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12 votes

Understanding the joke, "Make an 'ell, I say" (from The Crux)

There's three sisters, and they are named Foote, which sounds like foot. So three Footes, or three feet, is a yard. This is a silly pun which, presumably, Mr. Lane finds more childish than amusing. To ...
gomennathan's user avatar
-1 votes

Understanding the joke, "Make an 'ell, I say" (from The Crux)

I would read the townsman's riposte: "A yard? They make an 'ell, I say." It would then be a double-entendre.
Stephen A.'s user avatar
0 votes

Understanding the joke, "Make an 'ell, I say" (from The Crux)

Here is how I read your example. Mr. Lane had no sense of humor, and Mr. Lane disapproved of the joke, calling it profane. I would investigate the possibility that the town joke invited the listener ...
G B Rhettor's user avatar
29 votes
Accepted

Understanding the joke, "Make an 'ell, I say" (from The Crux)

Foote sisters = three feet = one yard. The implication is likely also there that the three sisters all together at once is a lot to handle, socially and mentally, as they're described as having very ...
Anne Trotter's user avatar

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