41

I think the meaning of 'use' had set you on the wrong track, plus an assumption that English always was as it is now. The meaning of 'use' here (all definitions from OED) is not the sense of 'To put to practical or effective use; to make use of, employ, esp. habitually.' nor 'To observe, practise, or engage in.' but IV. To accustom; to be ...


15

The first example, "it is worth mentioning that", is acceptable. The second, "it is worth to mention that", is incorrect. One might correct it by saying: It is worth it to mention that... Though this is a very awkward construction. A better version might be: It is worthwhile to mention that... As to why these particular constructions are ...


13

It's a quote. One of the very first anthems of the women's movement was Helen Reddy's 1970s hit "I Am Woman" (see Wikipedia for the song's history). Its opening lines are I am woman, hear me roar In numbers too big to ignore The line "I am woman, hear me roar" has since become something of a catchphrase (Wikipedia). Katy Perry's song of empowerment ...


10

Right. "Sorry to bother you" is more idiomatic than its other variants. "I'm sorry to bother you" puts it unquestionably in the present. I would use "sorry to bother you" at the beginning of a conversation and "sorry for bothering you" at the end of a conversation. Having said that, there are several other possibilities, such as: "I'm sorry to be ...


9

We often use gerund-participle clauses when we want to use a verb as a Subject: Smoking is bad for you. Using a keyboard is better In English, we don't like to use infinitival clauses as Subjects, though. Although to do so is grammatical (see what I just did there?), it places a lot of strain on the listener. The following sentence is grammatical, but is ...


8

Both sentences are correct. They have a different meaning. “Try to” implies that the action that is attempted may or may not succeed. Try to give up candy; maybe you will succeed in refraining from eating candy, or maybe you will succumb to the temptation and eat candy anyway. “Try + -ing” indicates that the action may or may not have the desired result. ...


8

The quoted line had 'used to' as an adjective in the sense 'habituated'. As a modal auxiliary it is not used. The verb phrase is 'had been'. When 'used to' is a modal auxiliary, it means habitual action in the past and doesn't have verb conjugation except omission of infinitival 'to' after it. In this sense, your substitution is incorrect.


7

I don't think they are correct, close and understandable but not how a native English speaker would say it, I would say "He seems to not want us to help" and "He seems to want us to help" negative questions are usually confusing so I'm not sure I can help you there. "It seems to not be working for me" "It doesn't seem to work for me" would be the same ...


6

The Grammaring Guide to English Grammar has this to say. Gerund as Subject A gerund clause can be the subject of a sentence: - Hiking can be a relaxing and rewarding activity. - Swimming in the winter can boost your immune system. - Learning a foreign language is easier at a young age. The use of the gerund as subject is more common than that ...


5

I never find much difference in use of infinitive and gerund. However, it is always suggested that few verbs are always followed by gerund whereas few are followed by infinitives only. I found a good distinction somewhere over the Internet which may help Gerund Often we use the gerund for an action that happens before or at the same time as the action of ...


5

This can be seen in two ways. To see how, substitute their for participants’, and then them for participants. Use the first if you want to emphasise the act of bringing and the second if you want to emphasise that it is they who are doing it.


5

In the example you gave, "to seeing" is correct. To understand why, let's think about different meanings of the word to. To can be part of a verb in the infinitive: "To be or not to be,..." or "I can't wait to see the Rocky Mountains." The to is part of the action. To can also be a preposition, a word that demonstrates a relationship with something. Here ...


5

Without any supporting context, the inferences that can be drawn here are fairly subjective, but here (for what it's worth) are mine: He donated a million dollars for keeping the tigers alive. = He donated a million dollars in order to pay for their upkeep. He donated a million dollars to keep the tigers alive. = The tigers were about to die, and he ...


5

Piling on to what others have already said, I would argue that the usage here is flat wrong. There is an implied tense mismatch at work ... when you use the infinite form "to include" with a list of items, you are implying future composition of those items, which may or may not come to pass. Since all of these cases reference past events explicitly, such ...


5

Yes, it was incorrect to say "to include" rather than "including". This error is almost universal among U.S. military officers. Most of them say "to include" in every single case where they should say "including". Every time. And this has been true for at least the last three decades. I have no idea how this started, but it is easy to imagine a folk ...


