5 votes
Accepted

must vs have to: British usage and academic rules

Depending on the context, the verb must can be used performatively. The verb have (to) cannot very easily with third person Subjects. What I mean by performatively, is that the actual uttering of the ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Deontic “must”, “have to” and “had to”

(1) How and when did have to express the sense of obligation? What void did it fill? Have to is an example of what's called a Periphrastic Modal (periphrastic is a technical term for 'paraphrased', ...
John Lawler's user avatar
4 votes

Deontic “must”, “have to” and “had to”

"Must" is what's known as a "defective" verb, or one that list lacking particular conjugations. "Must" is the only form of the verb; it doesn't change for third versus first person, and it has no past ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"has to" vs "must" in passive

It must/has to be possible to come back to the old version. As noted by xbnm, this isn't about "passive" at all. Forget passive. And it isn't about why Word suggested one version or another. ...
John Lawler's user avatar
2 votes

must have, have to have, or should have: What should I use?

You are confusing the use of have as a main verb with its use as an auxiliary - part of a modal form. Your sentence is correct. Must is used as a modal whereas have is the main verb expressing ...
fev's user avatar
  • 33.2k
2 votes
Accepted

Past tense vs present perfect tense

The Present Perfect is a tense that connects the past with the present. We use it when the time of an action is not specified/important AND when there is an immediate connection with the present. In ...
M.G.S.'s user avatar
  • 111
2 votes

“Don’t have to” at the end of the sentence

It is grammatically correct. It is referring to the verb phrase just mentioned, which is "walk to our house" in this example. "Don't have", instead, would be ambiguous, whereas the "to" in "don't ...
auspicious99's user avatar
  • 1,485
1 vote

"has to" vs "must" in passive

Actually, neither sentence is in passive form. Given sentences are equal to To come back to the old version has to be possible. To come back to the old version must be possible. To explain, with a ...
xvnm's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote

Why is the "have to" in "must have to" not redundant here?

It depends on what the speaker is trying to convey. Using either "must" or "have to" asserts that the statement is truth. You have to put in a password. You must put in a password....
JRodge01's user avatar
  • 1,175
1 vote

Must realise VS Must have realised

The model answer is quite correct. The speaker is saying that given what he knows Emily knows, she has no alternative but to realise she has made a mistake. In that sense, she does "have to" realise. ...
JeremyC's user avatar
  • 3,713
1 vote

had to have been vs. has to have been vs. must have been

The speaker is speculating about something in the past (so basically it is a past modal here, meaning has to have been is irrelevant) and there is different degrees to speculation indeed. Had to have ...
Yuri's user avatar
  • 145
1 vote

must vs have to: British usage and academic rules

'Must' is a modal auxiliary, and 'have to' contains an overloaded control verb and an infinitive marker (for the next verb). 'Have' is overloaded in that it can be a participle for the 'perfect' ...
AmI's user avatar
  • 3,662

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