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29

Bite the hand that feeds you This idiom is used by an observer to say that a party being helped attacks the helper. (The observer has a sense of unfairness about the transaction. But there is probably not a sense that the disadvantaged attacker sees the feeding hand as taking an unfair advantage.) Show ingratitude, turn against a benefactor. For example, ...


28

“No good deed [ever] goes unpunished.” This is more general than how you described your phrase, because it might not be the person you helped who “punishes” you (you might say it when you get in trouble with someone else, instead). In origin, this is a cynical reversal of either or both of these beliefs: “No good deed goes unrewarded” “No evil deed goes ...


20

“There’s no pleasing some people” This saying that captures the idea of a person (or people) who would never thank you for helping them. It’s informal in tone, and is used in both American and British English. This does not imply that the person would think of you as an enemy for helping you, only that if you do help them, they will just find something new ...


16

A particularly harsh English proverb along these lines appears in the following form in Wolfgang Mieder, A Dictionary of American Proverbs (1992): Save a thief from the gallows and he'll be the first to cut your throat. Versions of this proverb go very far back in English writing. Bartlett Whiting, Proverbs, Sentences, and Proverbial Phrases from English ...


6

Damned if you do, damned if you don’t. This is a common English expression that basically says that no matter whether you try to help or not, people are going to hate you for it, so you’re damned either way. If you help, they will accuse you of belittling them, virtue signaling your own generosity, or even trying to harm them in some way. If you don’t help, ...


4

You’re dealing with a “choosing beggar” (or “choosy beggar”) I think my other answer is better, but I offer this for completeness. It’s more specific than your phrase, and may not be applicable. It derives from the saying, “beggars can’t be choosers”, meaning that when someone freely offers you help, it is wrong to be critical about how the help is given. So ...


4

One can actually say "I managed to steal a few precious moments / minutes / hours with my family." “To my delight, before the graduation ceremony began, I was able to steal a few minutes with an old friend.” ........... To "steal" time in this way is to be able to assign, set aside, or reserve that time for a particular reason or ...


3

Antecedents of the expression in question Antecedents to the exact expression "sell [one's] soul to the devil" go back considerably earlier than the OED's circa 1570 citation. A search of Early English Books Online turns up several relevant instances. From a 1509 translation of Antoine de La Sale, The Fyftene Joyes of Maryage: I wyll that ye so ...


3

There's an old idiom, which I cannot find now in a quick search: "Help some people and they'll never forgive you". Applies where the person doesn't think you helped them correctly, doesn't believe your contribution really benefited them, or takes offense that your assistance was in conflict with the solution they believe wrongly was correct. There ...


2

The notion of generally being suspicious of someone else's generosity can be captured with look a gift horse in the mouth to look in a critical way at something that has been given to one I noticed the guitar wasn't made of real wood, but I didn't say anything because you shouldn't look a gift horse in the mouth. Merriam-Webster


1

I found a different sense of the past tense "joed" in a despatch in the Otago Daily Times (New Zealand) from the Wakamarina Goldfield by James Browne in May 1864. He wrote about the gold escort, taking gold from the field to the nearest population settlement. You may form some idea of the [poor] estimate in which the escort is held by the miners, ...


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