New answers tagged

0

These Google ngrams ('off their own bat' shown for comparison) would indicate that 'out of their own hide/s' is far from common, so not idiomatic. And 'out of your own hide' is similarly distributed. The fact that there are only about ten hits in a Google search for "off their own hides" and that only a couple of these are used with the sense 'out ...


0

It's a idiom. I don't think it is. An idiom is a phrase whose meaning is not apparent from the literal meaning of the words: to bear OED 13a. transitive. To suffer (pain, hardship, or adversity) without being overcome or overwhelmed; to endure or resist (something) without giving in; to withstand; to cope with. 1611 Bible (King James) Gen. iv. 13 My ...


1

The expression "bear and forebear" may be a bit out of fashion today, but it has been in use since 1550 (at least) as a succinct form of advice to endure something unwanted, adverse, insulting, or otherwise negative and to refrain from striking back against the source of that negative thing. Jennifer Speake & John Simpson, The Concise Oxford ...


1

My granny told me that her husband, a policeman, in the early part of last century, wore a weatherproof cape. To prevent it blowing over his head, he filled the hem with leadshot. An uncooperative client was liable for a good "coating" with that cape...


0

Some (semi-)secret societies actually employ a physical tap on the shoulder to nominate an initiate into the society, or to signify an increase in rank or position. As an example, the Boy Scouts Order of the Arrow tap-out ceremony, seen here from 1944: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gaVTZOYynXA


2

I love language. Although not formally trained nor specifically instructed the following is pure whimsy from years of reading and some very bizarre trivial knowledge. Tapping on the shoulder is a selection, not a nomination. Its more of "Hey your up." I suspect that this has its etymology in Britain with the ceremony for knighthood, when one is ...


8

While I agree with other answers, I also would like to add this: In certain fraternities, honor societies, and organizations which serve[d] as power networks, [s]election to a higher level is done by a secret process. This may be by a secret ballot in which members may be able to vote for more than one candidate if they feel multiple candidates are ...


17

In the U.S. tap alone is used to mean selected/designated. In my opinion, it's more common here than "tap on the shoulder." Edit: in AmE. to tap is neutral, without a connotation of favoritism or nepotism, including the use of "tap on the shoulder" in the example below about the "best teachers." I'm not familiar with the nuances ...


25

“tapped on the shoulder” In this British (possibly only English - but I doubt it) legal context, it specifically means "approached for the purpose of enquiring if the person metaphorically tapped would want to be a judge." In such circumstances the appointment as a judge is virtually certain. What Do We Know About This Judge? In my opinion, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included