Hot answers tagged

46

As a matter of style, many U.S. publishers follow the general rules given by the Chicago Manual of Style, fifteenth edition (2003) at 7.51, 7.53, and 7.54 under the heading "FOREIGN WORDS": 7.51 Italics. Italics are used for isolated words and phrases in a foreign language if they are likely to be unfamiliar to readers. [Examples omitted.] ... 7....


24

Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. (p.365) says that commonly used Latin words and abbreviations should not be italicized, and lists "et al." as an example.


17

From my Organic Chemistry days, I remember that the isomers (compounds with the same chemical formula but different structures), for cis and trans, were italicized. If you look on the Wikipedia page for cis-trans isomerism, it follows this convention, as every cis and every trans is italicized. Cis is Latin for same side. A cis bond is one where the the ...


17

"Sans" is a common enough word in English that I would not bother with italics. But I also think in your sentence that the word "without" scans better, and I'd use that instead of "sans" for esthetics reasons.


14

Stage direction — as mentioned in The Free Dictionary. When the play is actually staged, as StoneyB says: The action itself is called business in The Profession, unless it involves movement from one location to another, when it is called a cross, verb to cross. All business and crosses together constitute blocking; the director (producer in GB) blocks ...


12

Eighteenth-century attempts to clarify the source of italics in quotations Google Books searches for various phrases containing italics or emphasis uncover two attempts from the late 1700s to distinguish between italics or other special typographic treatments that appeared in the original version of a quotation and emphatic typography that the quoting author ...


12

It is done to make a clear distinction between the two 'their's in the sentence. The sentence can easily be split into two halves: Some elections are held in friendly client states to legitimize their rulers and regimes and ... others are held in disfavored or enemy countries to legitimize their political systems. In the first half, 'their' ...


11

According to the Associated Press Stylebook, you should use quotation marks around the titles of books, songs, television shows, computer games, poems, lectures, speeches and works of art. You don't need to use quotations around the names of magazine, newspapers, the Bible or books that are catalogues of reference materials. None of them are required to be ...


10

No, you should not italicise the 's. The reason behind that is that italicisation is part of giving importance or a style to a title, now if you italicize the 's it will become part of the name itself. But if you don't continue the italicisation it will mean that you have added it on purpose. Chinatown's means the movie name is "Chinatown's". Chinatown's ...


8

Look at the spelling pronunciation key for dictionary.com. This tells you what all these strange spellings mean. Dictionary.com uses a non-standard phonetic respelling. You can also get the IPA (international phonetic alphabet) pronunciation by clicking the IPA/Spell button.


7

I realise this is an old post, but I was searching for guidance on this issue myself, and, unfortunately, things have changed. The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, now says (§6.2) that punctuation surrounding a word or phrase should be in the font of the surrounding text, unless the punctuation is part of the text in question (e.g., the movie title ...


6

Yes, this is perfectly fine. For example. Jack thinks it is impossibly difficult, but I think it only implausibly so.


6

Because italicizing for emphasis can select any word as well as parts of words, italicizing an article means that you are emphasizing that article for some purpose. Compare: "Is it a orange?" "No, it is an orange." (An emphasized in contrast to "a.") "Is it an apple?" "No, it is an orange." (Orange ...


5

It's better to rewrite the possessive of something inanimate (like a movie). Chinatown's plot... => The plot of Chinatown... This becomes even more evident when the movie ends in an s. The Silence of the Lambs's protagonist... => The protagonist of Silence of the Lambs... While this sidesteps your question, if one must choose how to italicize, ...


5

Bill's right that libraries and (most) bookshops don't worry about stylization within titles; and that the 'house style' for the place your writing is published is the most important factor. But if you do want to retain the emphasis on one word, the usual convention is to take out of italics the part that would normally be italicized: 'Choose the Red Pill ...


5

It depends on what you're talking about, and how formal you're being. I would normally use Wh-questions when talking about any phenomenon that applied to all such questions, not just Why. By the same token, if there were something specific to Why-questions (e.g, embedded Why-questions don't allow reduction with relative infinitives, the way how ...


5

Given that "sans" apparently entered early enough and/or become so much part of the language that it is primarily pronounced /sænz/ and not /sɒ̃/, then it is not required that you italicise. On the other hand, if you do prefer the latter pronunciation (as I do) i.e. you are borrowing from modern French, where you're using phonemes that aren't really used ...


4

In the examples you cited, both the quotes and the italics are being used for emphasis-- they're drawing attention to a specific term that you want the reader to distinguish. In that case, both are fairly interchangeable, though each will read better in a different situation. Italics are generally used for emphasis, or to draw attention to a special term e....


4

In formal writing which preserves the use–mention distinction and has access to both roman and italic faces, your third choice is the preferred rendering: Does the h come before the g or after it? For example, in the OED’s entry for the letter g, they write: From the 13th c., however, the ȝ was by some scribes wholly or partially discarded for y or gh;...


4

It is italicized based on the mistaken belief that there is a convention. The ACS Style Guide is considered the authority for writing chemical names in English. On page 145 we see that cis and trans (and all other locants) only need to be italicized when hyphenated in a chemical name, e.g. cis- 4-Chloro-3-buten-2-one. This clarifies their role in the name. ...


4

The answer appears to be no. On page 22 of this sample reference list by the APA, there is an example of an article that ends in a question marks, just like yours (though it’s from a paper journal, not an online one): Ohnishi, T., Matsuda, H., Tabira, T., Asada, T., & Uno, M. (2001). Changes in brain morphology in Alzheimer’s disease and exaggerated ...


4

Style guide preferences on the question of whether to use quotation marks or italics for titles of works vary depending on the guide and on the type of work that the title is associated with. But whatever the type of title, I have never seen a style guide recommend using both italics and quotation marks for the whole thing except in the context of dialogue ...


3

If you are writing to a style guide, then follow it above anything I say below (though note that it may give some leeway). Because your theme is German history, the reader is going to expect a certain number of German words to be used, and that context reduces the "foreign-ness", so to speak compared to if e.g. I used a Latin phrase somewhere in this answer,...


3

I'd prefer it if you did, please, for two reasons: I know the word sans in French but not in English ... italicizing it in a sentence warns me that there's something unusual about the word. Normally when I read a sentence I scan the whole sentence, but italicizing a word is a cue for me to scan/read that word individually. It's normal to use 'punctuation' ...


3

This is purely a question of style, i.e. one of those conventions that may differ from field to field, but aside from that do not matter one bit to anyone at all. So ask your teacher/advisor, or check what your peers do. If nobody can tell you "always use A, never use B", then go with whatever you want. Just make sure to be consistent. Pick one style and ...


3

Referring to the "holy grail" of programming books, SICP, we can see the authors use a mono-spaced font for all non-literary words (i.e. anything that is a code snippet, function name, variable, state, keyword, etc). I would reserve italics for actually emphasizing words; using italics to highlight names and such deprives you of the ability to use italics ...


3

The general advice is to revert to roman within a block of italics. Here are a couple of sources: When a title or sentence is italicized, a word that normally would be italicized in running text—such as a foreign word, the scientific name of a plant or animal, or a ship—should appear in roman type. This is called reverse italics. - from the Editorial Style ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible