10

In Received Pronunciation, Standard* British English and most New Zealand accents, /r/ is only pronounced when it precedes a vowel sound, so the “r” in “heart” is not pronounced. But in Standard* American English and in many UK regional accents the /r/ is pronounced. That’s why we include it in the spelling. When the /r/ is pronounced it is known as a ...


7

The two main types of property ownership in Britain are freehold and leasehold. Freehold means that the owner owns the property and the land it stands on. In leasehold arrangements, you buy a lease on a property for a certain number of years, sometimes as much as 999 years. That entitles you to occupy the property and sell the lease, but you don’t own the ...


6

The name of the British and Irish Lions suggests that, in practice, the term you seek is "British and Irish".


6

I am working for an international organisation which includes most of Europe, but also some other major Anglophone countries (most notably the US). Although effectively all communication happens in English (and de facto in AmE), if one were to propose the actual adoption of English as a lingua franca within the organisation, countries like France and Germany ...


5

In the UK, certainly, a fanny is slang for vagina. A lady's front bits would definitely mean vagina and not breasts. A less-oft-used term is "front bum" which is also slang for vagina. I have never known front bits refer to breasts.


5

Notice that when pronouncing, rabbit, barrow or ruler the lips are pushed outward forming a small "oh" shape, while when pronouncing heart the lips to do not move like while the tongue is pushed up against the inside face (lingual) of the upper teeth. Try pronouncing heart with the lips out forming an "oh" and see if that feels natural-- it doesn't. They ...


4

Charles Carson - butler: Yorkshire (ref) John Bates - the earl's valet Sarah O'Brien - the countess's maid Anna Smith - Lady Mary's maid Thomas Barrow - footman: Mancunian (ref) Mrs. Hughes - housekeeper: West Scots (ref 1, ref 2) Daisy Mason - cook's aid Mrs. Patmore - cook: Mancunian (ref) Tom Branson - chauffeur Joseph Molesley - footman Dr. Clarkson - ...


4

There are two phrases used in England, thought the first is fairly uncommon and the other is very rare. Shared freehold. The owners are leaseholders with long leases, but typically each owns a share of a company which in turns owns the freehold of the property. It is similar in some ways to a US co-op Commonhold. A modern innovation copying some foreign ...


4

Languages change. Otherwise, we'd still be speaking like Chaucer. The British settlement of America started in the 17th century; there has been lots of time since then for several different American dialects to develop. The British settlement of Australia and New Zealand started over 100 years later, which is why these dialects are closer to those spoken in ...


4

In British English fanny means a woman's genitals, and the NOAD adds also that it means a person's buttocks. Actually, the NOAD reports first "a person's buttocks," and then the British meaning. The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary says that bits means a person's genitals, or a woman's breasts. The same dictionary says that fanny means the female genitals, ...


3

I remember reading somewhere that the opposing meanings of the term "to table" on either side of the pond caused confusion at meetings between the British and American heads of state during the second world war. edit: found it, from Winston Churchill's book The Second World War, Volume III, The Grand Alliance: The enjoyment of a common language was of ...


3

I work for various educational institutions in Germany and, therefore, within the EU. I can confirm that British English is the preferred variety of English used within the 28 EU member states. When using the European Commission's website, http://ec.europa.eu/translation/english/english_en.htm, the translation information into English corresponds ...


2

AFAIK it doesn't exist either as a legal term or a conversational term in the UK (I don't know about Ireland, but I suspect the same is true). I am not aware of a short way of distinguishing between a flat that is rented and one that is owned; or between a block of flats that are rented and a block of flats that are owned.


2

There is no /r/ sound in ‘heart’. It is pronounced /hɑːt/.


2

I'm from the UK, but will use US spellings in some contexts. Programming languages generally use US spellings, the HTML center tag or the CSS color property for example, and it can be a bit jarring to write stuff like "use color to set the colour". Another issue is that spell checkers are always either US or UK, so you end up with loads of red lines on ...


2

It does not make any sense to talk about “hard” or “soft” here. Language can easily be any of these and more, depending on the speaker: [ˈlæŋwɪdʒ] [ˈlæŋwədʒ] [ˈlæŋgwɪdʒ] [ˈlæŋgwədʒ] [ˈleŋwɪdʒ] [ˈleŋwədʒ] [ˈleŋgwɪdʒ] [ˈleŋgwədʒ] Other variants include: a diphthongization of the initial vowel into [eɪ]. opening the initial vowel from [e] to [ɛ] or from [æ] ...


2

The majority of the people who populated Australia and New Zealand (and English South Africa) didn't speak whatever was the RP English of its time anyway (Kentish perhaps), they spoke all different dialects of English including Irish, Scottish, Northern, Western and probably even Brummie. Imagine all those people stuck together having to converse with each ...


2

The flow of expressions between British and American English doesn't just go one way, although I expect today that the predominant direction is from the US to the UK. There is an English professor who has a blog where he talks about Britishisms entering American English.


1

I might be mistaken, but my impression is that in England, to "knock (someone) up" means to go to their house and knock on the door. In America, it means to make someone pregnant. Also "pissed" in England usually means drunk. In America, it's short for "pissed off", which means "very angry".


1

A few examples right off the bat: The word spunk has a secondary offensive meaning in British English Pants are undergarments in British English and outer wear in American English Floor numbering is different. Brits have a ground floor, just like Germans, the Dutch and other European countries. In America, the first floor is on the ground. The C-word is a ...


1

Miss O'Brien regularly speaks in a gently scouse accent from the Liverpool area, West Midlands. This would also be consistent with her Irish surname.


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