21 votes

Your will be done or Your will will be done

The 'will' in "Your will be done" is a noun. One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands. And the 'be' is the imperative form of the verb 'to be'. So, taken together, "Your will be ...
Mark Beadles's user avatar
  • 22.7k
15 votes

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

OK, first the vocatives. When we name the person we're addressing, the term for that is a Vocative noun phrase. For instance: Honey, I'm home. Mom, you just don't understand. Sandra, he's coming to ...
John Lawler's user avatar
10 votes

"May I have a mango!" is it an Imperative, Optative or Interrogative sentence?

This expression could be optative, and the use of an exclamation mark would support that interpretation. However, the sentence is not idiomatic for an optative sentence: it's idiomatically a question. ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
  • 102k
8 votes

Meaning of "fast inside" (in context)

In this sentence, fast is not a verb, it's an adverb, qualifying “inside the machine”. There is no verb in the main clause, just like there is no verb in the previous sentence. You can add “they are” ...
Gilles 'SO- stop being evil''s user avatar
7 votes

"We must act and ACT NOW" - Is this sentence an imperative sentence?

Short answer This is a declarative sentence, used as a directive. Although it is a directive, it is not an imperative. Declarative sentences are never imperatives. A quick way to tell it's not an ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Your will be done or Your will will be done

Like Mr Beadles said, the 'will' here is a noun. It's not an imperative, though, which would be a command to an implied you to perform the action of the verb. What is actually going on is that it is ...
lly's user avatar
  • 10.3k
7 votes

Is "Do this, please" an imperative sentence?

Short answer (tl;dr) In terms of illocutionary force, or type of speech act, the addition of the word please will change the sentence from an order to a polite request (all other things being equal). ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
6 votes

Imperative well-wishing

These are short for wishes, blessings, or curses addressed to a listener, usually with may, like (May you) sleep well/win the race/break a leg! (May you) have a good time/a safe flight/a happy Holi! (...
John Lawler's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Is "Don't worry" a complete sentence?

Yes, it is. It's a negative imperative. The imperative mood is used for commands, exhortation, requests, and other sentences where the addressee is being asked, ordered, or advised to do something. ...
verbose's user avatar
  • 2,361
6 votes

Can an imperative sentence have a subject?

Does it make any sense to say that there is an implied subject "you" making the sentence: Yes. Here are some sources discussing the "you-understood" that include examples like the ...
garnerstan's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is "Be ye..." subjunctive or imperative?

In Early Modern English, it could have been either. The subjunctive and the imperative both used the bare infinitive, and while the imperative wasn't always followed by thou or ye, it could be. When ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
5 votes

Does "Welcome, Campers" require a comma?

Direct address normally requires a comma before the name of the person being addressed: Come here, Tom. Get the lead out, Barney. See, Anita? That's how it's done. Welcome, campers! You will see ...
Robusto's user avatar
  • 152k
4 votes

"We must act and ACT NOW" - Is this sentence an imperative sentence?

It is not an imperative. @Araucaria has explained it well. However, it is using a figure of speech called Anadiplosis, since the word act is placed at the end of first sentence and at the beginning ...
NVZ's user avatar
  • 22.6k
4 votes
Accepted

Which question tag is correct? "Shut the door, will you?" or "Shut the door, won't you?"

Both #1 and #2 are okay and mean approximately the same. "Shut the door, won't you?" is slightly more polite, because the tag at the end suggests that you might not be willing to comply, and that is a ...
Greg Lee's user avatar
  • 17.4k
4 votes
Accepted

Is "Drink milk." a legal imperative sentence?

Articles are generally only needed if they refer to a single object or quantity. "Drink the milk." is a valid sentence as you noted, indicating that there is some obvious milk available. "Drink a ...
Kamil Drakari's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Will you/won't you?

