 'I felt' contains the subject and the main verb. Yet, although 'being dragged by a beast' is presented in the place of an object, it doesn't parse as an object, because 'being' parses as another main verb. Simply, 'subject verb object' is the model of a correct and complete sentence, but 'subject verb verb object' is incorrect ...


1

It's bad writing to begin with, If one has to justify its meaning or explain to a reader what it should mean. In my opinion, these are better options that don't leave a reader scratching their head: 1) I felt myself being dragged by a beast. 2) I felt as if I were being dragged by a beast. (in this example you might want to say what you were being ...


1

It's not transitive. If it were, you could form the passive [*]"Patient is remained by the Federal Reserve." But that's no good, so it must be intransitive. (I'm unenthusiastic about the term "linking verb", but I suppose "remain" would be one.)


1

Part One Hungry is here used as an adjective. In the case of the verb be, it takes substantives (nouns or pronouns) or adjectives in its predicate complement, NOT adverbs. You cannot say “I am *soon.” or “I am *often.” as complete sentences with a period/full stop following: both those are wrong. This is because you cannot use an adverb to modify be any ...


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