We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

New answers tagged

0

CON-tent used in a sentence: One single sock was the [CON-tent] content of the suitcase. If we stress the second syllable, [con-TENT] we are referring to a positive state of mind, simply put, happy. After the Thanksgiving meal, all the family appeared to be [con-TENT] content.


0

There are two different pronunciations. However, they're based more on definition than by their place in a sentence. Content as a noun (definition 1), meaning substance/information, is pronounced "KON-tent." Content as an adjective, verb, or noun (definition 2), meaning satisfied/make satisfied/satisfaction, is pronounced "kuhn-TENT."


1

I guess the reason why the pronunciation of rendezvous in English approximates the French pronunciation and does not sound the z of rendez and the s of vous might be that when English-speaking people are taught the rudiments of French, they learn that vous, a high frequency pronoun, is pronounced /vu/ (I leave aside liaison of vous with a following vowel ...


8

Wells in his Pronunciation Dictionary has /swi:t/ (=sweet) for suite in both British and American English but has the following remark: but in American English sometimes /su:t/ in the sense 'suite of furniture'. Presumably some Americans make a distinction between a hotel suite /swi:t/ and a suite /su:t/ of furniture.


9

The OED says "Pronunciation: Brit. /swiːt/ , U.S. /swit/", so apparently this is not 'normal' anywhere. It's an easy mistake to make, though, and I see no reason why it should be confined to India. It may be fair, however, to say that European-connected countries are more aware of French roots and pronunciation, so less likely to fall into this ...


1

Understanding is not a matter of distance but of completeness. So alternatives you could use are: How well have you understood my question. How completely have you understood my question. How much have you understood the information. Note, for the last one we can't use "question" because much relates to the quantity of a substance not the ...


1

In the US, I've seen the term would be X referring to something that would have, under given circumstances, been something, but for some reason, it didn't come to be this way. For example, a would be doctor might refer to someone who was studying and was ready to receive their doctorate, but then suffered an accident that caused this person to miss their ...


1

She is his would-be wife. means that she wants to be his wife. It's from older English where "She would be his wife" means that she wants to be his wife. It does not mean that the wedding is planned. (It could also mean that he wants her to be his wife, but that would be less usual). The usage is a bit old. The modern equivalent is "wanna-be wife". 'Wife-...


2

Summarizing/extending the comments: Fiancé is used to refer to someone who is formally engaged to be married, but the marriage has not yet happened. Sometimes people add an "e" to the end (i.e., fiancée) to refer to a female, but not reliably and "fiancé" is often used as a gender-neutral form. Grammatically, you almost always hear it in a possessive ...


0

In the US, "would be wife" or "would be husband" are unusual. They don't necessarily indicate that the marriage is going to happen. One might get the impression that it's a hopeful arrangement instead of an agreement. Some better options are fiancé/fiancée or as you suggested, husband-to-be/wife-to-be or future husband/future wife. Bride-to-be and future ...


Top 50 recent answers are included