Well, either is grammatically correct, but they have different meanings. When using question tags, we use the negative form of what we want/mean. According to this eslbase.com page: If the auxiliary ...
AndyT's user avatar
  • 14.8k
4 votes
Accepted

Can I say 'right up' as a request to have a ship righted?

No, the verb is right. It's not a phrasal verb right up. It is transitive and requires an object, "Right it." All of Oxford/Lexico's examples illustrate this: we righted the capsized dinghy ...
Andrew Leach's user avatar
  • 102k
4 votes
Accepted

What is the grammatical mood of the sentence "Someone stop that person"?

Someone stop that person: the verb stop is in the imperative mood in That's correct. 'stop' is in the (exhortative) subjunctive mood That's not. You can easily prove this syntactically. One test is ...
JK2's user avatar
  • 6,573
3 votes

Is 'you are required' an imperative?

Imperatives use the base form of the verb (including the verb to be) and issue commands or directives: Come here! Stop that! Be quiet! Be ready to leave at 6 o'clock. You are required ...
Shoe's user avatar
  • 33.1k
3 votes

Can all base forms of verbs express wish?

The answer to your question is mostly "no". This is not an especially productive construction these days. These third-person imperatives are differently expressed now, although the old style can ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 135k
3 votes

What is the difference between "Don't be..." and "Be not..."?

What is the difference between "Don't be..." and "Be not..."? There is no difference in meaning: both express a negative imperative. "Be not..." is an old-fashioned form ...
Greybeard's user avatar
  • 42k
3 votes
Accepted

Is there a well-known secular sentence that uses all three of the imperative, indicative, and subjunctive moods?

Well, subjunctive mood is a bit opaque to me, and it's more than one sentence, but perhaps Just sit right back And you'll hear a tale A tale of a fateful trip, That started from this tropic port, ...
1006a's user avatar
  • 22.8k
3 votes
Accepted

Why is “Don't you forget about me” a correct use of the imperative?

This is a turn of phrase that is used often in American English. Not only in the example given in comments. It's not even only "don't you" do something. Explicitly stating the subject you ...
Jesse Williams's user avatar
3 votes

Is it possible to make a declarative sentence starting with 'Can'?

Your example sentence is more nearly imperative than declarative, but whatever terminology you apply to it, it isn't a normal interrogative form, and—at least according to The Chicago Manual of Style, ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
3 votes

Is it possible to make a declarative sentence starting with 'Can'?

Of course we can do so: "Can" is a modal auxiliary verb. Can pigs fly is a question that puzzles me. However, you are probably interested in situations in which "can" is not used ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
2 votes

Etymology of "let us" and "let's"

In Glaswegian dialect "give us" is often contracted in this way. The verb itself is changed to "gie" (interestingly, it becomes regular: past simple and past participle "gied") and "give us" is ...
user237807's user avatar
2 votes

What is the history of the oh-so-common English phrase, "come on!"?

Coverage of 'come on' in idiom dictionaries Christine Ammer, The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms, second edition (2013) has this entry for "come on": come on 1. Move forward, ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
  • 163k
2 votes

Is it "Don't let's" or "Let's don't"?

Don't let's forget the 1943 Noel Coward song "Don't Let's Be Beastly To The Germans". If we un-contract, it becomes "Do not let us be beastly to the Germans" which is perfectly acceptable English. So ...
squidlydeux's user avatar
  • 1,210
2 votes
Accepted

In the movie "The Book of Eli", why did the writers not conjugate the verb in "Cursed be the ground for our sake"?

This is an archaic use of the subjunctive, which only survives in certain fixed phrases. Compare: Long live the king. God bless America. Heaven forbid. Devil take the hindmost. It means "...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
2 votes

In the movie "The Book of Eli", why did the writers not conjugate the verb in "Cursed be the ground for our sake"?

You are correct that the form be here is a somewhat archaic imperative—not truly a subjunctive, though identical in form. But your paraphrase misses the mark: the equivalent PDE (Present-Day ...
Brian Donovan's user avatar

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