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I think what you need is a pushover Dictionary.com defines it as someone who is easily controlled, offers very little resistance to what someone else wants to do, and backs down easily Another dictionary defines it as a person who is easily persuaded, influenced, or seduced You may also think of expressions like man of straw, easy meat or easy game.


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There is a saying that gives the same feeling of someone's claiming priority. It is often used humorously as parody rather than seriously. It is: "Let me through, I'm a doctor!" Ola Lindberg Ola's opening is worth quoting in full: "The scene is familiar. A crowd surrounds an injured person unsure what to do until someone pushes his or her ...


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While I was knee-deep in research, working to improve my answer, everyone else was out celebrating the new year. From Merriam Webster, knee-deep: b: deeply engaged or occupied knee-deep in work A tangible metaphor for how involved one can get in the work, to be "knee-deep" in something means the depth your involvement is significant enough that ...


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You might consider fob off, a phrasal verb defined by Collins in this way: If someone fobs you off, they tell you something just to stop you asking questions. [disapproval] Ex: I've asked her about it but she fobs me off. Don't be fobbed off with excuses. While this Phrase Dictionary defines it as: To put off deceitfully; to attempt to satisfy with ...


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I may call my brother an A-hole but that privilege is not open to others. To them I will take exception and, within limits, a violent correction. That "They may be terrible people but they are our terrible people" tells the same story. We excuse though denigrate our own in comparison to other families/groups that have other terrible people. Our ...


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A term denoting such a person, that (unlike ultracrepidarian) would be readily understood by most English speakers, is know-it-all. In British English, its variant know-all is also available. The term is inherently ironic: it means that the person does not, in fact, know very much, let alone 'all', but merely behaves as if he does.


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I make three suggestions (meddler and the more idiomatic backseat driver and busybody) but in confirming them have found others I did not know previously: meddler - an officious annoying person who interferes with others an unwelcome person, persona non grata - a person who for some reason is not wanted or welcome backseat driver - a meddler who insists on ...


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Be immersed in something is an idiomatic expression that may convey the meaning you are looking for: if you are immersed in something, you spend most of your time doing it or thinking about it as in: David was deeply immersed in student politics. (Macmillan Dictionary )


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I would have answered your question earlier but I was so wrapped up in my New Year breakfast. wrapped up in: idiom Definition of wrapped up in: fully involved or interested in (something) ”I was (completely) wrapped up in my work, so I didn't hear you.” Merriam Webster


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Acquiescent Accommodating or permissive in nature (of a person) Easily influenced by feelings or emotions Failing to act or protest as a result of moral weakness or indolence


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Sounds like "trial and error". Most of the times, especially after solving the problem after many trials, one is no longer sure which step (or combination of steps) actually fixed the issue. Wikipedia: Trial and error Trial and error is a fundamental method of problem-solving. It is characterized by repeated, varied attempts which are continued ...


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slapdash (approach) The Oxford English Dictionary defines this sense in part as "[w]ith, or as with, a slap and a dash," perhaps suggesting the notion of an action (such as painting) performed with quick, imprecise movements. Over 100 years later, the word acquired the adjectival sense with which we are more familiar today, describing something ...


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One term for this approach is scattershot, which M/W defines as "broadly and often randomly inclusive [as in] scattershot advice / scattershot planning"


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I think “grasping at straws” could work well here, it means trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work and trying to find a reason to feel hopeful in a bad situation: While neither of these quite captures “desperately” from you question, it depends on where you get the explanation from as dictionary.com does actually use ...


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You want people to see weeds in a different light. I do not know how neologism fits there; you are just taking up a commonplace entity and trying to breathe new perspective and meaning into it. Sounds cool! Anyway, I suggest you go with perspective as in Weeds: A fresh perspective or perhaps approach as in Weeds: A different approach. And both these words ...


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