16

Ligatures and diaereses are not generally used in modern English text. However, whether or not they are "acceptable" depends on many factors. The easiest way to judge if something is acceptable is if you have an institutional style guide that you're supposed to follow. Any reasonably complete style guide should cover this topic. I believe the most common ...


15

First, be aware that manoeuvre is now normally spelled maneuver in America, and indeed, has fallen behind maneuvre in England. Even the Economist (but not the Œconomist :) uses maneuvre now. Rendering Typographic Ligatures Correctly The general answer is that œ is considered a mere typographic ligature in written English, not a lexical ligature as it is in ...


12

It's not unheard of to see Πin English orthography, and was once much more common than it is now. These days though, it would be so rare as to be only barely acceptable, unless the word was clearly being used as a foreign word (e.g. with italics). (I personally use it privately, but I'll change it in anything being sent to an editor even if I'm not writing ...


12

Are there any other examples of English words that contain letters not found in the standard English alphabet? If for “English words”, one counts terms that appear in the Oxford English Dictionary, then yes, there are a very great many such words. Here are just a few examples of the sorts you will find there: Allerød fête ...


10

If this source is to be believed, the German Eszett is an intentional, early 20th century borrowing into Antiqua from Fraktur of a ligature of ſ and z — whether or not, in any given font, the Eszett resembles the ſ-s ligature is apparently purely a matter of typographical taste. As for the ſ-s ligature itself, it would have been in use only as long as long ...


8

The ß ligature was used as part of the apothecaries' system of weights and measures used throughout Europe. Often Latin was used as the lingua franca, but it was also used in English medical recipes. Here's an example from Sir John Floyer's A Treatise Of The Asthma (1726): Tartar prepared with Nitre ℥i. Orange Pills ℥ß. Infuse them in a Pint of Parsly-...


7

It's no longer acceptable or helpful; wikipedia style guide association of art editors style guide It's so old-fashioned that it has become an affectation, and will result in your writing being judged poorly. It's acceptable if you're quoting a language that uses them (that is, if you'd also italicise the word to show it's a foreign word) but modern ...


7

The ß ligature was never used in English typography, even when the long s was customary, for example when it was followed by a short s at the end of a word like Congress (see the US Bill of Rights). The long s–short s combination was always set as two separate characters, ſs, and although some Continental type founts combined them into a single glyph, ...


7

Longhand "sharp s" was still utilized during the late 19th century in the American Midwest. As you can see from the attached 1870 US Federal Census, the census enumerator on lines 38 and 39 scribed "Melissa" and "Clarissa" as Malißa (sic) and Clarißa.


6

I'm a bit late to this, but the ß was used on the letterhead of the Clarendon Press [Preß] at Oxford in 1963. I can't say I've ever seen another example in 20th-century English. Here's a picture:


5

The ligatures can certainly be found in English, although their use is becoming less common — probably due to the rise in personal computers and the difficulty in using ligatures with a standard keyboard. OED gives a recent citation showing the ligature: 1977 Lancet 28 May 1140/1: “In shallow diving an over-forceful Valsalva manœuvre may give ...


3

Not much to go on but here are a couple of clues: The Latin dictionary (Smith) gives the earliest date for Diphthonga as 450ish. Marc. Carp.; Prisca. Two Roman Grammarians. And Ligature even later. None of the early uncial manuscripts that I have so far looked at show ligatures, apart from the Divine monograms. The same applies to a web-site for ...


2

It seems not, at least from Google's perspective. The Google ngram viewer for extrꜵrdinary returns no results from 1500 to 2000.


2

Let’s first clarify some terminology: A letter is a basic (often atomic) element of a writing system. Which letter you use in a word depends on the orthography you use, but it does not depend on the typeface, font, handwriting style or similar. For example in standard English orthography, the word fine always consists of the letters f, i, n, and e – ...


1

Ligatures are presentation forms only; they are not in any way separate letters from those that compose them. In general, their use improves the appearance of text, mostly by avoiding “collisions” between various portions of the composing letters; an example of such a “collisions” can be seen in your example; in the last row, the top ...


1

From your link: Many scripts do not require CTL. For instance, the Latin alphabet or Chinese characters can be typeset by simply displaying each character one after another in straight rows or columns. Yes, exceptions are mentioned, like cursive writing, that you mentioned yourself. But the basic statement remains that CTL does not normally occur in ...


1

One of the advantages of using non-WYSIWYG typesetting software such as LaTeX is that it takes care of ligatures for you (and respects the style settings put in effect by the journal editor). See https://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/ligatures This won't automatically produce any of the ligature examples in your question, probably because they ...


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