5

The verb AVOID can take a noun phrase (a phrase headed by a noun) as a Complement: Avoid [the rush]. Many verbs that can take a noun phrase as a Complement cannot take finite clauses as Complements: *We wanted to avoid [we did that]. (ungrammatical) Many verbs that take noun phrases as Complements cannot take to-infinitival clauses as Complements: *We ...


5

Those are three different problems. "He had me do this” vs “He had my doing this” The former is correct. The latter is nonsensical. He said me being here was wonderful. Yes, logically, it should be my, but no one ever says it like that. It's always me in this case. Go figure. She had made public an account of being groped by ...


5

Is “I dislike to go there” a wrong sentence? ᴛʟᴅʀ: Like like, historically dislike took a ᴛᴏ-infinitive not an -ɪɴɢ verb, but over the last century common usage has swapped those two preferences and now the ᴛᴏ-infinitive sounds distinctly odd to the modern ear. At the same time, dislike has also been replaced by don’t like, so even dislike seems old. Your ...


4

The second formulation contains an error in the grammar. You need at least some version of past tense rather than I fail to find. I suggest the following changes: 1) I would use the past perfect (i.e. I had failed) rather than simple past here to express this a further past relative to your main clause. 2) I would reorder the clauses such that the ...


4

Infinitives and gerunds are sometimes used interchangeably; sometimes it works, and sometimes not. They are not the same. Saying "You are to include waterboarding" is not the same as saying "You are including waterboarding." Saying "I am swimming with the team" is not the same as saying "I am to swim with the team." The infinitive should represent an ...


4

As a civilian editor who works for the Army, I see this way more than in that report. My own take on it (based on hearing people say it, almost daily) is that it is meant in the sense of a command. But as an indefinite infinitive, it is far less inclusive than "including," because it leaves open the possibility of might include and might not include. I ...


4

You might find more info at the following questions and their duplicates: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/106257/helping-improve-or-help-to-improve "Help rule out" vs. "help to rule out" What is the correct way to use infinitive after the verb "help": with or without "to"? Little Eva's comment is ...


4

Whoever wrote your exam is pretending they is an invalid pronoun to use when the referent is one. They expect you to write the same word each time: If one has a special medical condition such as diabetes, epilepsy, or allergy, it is advisable that one carry some kind of identification in order to avoid being given improper medication in an emergency. I ...


4

Do you know the way to San Jose? Now there's a sentence which contains a to but no infinitive of a verb. Your second group are a bit like that. The gerund is a noun (from a verb). So saying I got used to reading is grammatically no different to saying I got used to Michael. Or He went back to studying just like He went back to Minneapolis. But the infinitive ...


4

I don't know the right way of analysing this, but it seems to me to have to do with grammatical aspect. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Huddleston and Pullum) interprets English as having two aspects, progressive and non-progressive. (The perfect is not considered to be an aspect; it's treated as a distinct system for various reasons.) As far ...


4

You certainly can. What makes your example odd is that "be important" does not readily accept an infinitive clause as its subject, though it does as complement: ? To make friends is important. It is important to make friends. But with other words, it is fine. WS2 gives the exmple of the proverb "To err is human, to forgive divine". But ...


4

Compare these two sentences: You're gonna hear me roar. -and- You're gonna hear me roaring. The first is far more definite and assertive. It has a defiant, almost challenging, quality to it. I'm going to win! You're not going to stop me! The second is more fluid, extending out into the future toward some indefinite possible stopping point. I'm going to be ...


4

I think your confusion is related to the use of the infinitive with the passive form of "believe". When certain verbs expressing opinion or reasoning are used in the passive, they can take the infinitive, but a different construction is required when such verbs are in the active form (that + noun + verb in active form). If the subject of the passive form is ...


3

The short answers: Q1 — "watched her dance" and "watched her dancing" are both acceptable. There are slightly different connotations but the meaning is clear. Pragmatically, they mean the same thing. Q2 — "strike the pole" and "striking the pole" are both acceptable. There are slightly different connotations but the ...


3

I would like to share some of my thoughts. Though the 90% rule is good enough for beginner and intermediate learners, I would like to add that, very likely, it would be insufficient for more advanced learners. (I'm not a native English speaker, so I understand the problem from their side perfectly.) If your students are willing to remember grammar rules, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible