13

The short answer is that no, they do not mean the same thing. The first with an inflection of the progressive construction be playing is a simple statement of the evidentiary future, but the second with an inflection of will play is a statement of a future that the speaker insists must come to pass. Probabilities vs Demands When someone says: I will not ...


5

This is reported speech, where we backshift tenses. Backshifting happens when a verb tense is shifted back to a past form in reported speech. What was said by John: "I am hungry." In reported speech, we see "John said that he was hungry." In your example "I told him I wasn’t playing soccer anymore", what was actually said was &...


4

One can write a sentence with a partial quotation: Direct speech: We live in a madhouse! We have to move. She says they "live in a madhouse" most of the time. This is unobtrusive: the quotation is direct speech, because the exact words are repeated, made to fit into the syntax of the sentence, which was easy enough. It is a predicate, so it fits ...


3

Be is not always required to mark passive voice. There are other constructions like the one in the example given where the passive is not marked by be (CaGEL p1245): i Most of the sense verbs I heard the window broken. ii Get and have: She got/had the house painted. I had my wallet stolen. iii Like, want, report,fear and order; here the past-participial is ...


1

If looking only at the phrase itself without any context, the report finished is an active-voice construction. Semantically, it's strange. It's ascribing an action to a report—something that isn't normally done. But that doesn't make it any less an active-voice construction. The following sentences are in the active voice: The dog jumped. The woman laughed. ...


1

"They claimed it was neither the time nor the place for that, and asked for help." If the subject is known, you want to use the personal pronoun (he/she) accordingly.


1

There's no "exact" way to convert exclamatory utterances from direct to reported speech. Here are my best efforts for a few typical examples... 1: "What a pity!" said John = John said it was such a pity 2: "How kind of her!" said John = John said she was very kind 3: "Thank you, Jane" said John = John thanked Jane ......


1

He said, "I have started a job." Or He said, "I started a job." Both are correct because both present perfect and past simple tense are changed into past perfect tense in indirect speech.


1

Well, one of the ways you can use the word "want" (as well as the phrase "would like") is by putting a noun and a passive participle after it. Examples are: I want this building demolished. (The meaning is similar to "I would be happy if somebody demolished this building".) I want him out. (The meaning is similar to "I ...


1

(1) I agree that the sentence you mark as wrong is much better without the that; (2) do not look to Wikipedia for good English. I would leave the that out in both sentences, the one you marked wrong and the one you quote from Wikipedia.


1

'Would + verb' either stays the same (if it is a more general statement), or can, but does not need to, change into 'would have + past participle' (if we are hypothesising). 'I would buy it if I had the money,’ he said. -> He said he would buy it if he had the money. ‘I’ll help you if you need a volunteer’ / ‘I’d help you if you needed a volunteer.’ -> He ...


1

He said, "I'd say a lot depends on the student." When reported: He said he would say that a lot depended on the student. Old style : He said he would have said that a lot depended on the student.


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